Middlebury

Le Chateau
139 Chateau Rd.
Middlebury, VT
United States

Modeled on the Pavillon Henri IV of the Chateau de Fontainebleau, it is home to the Grand Salon, classrooms, French Department offices, and rooms for 48 students. Downstairs is a small theatre facility, once a student dining room, where various language departments mount plays in the target language.

History

Built in 1925, Le Chateau was once the first and largest continuous "language house" in the country where students were pledged to the use of the foreign language of their study. It has long been home to the French School over the summer, serving as both a residence and an office building.

Type of Housing

Upper-classmen Housing

Features

21 singles, 12 doubles, 7 bathrooms, Grand Salon lounge, theatre facility, storage on the third floor, French Department offices.

Room Video

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Departments

Courses

CMLT0325A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0325A-S14

CRN: 22079

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Please register via ENAM 0325A

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Although Tang poetry is recognized as one of the great achievements of world literature, its beauty is often lost in translation since so much of that beauty is integrally related to the structure of classical Chinese. In this course—intended for students with no knowledge of Chinese—we will thus spend a significant portion of our time learning from scratch how to read Tang poetry in the original by studying the most common characters and the most fundamental grammatical structures found in the Tang “sonnet.” Our energy will equally be devoted to examining such topics as: differences between Chinese and European poetics; differing theories of translation and intercultural adaptation; Orientalist fantasies of the ideogram; and the impact of ancient Chinese poetry on modern European and American poetry, especially the Imagism movement. Students will both study and write multiple translations in various styles. Readings will include both poetry and critical theory. Students who already know Chinese are not allowed to enroll. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

EDST0210B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0210B-S14

CRN: 22433

Sophomore Seminar/Liberal Arts
Please register via INTD 0210B

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived.

ENAM0325A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0325A-S14

CRN: 22080

Chinese Poetry in the Far West

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Although Tang poetry is recognized as one of the great achievements of world literature, its beauty is often lost in translation since so much of that beauty is integrally related to the structure of classical Chinese. In this course—intended for students with no knowledge of Chinese—we will thus spend a significant portion of our time learning from scratch how to read Tang poetry in the original by studying the most common characters and the most fundamental grammatical structures found in the Tang “sonnet.” Our energy will equally be devoted to examining such topics as: differences between Chinese and European poetics; differing theories of translation and intercultural adaptation; Orientalist fantasies of the ideogram; and the impact of ancient Chinese poetry on modern European and American poetry, especially the Imagism movement. Students will both study and write multiple translations in various styles. Readings will include both poetry and critical theory. Students who already know Chinese are not allowed to enroll. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ENVS0215A-S14

CRN: 20234

Nature's Meanings

Nature's Meanings: American Experiences
Today’s ideas about "nature" have emerged from a complex history of diverse experiences, perceptions, and understandings of the bio-physical world, and of contests over that world. In this course we will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. These questions will be addressed from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. Topics and readings may include: Native American authors, Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as rural, urban, pastoral, and marine ecological contexts. 3 hrs. lect.

FREN0103A-S14

CRN: 20388

Beginning French Part Three

Beginning French
Emphasis on increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Readings and film enlarge the student's view of French life and culture. (FREN 0101 and FREN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0103B-S14

CRN: 20383

Beginning French Part Three

Beginning French
Emphasis on increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Readings and film enlarge the student's view of French life and culture. (FREN 0101 and FREN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0105A-S14

CRN: 21872

Accelerated Beginning French

Accelerated Beginning French
This intensive course is a condensation of FREN 0101 and 0102 for students who have never before studied French. We will focus on the development of all four communicative skills in an immersion-style environment. Primary emphasis will be placed on increased oral proficiency through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Upon successful completion of this course students will be prepared for second-year French in the fall. Weekly attendance at the French language table will be required. 6 hrs. lect./disc./1 hr. drill

FREN0205A-S14

CRN: 21025

Toward Liberated Expression

Toward Liberated Expression
A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0205B-S14

CRN: 20799

Toward Liberated Expression

Toward Liberated Expression
A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0205C-S14

CRN: 20025

Toward Liberated Expression

Toward Liberated Expression
A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0210A-S14

CRN: 20030

Identity in French Literature

Identity in French Literature
Exploration of differing views of the self, society, and the world in major works of French poetry, drama, and prose. This course is designed to develop students' ability to read and critique literature in French, as a transition from FREN 0205 to more advanced literature courses. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0210B-S14

CRN: 20032

Identity in French Literature

Identity in French Literature
Exploration of differing views of the self, society, and the world in major works of French poetry, drama, and prose. This course is designed to develop students' ability to read and critique literature in French, as a transition from FREN 0205 to more advanced literature courses. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0221A-S14

CRN: 20065

From Romanticism to Modernism

From Romanticism to Modernism
The 19th and 20th centuries were marked by social and political revolutions and by literary and artistic movements that changed our attitudes to art and to ourselves, including romanticism, realism, symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism. We will study literary texts, artistic and philosophical movements, and the social circumstances that conditioned them. Close readings of the texts (including prose, drama, and poetry) will develop critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre, and Francophone writers. (FREN 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (1 additional hour for CW, Fall).

FREN0221B-S14

CRN: 20067

From Romanticism to Modernism

From Romanticism to Modernism
The 19th and 20th centuries were marked by social and political revolutions and by literary and artistic movements that changed our attitudes to art and to ourselves, including romanticism, realism, symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism. We will study literary texts, artistic and philosophical movements, and the social circumstances that conditioned them. Close readings of the texts (including prose, drama, and poetry) will develop critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre, and Francophone writers. (FREN 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (1 additional hour for CW, Fall).

FREN0230A-S14

CRN: 20075

Introduction to Contemp France

Introduction to Contemporary France
An introduction to several major sectors and themes: the family, the school system, social structures, the economy, the political structures and parties. Emphasis on the vocabulary of these sectors, language appropriate to situating them in context, and the ability to analyze documents involving such themes. (FREN 0210, or FREN 0221; ordinarily this course is closed to first-semester first year students) This requirement for the major may also be met by certain courses in France, or by an equivalent in the summer French School. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0230B-S14

CRN: 21352

Introduction to Contemp France

Introduction to Contemporary France
An introduction to several major sectors and themes: the family, the school system, social structures, the economy, the political structures and parties. Emphasis on the vocabulary of these sectors, language appropriate to situating them in context, and the ability to analyze documents involving such themes. (FREN 0210, or FREN 0221; ordinarily this course is closed to first-semester first year students) This requirement for the major may also be met by certain courses in France, or by an equivalent in the summer French School. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0306A-S14

CRN: 22321

Study/Production of a Play

Study and Production of a Play
French through theatre: this course is a semester-long workshop that will culminate in the production of a play by a French or francophone playwright. Students will participate in all aspects of the production process, from costuming and music to prompting and publicity. Two performances will be held at the end of the semester. All activity will be conducted in French. In addition to regularly scheduled classes, this course will involve additional time each week in rehearsal. (FREN 0221 or by waiver).

FREN0341A-S14

CRN: 22348

French Cinema

French Cinema
In this course we will study two aspects of French cinema: French history through films and French filmmaking through history. We will examine films dealing with specific eras or events of French history or culture, as well as the major trends of French film history and the evolution of French filmmaking. Directors studied may include: Renoir, Truffaut, Godard, Rohmer, Kurys, Besson. (FREN 0221 or FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screening.

FREN0351A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0351A-S14

CRN: 22322

Presidents of Fifth Republic

Presidents of the Fifth Republic
In this course we will examine presidential power in France's Fifth Republic, introduced in 1958. We will study the seven presidents of the Fifth Republic - Charles de Gaulle, Georges Pompidou, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy, and the current president François Hollande - through memoirs, speeches, research monographs, journal articles, and biographies. We will focus on the content of their domestic and foreign policies as well as their leadership strategies and visions for France in a comparative perspective. (This course will be taught in French; FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. and film screenings.

FREN0378A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FREN0478A-S14

CRN: 22452

Hugo: Man of His Century

Hugo: Man of His Century
In this senior seminar we will explore the 19th century through the work of Victor Hugo. His identification with his time is a natural starting point to study the interface of society, literature, and art. We will read two novels, two plays, numerous poems, 19th century newspapers, and Hugo’s theoretical essays. Students will choose to research one of Hugo’s many dimensions (poetry, novels, plays, drawings), or deepen their knowledge of a specific period of the century through Hugo’s political commitment. (Open to Senior Non-Majors and Juniors with instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FREN0478A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FREN0378A-S14

CRN: 22324

Hugo: Man of His Century

Hugo: Man of His Century
In this senior seminar we will explore the 19th century through the work of Victor Hugo. His identification with his time is a natural starting point to study the interface of society, literature, and art. We will read two novels, two plays, numerous poems, 19th century newspapers, and Hugo's theoretical essays. Students will choose to research one of Hugo's many dimensions (poetry, novels, plays, drawings), or deepen their knowledge of a specific period of the century through Hugo's political commitment. This seminar will include a significant research component. (Open to French Senior Majors). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0314A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S14 SOAN0314B-S14 GSFS0314B-S14

CRN: 22246

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314A

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0314B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S14 SOAN0314B-S14 GSFS0314A-S14

CRN: 22247

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314B

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

HIST0245X-S14

CRN: 22459

Hist Modern Europe 1800-1900
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900
This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0245Y-S14

CRN: 22460

Hist Modern Europe 1800-1900
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900
This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0245Z-S14

CRN: 22462

Hist Modern Europe 1800-1900
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900
This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0312A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0312A-S14

CRN: 22332

Tokyo Between History & Utopia

Tokyo: Between History and Utopia
In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo—from its "prehistory" as a small castle town in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century—and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, of play, and for many, of decadence. Through a range of sources, including films, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a "site" (both urban and ideological) through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the nation-state, cultural identity, gender politics, and mass-culture. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0391A-S14

CRN: 22170

Native American / Imagination

Native Americans in the American Imagination
In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will examine the changing image of Native Americans in American popular culture from 1800-2000. Through novels, plays, films, photography, advertisements, amusements, sport-team mascots, and museum displays, we will trace and analyze how the American Indian has been defined, appropriated, and represented popularly to Americans from the early republic to the turn of the twenty-first century. We will consider how American popular culture has used over time the image of the American Indian to symbolize national concerns and to forge a national American identity. 3 hrs. sem.

INTD0210B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0210B-S14

CRN: 22431

Sophomore Seminar/Liberal Arts

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP (J. Miller-Lane; P. Zupan)

JAPN0312A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0312A-S14

CRN: 22333

Tokyo Between History & Utopia
Please register via HIST 0312A

Tokyo: Between History and Utopia
In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo—from its "prehistory" as a small castle town in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century—and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, of play, and for many, of decadence. Through a range of sources, including films, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a "site" (both urban and ideological) through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the nation-state, cultural identity, gender politics, and mass-culture. 3 hrs. sem.

LNGT0303A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0303A-S14

CRN: 22376

Intro Span Phonetics/Pronunc.
Please register via SPAN 0303A

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PSCI0202A-S14

CRN: 21259

African Politics

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0351A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FREN0351A-S14

CRN: 22323

Presidents of Fifth Republic
Please register via FREN 0351A

Presidents of the Fifth Republic
In this course we will examine presidential power in France's Fifth Republic, introduced in 1958. We will study the seven presidents of the Fifth Republic - Charles de Gaulle, Georges Pompidou, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy, and the current president François Hollande - through memoirs, speeches, research monographs, journal articles, and biographies. We will focus on the content of their domestic and foreign policies as well as their leadership strategies and visions for France in a comparative perspective. (This course will be taught in French; FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. and film screenings. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0437A-S14

CRN: 22281

Understanding Intervention

In this seminar we will examine third-party intervention and its effects on conflict. Why do interveners get involved? In what ways do third parties try to manage or influence conflict? We will discuss various types of intervention, including economic sanctions, military assistance, and covert operations. We will then consider how interveners affect the outbreak, duration, and conclusion of conflict. Do interveners make conflict more or less likely to start? Do they shorten or lengthen fighting? How do they affect war outcomes? Case studies of intervention include Bosnia and Kosovo, World War I and World War II, and various Cold War conflicts. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOAN0314A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314B-S14 GSFS0314A-S14 GSFS0314B-S14

CRN: 21292

Sociology of Heterosexuality

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0314B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S14 GSFS0314A-S14 GSFS0314B-S14

CRN: 21316

Sociology of Heterosexuality

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SPAN0103C-S14

CRN: 21992

Beginning Spanish III

Beginning Spanish III
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

SPAN0303A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0303A-S14

CRN: 22375

Intro Span Phonetics/Pronunc.

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

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