Middlebury

The Axinn Center at Starr Library
Middlebury, VT
United States

The Donald Everett Axinn Center for Literary and Cultural Studies opened in 2008. The Center is home to the departments of History and English and American Literatures, as well as the programs in American Studies and Film and Media Culture. It features state-of-the-art classrooms and offices, as well as screening rooms, and a large media editing suite, and a winter garden looking to the south. Located on the historic Old Stone Row quad, the 82,400 square foot project preserved the original neoclassical Starr Library and the modernist Shepley Pavilion Reading Room, and added 50,000 square feet of new space.

History

Starr Library was built for the College's centennial in 1900, in response to a growing collection and with the help of a generous bequest of Egbert Starr. It was enlarged in 1925 to include two wings, given by his son Allen Starr. It was the first campus building constructed out of Vermont marble. The Meredith Wing of 1979 added much-needed space for shelving and study. With the renovations, some of these additions will be removed to place emphasis on the look of the original library building, and much of the original interior beauty will also be restored.

Murmur

Computer Labs

Axinn 105: 0 machines currently available.

Printing

AXN 105

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Courses

AMST0101A-S14

CRN: 21294

Intro to American Studies

Introduction to American Studies: American Representations of Crime and Violence
In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, video games, music, and journalism. This year, we will focus on American portrayals of crime and violence in a wide range of texts and cultural artifacts that provide us with a larger sense of how these representations function in the formation of categories of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ethics and religion, as well as socio-economic class in American society. Texts and films will range from True Crime to Pulp Fiction and from street photography to pictures of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0104A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104A-S14

CRN: 22063

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104A

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0210A-S14

CRN: 21880

Mod. American Cult. 1830-1919

Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919
An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0228A-S14

CRN: 22434

Development and the U.S.

Development and the United States
In this course we will explore the relationship between the United States and “Development”--the post-Second World War international project that emerged to help “modernize” the decolonizing world. We will investigate how the American modernization theory came to define the paths and goals of the international development project and how American policies of “nation building,” delineated U.S. relations with the “global south.” Readings will include theories on capitalist development and modernization, and discourses on American developmentalism in practice and their critiques 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0242A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0242A-S14

CRN: 22316

Film Comedy
Please register via FMMC 0242A

Film Comedy
A survey of American film comedy from the silent era to contemporary productions. The course will focus on various approaches such as clown comedy, romantic comedy, and satirical comedy. In addition, the course will explore screen comedy in the context of various theories of comedy, including the narrative design, the social dynamics, and the psychological understanding of humor. The filmmakers will include: Chaplin, Keaton, Lubitsch, Wilder, Woody Allen, among others. Screenings, readings and written assignments. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0347A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0347A-S14

CRN: 22293

Families-American Ethnic Lits

Families in American Ethnic Literatures
In this course we will explore depictions of "the family" by authors of various ethnicities-in every case interaction with/integration into "American life" is at issue. Under that broad rubric, we will discuss a range of topics, including: the processes of individual and group identity erasure and formation; experiences of intergenerational conflict; considerations of the burden and promise of personal and communal histories; examinations of varied understandings of race, class, and gender; and interrogations of "Americanness." Authors include Ronald Takaki, Gloria Naylor, Arturo Islas, Sherman Alexie, Philip Roth, Julie Otsuka, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, Gish Jen, and Dinaw Mengestu. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0205A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-S14

CRN: 21813

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0299A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299A-S14

CRN: 22046

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299A

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0373A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0373A-S14

CRN: 22519

The Novel and the City
Please register via ENAM 0373A

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

CRWR0170A-S14

CRN: 21593

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170B-S14

CRN: 21594

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170D-S14

CRN: 22549

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0323A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0323A-S14

CRN: 22531

Cinematic Movement: Poetry
Please register via ENAM 0323A

The Cinematic Movement: Poetry
This is a class not only on the craft of writing but also the craft of thinking visually about writing. We will examine artistic problems with writing across cultural lines and gender lines; essentially, we will explore approaches to writing in the voice of "the other." On a craft level, we will explore film and examine ways in which artistic problems can be solved on a visual level, and, ultimately, translated into the craft of writing poetry. At the same time, we will examine ways in which form within poetry and film can inform each other.

CRWR0341A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0341A-S14

CRN: 21597

Writing for the Screen II
Please register via FMMC 0341A

Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

ECON0150A-S14

CRN: 20246

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150B-S14

CRN: 20247

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150C-S14

CRN: 20249

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155C-S14

CRN: 20257

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0200A-S14

CRN: 21507

Health Economics & Policy

Health Economics and Policy
In this course we will focus on the health care system of the United States. We will apply standard microeconomic tools to the problems of health and health care markets. The course provides the fundamental tools with which to understand how the health care market is different from the markets for other goods. For example, students will learn about the dominant presence of uncertainty at all levels of health care, the government's unusually large presence in the market, the pronounced difference in knowledge between doctors and patients, and the prevalence of situations where the actions of some impose costs or benefits on others (e.g., vaccinations, drug research). (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0240A-S14

CRN: 22133

Int'l Econ: A Policy Approach

International Economics: A Policy Approach
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will discuss why countries trade, the concepts of absolute and comparative advantage, and gains from trade. We will explore commercial policies, arguments for and against tariffs, non-tariff barriers, dumping and subsidies, the role of the WTO, as well as the pros and cons of regional free trade associations. In the second part of the course we will primarily concentrate on international macroeconomics, focusing on foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, origins of and solutions to financial crises and the history and architecture of the international monetary system. (Formerly ECON 0340) (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

EDST0115A-S14

CRN: 21233

Education In the USA
Education in the USA

Education in the USA
What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

EDST0115B-S14

CRN: 21965

Education In the USA
Education in the USA

Education in the USA
What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0103D-S14

CRN: 21382

Reading Literature

Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0108A-S14

CRN: 22231

Animals in Literature

Animals in Literature and Culture
Animals, wrote anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss, are good to think with. They are good to write with as well; almost all works of literature include animals, their importance varying from the merely peripheral to the absolutely central. Among other narrative functions, animals serve as essential metaphors for understanding the human animal. In this course we will read a wide variety of fiction, poetry, children's literature, philosophy, science, history, and cultural theory from Ancient Greek sources (in translation) to the present. We will consider theoretical, ethical, religious, psychological, linguistic, and political issues pertaining to animals and their representation in literary texts. lect./disc.

ENAM0204B-S14

CRN: 21175

Foundations of English Lit.

Foundations of English Literature (I)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./dsc.

ENAM0205A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0205A-S14

CRN: 20374

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ENAM0208A-S14

CRN: 21783

Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900

English Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900
In this course we will examine literary and related works that take as their focus the natural world and man's relationship to it. We will consider transformations of taste in representations of landscape in England in the 18th and 19th centuries. Works to be discussed will include poems, gardening tracts, philosophical treatises, notebooks, letters, travel accounts, natural histories, and novels. Pope, Crabbe, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Clare, Hopkins, and Hardy will be central figures in this course.

ENAM0227A-S14

CRN: 22232

Nature, Culture, Poetry

Encounters With the Wild: Nature, Culture, Poetry (I)
Civilization is often defined against wilderness. The two ideas are not exclusive but mutually constitutive, for wilderness and the wild turn out to be central to notions of the civil and the civilized. Poets have long been preoccupied by the boundaries and connections between these ideas. The word "poetry" itself comes from a Greek word for "craft" or "shaping"; thus, poetry implies the shaping of natural elements into an artful whole. In this course we will examine the literary history of this ongoing dialectic by reading and discussing masterpieces of Western literature, from ancient epics to modern poetry and folklore. As we do so we will rethink the craft of poetry, and the role of the poet, in mapping the wild. Readings will include Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, sections of The Bible and Ovid's Metamorphoses, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Tempest, and poems by Wyatt, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Marvell, Pope, and Thompson. (This course counts toward the ENVS Literature focus and the ENVS Environmental Non-Fiction Focus) lect./disc.

ENAM0246A-S14

CRN: 22075

Literature and Social Protest

Books that Changed the World: Literature and Social Protest
Can literature change the world? In this course we will examine a wide range of texts written in response to war, economic and social crises (such as the Great Depression or environmental crises), health crises (the AIDS pandemic, for example), social and political oppression (slavery; racial, gender or sexual discrimination), and other historical events. We will explore the profound impact literature can have on the world and examine the rhetorical strategies writers use to effect real-world social change. Readings will include social theories and historiographies as well as literature. lect./disc

ENAM0319A-S14

CRN: 21733

Shakespeare

Shakespeare: Culture, Text, Performance (I)
In this course we will read Shakespeare's plays and poems in the context of the religious, political, and domestic culture of early modern England, yet also with the goal of understanding their relevance today-especially in terms of character, gender, race, and moral agency. We will pay particular attention to Elizabethan and Jacobean staging conventions, and to the tension between the plays as poetic works to be read and as scripts to be performed in aristocratic households and popular amphitheaters. We will also touch on modern film adaptations and interpretations, comparing them with original stagings and contexts.

ENAM0323A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0323A-S14

CRN: 22530

Cinematic Movement: Poetry

The Cinematic Movement: Poetry
This is a class not only on the craft of writing but also the craft of thinking visually about writing. We will examine artistic problems with writing across cultural lines and gender lines; essentially, we will explore approaches to writing in the voice of "the other." On a craft level, we will explore film and examine ways in which artistic problems can be solved on a visual level, and, ultimately, translated into the craft of writing poetry. At the same time, we will examine ways in which form within poetry and film can inform each other.

ENAM0347A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0347A-S14

CRN: 22294

Families-American Ethnic Lits
Please register via AMST 0347A

Families in American Ethnic Literatures
In this course we will explore depictions of "the family" by authors of various ethnicities-in every case interaction with/integration into "American life" is at issue. Under that broad rubric, we will discuss a range of topics, including: the processes of individual and group identity erasure and formation; experiences of intergenerational conflict; considerations of the burden and promise of personal and communal histories; examinations of varied understandings of race, class, and gender; and interrogations of "Americanness." Authors include Ronald Takaki, Gloria Naylor, Arturo Islas, Sherman Alexie, Philip Roth, Julie Otsuka, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, Gish Jen, and Dinaw Mengestu. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0371A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0371A-S14

CRN: 22329

Postcolonial Women Writers

In Different Voices: Postcolonial Writing by Women
In her important essay “Under Western Eyes,” Chandra Talpade Mohanty suggests that the experiences of women from the so-called Third World have to be understood in their own terms, rather than through the lens of Western feminism. Focusing on writings by Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Merle Hodge, Dionne Brand, Mahasweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, among others, we will examine how women from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean use fiction, poetry, and memoir to address a variety of concerns: familial relationships, caste, class, race, religious identity, history, education, work, national liberation, modernization, development, migration, diaspora, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0373A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0373A-S14

CRN: 22518

The Novel and the City

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

ENAM0419A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0419A-S14

CRN: 22238

Gender, Power and Politics

Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I)
In this class we will explore the representation of embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. As we consider the representation of the gendered body on stage or in so-called "closet" dramas, we will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria), the performance of maternity, the portrayal of female "voice" or vocality, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. We will also study the dramatic use of related cultural codes pertaining to betrothal, marriage, cross-dressing, and sexual slander. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Webster's Duchess of Malfi, Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, and Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure. Historical sources will include midwifery manuals, conduct books, medical treatises on hysteria, and legal accounts of betrothal and marriage. 3 hrs. lect.

FMMC0101A-S14

CRN: 21172

Aesthetics of the Moving Image

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101B-S14

CRN: 22492

Aesthetics of the Moving Image

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0102A-S14

CRN: 22552

Film History

Film History
This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104A-S14

CRN: 22064

Television & American Culture

Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-S14

CRN: 21173

Sight and Sound I

Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0242A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0242A-S14

CRN: 22437

Film Comedy

Film Comedy
A survey of American film comedy from the silent era to contemporary productions. The course will focus on various approaches such as clown comedy, romantic comedy, and satirical comedy. In addition, the course will explore screen comedy in the context of various theories of comedy, including the narrative design, the social dynamics, and the psychological understanding of humor. The filmmakers will include: Chaplin, Keaton, Lubitsch, Wilder, Woody Allen, among others. Screenings, readings and written assignments. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0279A-S14

CRN: 22318

Film & Literature

Film and Literature
The most common approach to the study of film and literature focuses on cinematic adaptations of literary works, but in this course we will broaden that tack, expanding to more of a comparative approach and considering topics relevant to both forms. We will explore how the cinema developed a formal language equivalent to the novel, as well as how fiction writing has been influenced by film. We will also consider how cinema's position as the equivalent of the novel has been usurped by television. Films screened will include A Day in the Country; Le Plaisir; Blow-Up; the recent BBC series Sherlock; and others. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101) (Formerly FMMC 0276)

FMMC0282A-S14

CRN: 22297

Videogames: Art/Culture/Medium

Videogames as Art, Culture, and Medium
Videogames have become one of the world's most important entertainment forms, exerting broad influence economically, aesthetically, culturally, and socially. This course explores the medium of the videogame in its multiple facets and offers an introduction to the academic subfield of game studies. We will read about game history, design, and cultural criticism, as well as play an array of games to gain a better understanding of how this medium matters. Prior background in gaming is not required. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0104 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem./lab

FMMC0285A-S14

CRN: 22319

Producing Environmental Media

Producing Environmental Media
In this course we will work together as a team to produce a short computer animated film with an environmental theme. Every team member will have a specific focus in the animation pipeline such as: modeling, rigging, animation, texturing, painting, concept art, sound design, music composition, writing, editing, or deployment. Beyond our concrete animation goals, we will develop real-world experience in the core skills of team-building, communication, presentation, strategic planning, and resource management. Most students should have prior animation experience; some will be admitted for their environmental studies or film production background. (Approval required) 3 hrs. workshop

FMMC0334A-S14

CRN: 22360

Videographic Film Studies

FMMC 0334 Videographic Film Studies
New technologies of digital video production—movies on DVD, DV cameras, and
non-linear editing programs—now enable film scholars to “write” with the very materials that constitute their object of study: moving images and sounds. But such a change means rethinking the rhetorical modes traditionally used in scholarly writing, and supplementing them with a new concern with aesthetics. In this course we will both study and produce new videographic forms of multi-media criticism, exploring how scholarship can itself adopt cinema’s alluring poetics without abandoning the traditional essay’s knowledge effect. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0341A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0341A-S14

CRN: 20618

Writing for the Screen II

Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0700B-S14

CRN: 21608

Senior Tutorial

Film and Media Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available.

GSFS0200A-S14

CRN: 22242

Foundations in GSFS Studies

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0371A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0371A-S14

CRN: 22330

Postcolonial Women Writers
Please register via ENAM 0371A

In Different Voices: Postcolonial Writing by Women
In her important essay “Under Western Eyes,” Chandra Talpade Mohanty suggests that the experiences of women from the so-called Third World have to be understood in their own terms, rather than through the lens of Western feminism. Focusing on writings by Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Merle Hodge, Dionne Brand, Mahasweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, among others, we will examine how women from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean use fiction, poetry, and memoir to address a variety of concerns: familial relationships, caste, class, race, religious identity, history, education, work, national liberation, modernization, development, migration, diaspora, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0393A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0393A-S14

CRN: 22250

Gender in Early America
Please register via HIST 0393A

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GSFS0419A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0419A-S14

CRN: 22251

Gender, Power and Politics
Please register via ENAM 0419A

Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage
In this class we will explore the representation of embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. As we consider the representation of the gendered body on stage or in so-called "closet" dramas, we will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria), the performance of maternity, the portrayal of female "voice" or vocality, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. We will also study the dramatic use of related cultural codes pertaining to betrothal, marriage, cross-dressing, and sexual slander. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Webster's Duchess of Malfi, Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, and Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure. Historical sources will include midwifery manuals, conduct books, medical treatises on hysteria, and legal accounts of betrothal and marriage. 3 hrs. lect.

HIST0107A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0107B-S14

CRN: 22289

Modern Latin America

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0107B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0107A-S14

CRN: 22418

Modern Latin America

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0107Y-S14

CRN: 22420

Modern Latin America
Discussion

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0107Z-S14

CRN: 22419

Modern Latin America
Discussion

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0110A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0110B-S14

CRN: 22139

Modern South Asia

Modern South Asia
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0110B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0110A-S14

CRN: 21632

Modern South Asia

Modern South Asia
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0112A-S14

CRN: 22140

Modern East Asia

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0113A-S14

CRN: 22144

History of Africa to 1800

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0207A-S14

CRN: 22564

The Southwest Borderlands

The Southwest Borderlands: Cultural Encounters in a Changing Environment
In the wake of the US-Mexican War in 1848, Anglo-settlers, Native Americans, and Mexicans struggled over competing visions of an American future that would take root in the Southwest Borderlands. In this course we will examine how cross-cultural encounters shaped policy, changed the landscape, and heightened racial tensions. Using a variety of texts—documentary and feature films, magazines and newspapers, travelers' accounts and popular literature—we will explore a wide range of topics: territorial expansion, Native dispossession, racial formation and anxiety, the creation of the sunbelt, Mexican migration and labor, and the rise of the information economy. Drawing on these items, we will ultimately reflect on how past and present collide on the American borderlands, shaping the United States in countless ways. 3 hrs. lect

HIST0212A-S14

CRN: 22151

Civil War and Reconstruction

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0241A-S14

CRN: 22155

Europe in Early Middle Ages

Europe in the Early Middle Ages
This course covers the formative centuries in European history which witnessed the emergence of Western Europe as a distinct civilization. During this period, A. D. 300-1050, the three major building blocks of Western European culture: the classical tradition of Greco-Roman antiquity, the Judeo-Christian tradition, and Germanic tradition, met and fused into an uneasy synthesis that gave Western Europe its cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious foundations. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0245A-S14

CRN: 22156

Hist Modern Europe 1800-1900

History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900
This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0250A-S14

CRN: 22160

The Jews in Modern Europe

The Jews in Modern Europe
In this course we will map the emergence of Jewish minority culture into the modern Western political, economic, and social mainstream. Our course begins with the Jewish Haskalah (with a few short introductions to Jewish medieval and early modern history) and ends with Israel's founding in the early decades of its history. We will trace the following historical trends: the history of Jewish emancipation; assimilation; intellectual movements; Zionism; Jewish marginalization; race and gender as historical categories in Jewish history; urban and diasporic cultures; war and violence; and international politics in post-Holocaust Europe and the world. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0352A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0352B-S14

CRN: 21714

Food History in Middle East

Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
Who invented Baklava? Was it the Greeks, Turks, Armenians, or maybe the Lebanese? In this course, we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Through a close study of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will also investigate how, in the modern period, Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0352B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0352A-S14

CRN: 22331

Food History in Middle East

Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
Who invented Baklava? Was it the Greeks, Turks, Armenians, or maybe the Lebanese? In this course, we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Through a close study of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will also investigate how, in the modern period, Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0393A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0393A-S14

CRN: 21654

Gender in Early America

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0395A-S14

CRN: 22336

Mad Men and Mad Women

“Mad Men and Mad Women”*
Are you a Don, a Roger, or a Pete? A Betty, a Peggy or a Joan? Using AMC's Mad Men as a visual and narrative foundation, we will examine masculinity and femininity in mid-20th century America. We will focus specifically on the connections between postwar mass communication and formation of gender roles, consumption, and cultural expectations. Our inquiry will then extend to recent discussions regarding the politics of historical representation. In addition to the television series, we will use a variety of both primary and secondary sources—including novels, magazines, sociological studies, and scholarly monographs—to achieve a multi-dimensional perspective. (Not open to students who have taken HIST 1017) 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0427A-S14

CRN: 22172

Diaspora & Trans-nationalism

Diaspora and Trans-nationalism
In this course we will explore the global flow of people across national boundaries in the modern era. During the first part of the course we will examine the major theoretical frameworks of transnational migration and diasporas by reading the works of writers such as Hannah Arendt, Edward Said, and W. E. B. Dubois. We will focus on the social and cultural processes that pose challenges to the traditional hegemony of the nation-state, and examine the political and economic relations of diaspora communities to homeland. In the second half of the course we will study how organic intellectuals, performers, and other artists from all across the Atlantic world agitated to transform the social dynamics within the political, linguistic, and geographical boundaries of their new home while re-imagining new relations with the place they once called home. Students will choose a research topic on a diaspora community of their interest and be required to make direct contact with the communities we study. 3 hrs. sem. (formerly HIST 0413)

INTD0105A-S14

CRN: 22381

Intro to Public Health Policy

Introduction to Public Health Policy
This course will provide an introduction to the range and impact of public health problems, as well as the tools used by policy-makers to describe and analyze them. In this course we will discuss the philosophical, economic, and political drivers of domestic and international public health policy, as well as demonstrate the potential and limitations of analytic tools (economics, decision science, epidemiology, risk assessment) using specific public health topics as examples (e.g. vaccine-preventable diseases, hunger, chronic disease risk factors, pandemic influenza, health care reform, bioterrorism). Current events and examples in the media, as well as classic case studies, will provide the basis for discussions and readings. (Not open to students who have taken INTD 1094)

ITAL0103A-S14

CRN: 21300

Intensive Beginning Italian

Intensive Beginning Italian III
This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen.

ITAL0123A-S14

CRN: 21267

Accelerated Beginning Italian

Accelerated Beginning Italian
This course is an intensive introduction to the Italian language that condenses the material normally covered in ITAL 0101 and 0102. We will focus on the spoken language and encourage rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary. Conversation and drill will be stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian culture, film, and music. We will meet 5 times a week including two 75-minutes meetings and an additional drill session. After completing this course students will be fully prepared for second-year Italian. 6 hr lect./disc./1.5 hr drill

ITAL0252A-S14

CRN: 20463

Italian Culture: Facism-Pres

Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day
To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ITAL0252B-S14

CRN: 20464

Italian Culture: Facism-Pres

Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day
To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ITAL0252Z-S14

CRN: 21276

Italian Culture: Facism-Pres
Screening

Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day
To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ITAL0299A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0299A-S14

CRN: 22045

Literary Feasts

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PSCI0227A-S14

CRN: 22189

Soviet & Russian Politics

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0311A-S14

CRN: 22194

American Foreign Policy

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

RELI0390A-S14

CRN: 22372

Seminar in Religious Ethics
Black Women's Voices

Seminar in Religious Ethics: Black Women’s Voices of Liberation
Standing at the intersection of racial and gender discrimination, African American women have engaged structures of oppression from a distinct perspective. This course explores the origins and development of womanist and black feminist thought, beginning with abolitionists like Maria Stewart and Sojourner Truth, and extending to calls for justice during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights eras. We will also consider the continuing struggle for liberation in the work of contemporary black feminist ethics. We will examine the religious impulses that inform African American women’s responses to marginalization and consider how the study of black feminism informs our understanding of women and race in contemporary American society. 3 hrs. sem.

SOAN0235A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0235B-S14

CRN: 21681

The City and Its People

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

SOAN0235B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0235A-S14

CRN: 21682

The City and Its People

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

SOAN0301A-S14

CRN: 20400

Soc Research Methods

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab. (Sociology)

SPAN0210C-S14

CRN: 20027

Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate Spanish I
A course designed to consolidate the skills attained in SPAN 0101, SPAN 0102, and 0103 or the equivalent (0105). A grammar review will accompany an intensive component of readings, discussions, and compositions. (SPAN 0103, SPAN 0105, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SPAN0210D-S14

CRN: 21922

Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate Spanish I
A course designed to consolidate the skills attained in SPAN 0101, SPAN 0102, and 0103 or the equivalent (0105). A grammar review will accompany an intensive component of readings, discussions, and compositions. (SPAN 0103, SPAN 0105, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SPAN0220D-S14

CRN: 20086

Intermediate Spanish II

Intermediate Spanish II
A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SPAN0397A-S14

CRN: 22485

Maoism & Fascism Latin America

A Struggle of Literature and Politics: Maoism and Fascism in Latin America
Despite the influence that Maoism and fascism exerted—and still exert—in Latin America, comprehensive effort to depict their effects in today’s literary and cultural fields has not been taken. In this course we will analyze how Latin American literature from the mid-20th century to present appropriates and transforms these two extreme political discourses. It does so according to its own agenda: defense, confrontation, complaint, perception of threats, or prophecies in which the nation’s future is always at stake. Works by Pérez Huarancca, Piglia, Reynoso, Salgado, De Andrade, Saenz, and Bolaño will be analyzed in conjunction with readings by Mao, Nietzsche, and Hitler. 3 hrs. sem.

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