Middlebury

Munroe Hall
427 College St.
Middlebury, VT
United States

Munroe Hall is the heart of many academic departments of the College, including Economics, English and American Literatures, History, Political Science, Religion, Sociology/Anthropology. Munroe Hall also has classrooms on every floor. Possibly the busiest building on campus during class hours, every Middlebury graduate can be sure to have had at least one class in Munroe. Also in front of the building is the beloved sculpture, Frisbee Dog.

History

Munroe Hall was constructed on the footprint of the original tennis courts on College Street, west of the Voter Chemistry Building. Completed in 1941, Munroe was named after Charles Andrew Munroe '1896, a Middlebury native and trustee of the College.

Murmur

Computer Labs

Munroe Hall 214: 0 machines currently available.

Printing

MNR 214

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Departments

Courses

AMST0240A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0240A-S14

CRN: 22357

Captivity Narratives

Captivity Narratives
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0253A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0253A-S14

CRN: 22302

Science Fiction

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0263A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0263A-S14

CRN: 22303

American Psycho
Please register via ENAM 0263A

American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) *
What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, /One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest/, Thomas Harris, /The Silence of the Lambs/, Susanna Kaysen, /Girl, Interrupted/, and Bret Easton Ellis, /American Psycho/.

AMST0308A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0308A-S14

CRN: 21873

Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

CHNS0103A-S14

CRN: 20378

Beginning Chinese

Beginning Chinese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill

CHNS0103B-S14

CRN: 20430

Beginning Chinese

Beginning Chinese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill

CHNS0103C-S14

CRN: 21013

Beginning Chinese

Beginning Chinese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill

CHNS0202A-S14

CRN: 20487

Intermediate Chinese II

Intermediate Chinese
This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill

CHNS0202B-S14

CRN: 20756

Intermediate Chinese II

Intermediate Chinese
This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill

CHNS0270A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0270A-S14

CRN: 21266

Chinese Sociolinguistics

Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver)

CHNS0325A-S14

CRN: 22048

Traditional Chinese Poetry

Traditional Chinese Poetry (in translation)
Introducing the basics of Chinese poetics, this junior/sophomore discussion-based seminar explores inter-connections across a wide spectrum of Chinese poetry belonging to a vibrant tradition spanning more than two thousand years--folk songs; court rhapsodies; courtesan love poems; extended allegorical fantasies; ballads and lyric verse of love, war, friendship, loss, and separation. Landscape, travel, romantic and metaphysical poems by masters such as Qu Yuan, Tao Yuanming, Wang Wei, Li Bai, Du Fu, Su Dongpo and Li Qingzhao will be studied. We will analyze poetic expression ranging from poetic genres following strict formal conventions to relatively free-form verse. Traditional Chinese literary theories regarding poetry and its appreciation will be considered, yet students will also be encouraged to apply other critical approaches. (Either CHNS 0219 or CHNS 0220, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

CHNS0412A-S14

CRN: 20510

Classical Chinese II

Classical Chinese II (in Chinese)
A continuation of CHNS 0411. In this course students will read a wide selection of wenyan texts that sample the classics of ancient Chinese thought, including Confucius' Analects, the Daoist texts Laozi and Zhuangzi, Mohist arguments against war, Sunzi's The Art of War, and Legalist writings on law. Students will also learn to punctuate wenyan texts (which were originally unpunctuated) and compose sentences or short paragraphs in wenyan. All class discussion will be conducted in modern Chinese. (CHNS 0411 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect.

CHNS0426A-S14

CRN: 21184

Chns Politics/Business Adv Rdg

Politics and Business in China: Advanced Readings and Discussion (in Chinese)
The capstone course for those students who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. The goal of this course is to help students improve their ability to read, write, and talk about politics and business in China. Most of this course will focus on recent and current debate and discussion in China over domestic political programs and policies, international relations, and business trends. Discussion will also touch upon the political and economic history of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. We will read articles intended for popular audiences in the Chinese-speaking world. 3 hrs. lect. (CHNS 0425 or CHNS 0411 or study abroad in China)

CHNS0475A-S14

CRN: 20511

Seminar Chinese Fiction

Senior Seminar on Modern Chinese Literature (in Chinese)
A capstone course for all Chinese majors and for others who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. Students will read and critique works by major Chinese fiction writers (and sometimes playwrights) and also see and discuss films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and/or Taiwan. All reading, discussion, and critical writing will be in Chinese. (CHNS 0412 or CHNS 0425) 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0101B-S14

CRN: 21407

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101C-S14

CRN: 21408

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CRWR0172A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0172A-S14

CRN: 22299

Writing Gender & Sexuality

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

DANC0285A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285B-S14 GSFS0285A-S14 GSFS0285B-S14

CRN: 21885

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

DANC0285B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S14 GSFS0285A-S14 GSFS0285B-S14

CRN: 21952

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

ECON0485A-S14

CRN: 21514

The Economics of Sports

The Economics of Sports
This is a survey course of topics illustrating how microeconomic principles apply to the sports industry. Topics covered will include the industrial organization of the sports industry (notably, issues of competitive balance and the implications of monopoly power), the public finance of sports (notably, the impact teams have on host municipalities), and labor issues related to sports (including player worth and discrimination). The prerequisites for this course are meant to ensure that students can both understand fundamental economic concepts and present the results of econometric research as they apply to the sports industry. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0702B-S14

CRN: 22503

Senior Research Workshop II

Senior Research Workshop II
In this second semester of the senior research workshop sequence, the focus is on the execution of the research plan developed in ECON 0701. Most instruction is now one-on-one but the workshop will still meet as a group to discuss and practice the presentation of results in various formats (seminars, poster sessions, et cetera) to the rest of the workshop and others in the college and broader communities. Feedback and critiques from such presentations will be incorporated into the project, which will culminate in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. (ECON 0701; Approval required)

ENAM0103A-S14

CRN: 20711

Reading Literature

Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0180X-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180X-S14

CRN: 21419

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180X

An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Y-S14

CRN: 21420

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Y

An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Z-S14

CRN: 21421

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Z

An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0240A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0240A-S14

CRN: 22520

Captivity Narratives
Please register via AMST 0240A

Captivity Narratives
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0253A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0253A-S14

CRN: 22233

Science Fiction
Please register via AMST 0253A

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0263A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0263A-S14

CRN: 22310

American Psycho

American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) *
What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, /One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest/, Thomas Harris, /The Silence of the Lambs/, Susanna Kaysen, /Girl, Interrupted/, and Bret Easton Ellis, /American Psycho/.

ENAM0700Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0710Z-S14

CRN: 20957

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Essay: Discussion

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical essay writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0710Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0700Z-S14

CRN: 20958

Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.
Senior Thesis: Discussion

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

FYSE1211A-S14

CRN: 22288

Godel, Escher, Bach

Gödel, Escher, Bach
At the turn of the 20th century, mathematics took an introspective turn when its practitioners attempted to organize reasoning itself into an axiomatic system of theorems and definitions. The results were provocative and ended in a kind of paradox when logician Kurt Gödel proved that all formalized logical systems would necessarily contain some unprovable truths. Reading Douglas Hofstadter's Gödel, Escher, Bach, we will discover the connections among seemingly disparate fields of mathematics, visual arts, and music. Our journey will pass through the philosophical worlds of Lewis Carroll, Artificial Intelligence, non-Euclidean geometry, Zen Buddhism, and crash head-on into questions about the nature of human consciousness and creativity. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0172A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0172A-S14

CRN: 22313

Writing, Gender & Sexuality
Please register via CRWR 0172A

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

GSFS0285A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S14 DANC0285B-S14 GSFS0285B-S14

CRN: 22506

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285A

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0285B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S14 DANC0285B-S14 GSFS0285A-S14

CRN: 22507

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285B

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0341A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0341A-S14

CRN: 22249

Gender Sexuality S. Asian Rel
Please register via RELI 0341A

Gender and Sexuality in South Asian Religions
In this course we will focus on historical and ethnographic scholarship on Hinduism and Islam in South Asia. We will initially draw on the theories of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and third world feminists to examine issues of gender and sexuality. Then we will examine a range of case studies—including colonial interpretations of the Hindu practices of sati, the experiences of devadasis in Telugu south India, an account of a female Muslim healer in Hyderabad, and the religious practices of third-gendered hijras—to address how gender and sexuality are constructed in the religious landscape of South Asian Hinduism and Islam. Prior study of religion or women’s and gender studies is required. 3 hrs. sem.

HEBM0202A-S14

CRN: 21383

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
This is the fifth in the sequence of Modern Hebrew courses that focus on the acquisition of reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. This course will further increase the students' fluency in spoken Hebrew, as well as their facility in reading authentic texts dealing with both secular and religious Jewish cultures, the literature of modern-day Israel, Israeli history, and current events. By the end of the semester, students should attain the level of educated, non-native speakers of Modern Hebrew, in terms of knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, composition, and communicative competence. (HEBM 0201 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc.

HEBM0250A-S14

CRN: 22566

Israeli Soc. Through Films

Israeli Society through Modern Films (In English)
Though Israel is often in the news, most people know little of its vibrant popular culture, or how its cultural products offer the nation an opportunity to represent itself to itself in surprising and thoughtful ways. In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through contemporary Israeli cinema. The films address such themes as the experiences of Holocaust survivors and new immigrants, relationships among Israeli Jews from different origins, army service, life both in the kibbutz and the city, and the Israeli-Arab conflict. Focus will be on films that have enjoyed both popular and critical success in Israel such as Waltz with Bashir, Beyond the Sea, and Sweat Mud.

HIST0247A-S14

CRN: 22157

Imperial Russia

Imperial Russia
This course introduces students to the major themes, problems, and events of Russia’s imperial past focusing on the 300-year rule of the Romanov dynasty and extending to the dawn of the revolutionary era. Our major themes will include: the development of Russia’s absolutist state; the processes of secularization, westernization, and industrialization; the interplay between reform, rebellion, and revolution in enacting political change; the growth of Russia’s multi-ethnic, multi-confessional empire; and the role of the radical intelligentsia in Russian thought. We also will give special attention to the vexed question of Russian identity and examine how notions of Russia’s cultural heritage, mission, and position between Europe and Asia, shifted throughout the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries.

HIST0308A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0308A-S14

CRN: 21874

Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity
Please register via AMST 0308A

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0327A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327A-S14 SOAN0327B-S14 HIST0327B-S14

CRN: 22526

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest
Please register via SOAN 0327A

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0327B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327A-S14 SOAN0327B-S14 HIST0327A-S14

CRN: 22527

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest
Please register via SOAN 0327B

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

INTD0317Y-S14

CRN: 22441

Investments & Financial Mkts
Lab

Investments and Financial Markets
In this course we will consider the role that the investment process plays in society and will explore the recent growth in financial markets. We will also analyze the internal workings of markets for equities, bonds, commodities, derivatives, and foreign exchange, and discuss both their positive and negative aspects. We will employ a wide range of techniques to analyze markets, such as: valuation models and portfolio diversification in equities; the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity in bonds; fundamental analysis and technical analysis in commodities; interest rate parity and purchasing power parity in the foreign exchange; and options pricing model in derivatives. The course will conclude with a discussion of whether these markets are helping or hurting society, and how they might be modified. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

INTD0317Z-S14

CRN: 22442

Investments & Financial Mkts
Lab

Investments and Financial Markets
In this course we will consider the role that the investment process plays in society and will explore the recent growth in financial markets. We will also analyze the internal workings of markets for equities, bonds, commodities, derivatives, and foreign exchange, and discuss both their positive and negative aspects. We will employ a wide range of techniques to analyze markets, such as: valuation models and portfolio diversification in equities; the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity in bonds; fundamental analysis and technical analysis in commodities; interest rate parity and purchasing power parity in the foreign exchange; and options pricing model in derivatives. The course will conclude with a discussion of whether these markets are helping or hurting society, and how they might be modified. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

JAPN0230A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0230A-S14

CRN: 22443

Rethinking the Body in Japan

Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan - In English
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies.

LNGT0201A-S14

CRN: 22044

Intro to Romance Ling

Introduction to Romance Linguistics
This course welcomes students and speakers of French, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish who are curious about linguistics and wish to undertake a comparative study of the Romance linguistic family as a whole. We shall review the basic principles and methods of the linguistic science and immediately apply them to the rich and fascinating data drawn from the history of the Romance languages. Through alternating internal (structural) and external (socio-cultural) approaches to the study of languages, our goal is to construct a coherent vision of unity and diversity that at once characterize the native languages of more than 900 million speakers worldwide. (LNGT 0101 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNGT0270A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CHNS0270A-S14

CRN: 21435

Chinese Sociolinguistics
Please register via CHNS 0270A

Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver)

PGSE0103A-S14

CRN: 20471

Beginning Portuguese III

This course is a continuation of Portuguese 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and speaking. (PGSE 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

PGSE0405A-S14

CRN: 22479

Narratives from the Margin

Narratives from the Margins: Occupying Minds
In this course we will investigate the narratives that marginal voices create in order to symbolically occupy a "space" in society. Taking, as our starting point, the concept of ocupação developed by the MST (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra), we will focus on marginal groups composing of Brazilian society, such as landless workers, inmates, or favelado. We will also analyze literary and filmic texts that express dissident viewpoints in the 20th century as well as the contemporary scene. In conjunction with these texts, we will discuss an array of online articles that deal with analyzed authors and/or issues that serve as context and counterpoint to these narratives. Texts analyzed will include Tetê Moraes's and Paulo Sacramento's documentaries, MST's poetry and songs, inmates' literature, or Carolina Maria de Jesus's narratives. (PGSE 0320 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PSCI0102X-S14

CRN: 21909

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Y-S14

CRN: 21319

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Z-S14

CRN: 21320

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0242A-S14

CRN: 22277

International Politics and WMD

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304A-S14

CRN: 20638

Internatl Political Economy

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311X-S14

CRN: 22195

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0344A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0444A-S14

CRN: 22199

Race, Sex, & the Constitution

Race, Sex, and the Constitution
In this course we will examine how courts in America have framed and decided cases involving sex and race. We will consider issues such as sex discrimination, birth control and abortion, and sexual orientation, as well as the Court's doctrine concerning heightened levels of scrutiny for suspect classifications and fundamental rights. Course readings will consist of Supreme Court decisions, relevant state supreme court and lower federal court decisions on same sex marriage, and scholarly commentary. We will examine both the legitimacy and the efficacy of judicial power in these areas. Seniors needing to fulfill a political science seminar requirement may arrange with the instructor to do so. (PSCI 0102) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0368A-S14

CRN: 22200

Frontiers in Political Science

Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0421A-S14

CRN: 21368

American Environ Politics

American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting, interest groups, and political parties) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states and corporate social responsibility. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

RELI0121A-S14

CRN: 22325

Buddhist Traditions in India

Buddhist Traditions in India AT
An introduction to the development of Indian Buddhist thought, practice, and institutions. The course will begin with an examination of the life of the Buddha and the formation of the early tradition. It will then explore developments from early Nikaya Buddhism, through the rise of the Mahayana, and culminating in Tantric Buddhism. Attention will be given throughout to parallel evolutions of doctrine, practice, and the path to Nirvana. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RELI0180X-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0180X-S14

CRN: 21372

Intro to Biblical Literature
Discussion

An Introduction to Biblical Literature ST, WT
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

RELI0180Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0180Y-S14

CRN: 21373

Intro to Biblical Literature
Discussion

An Introduction to Biblical Literature ST, WT
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

RELI0180Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0180Z-S14

CRN: 21384

Intro to Biblical Literature
Discussion

An Introduction to Biblical Literature ST, WT
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

RELI0236A-S14

CRN: 22211

Byzantium & Orthodox Church

Byzantium & the Tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church ST, WT
This course is an introduction to Orthodox Christianity as reflected in the Greek, Slavic, and Near Eastern churches. We will examine the origins of the Orthodox tradition in the early Church, its centrality in the Byzantine empire, and the division between East and West. We will study key doctrinal and theological issues such as Christology and Incarnation, the Holy Trinity and the Theotokos (Mother of God), and the divine potential of human nature. We will also look at the liturgical experience that defines Orthodoxy as a living tradition, including the veneration of icons, the role of saints and monasticism, the significance of prayer and the sacraments. Readings include both church Fathers and mystics, as well as modern theologians and philosophers. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RELI0254A-S14

CRN: 22214

Islam in South Asia

Islam in South Asia AT
Islam has played a significant role in shaping the culture and politics of South Asia, from the seventh century to the present. In this course we will consider the historical, socio-cultural, religious, and political impact of Islam in South Asia. We will begin with the introduction of Islam into the South Asian landscape, covering a range of historical moments, including the Delhi Sultanate, the rise of Mughal rule, colonial interactions, and the development of new nation states. We will then examine Islam as it is lived, practiced, and experienced in contemporary South Asia, focusing on themes such as mysticism and sainthood; issues of gender; and Hindu-Muslim encounters. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RELI0341A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0341A-S14

CRN: 21797

Gender Sexuality S. Asian Rel

Gender and Sexuality in South Asian Religions
In this course we will focus on historical and ethnographic scholarship on Hinduism and Islam in South Asia. We will initially draw on the theories of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and third world feminists to examine issues of gender and sexuality. Then we will examine a range of case studies—including colonial interpretations of the Hindu practices of sati, the experiences of devadasis in Telugu south India, an account of a female Muslim healer in Hyderabad, and the religious practices of third-gendered hijras—to address how gender and sexuality are constructed in the religious landscape of South Asian Hinduism and Islam. Prior study of religion or women’s and gender studies is required. 3 hrs. sem.

RELI0350A-S14

CRN: 21402

Mystical Tradition of Islam

Sufism: The Mystical Tradition of Islam
In this seminar, we will start our adventure in the Sufi world by focusing on the historical and religious contexts in which the mystical tradition of Islam developed during the early Islamic centuries. We will then turn to the so-called classical period focusing on the institutionalization of Sufism, major themes of the classical Sufi literature; fundamental teachings and practices of Sufis; and important figures like Rumi, Ibn Arabi, and Hafez. Finally, we will move to the modern period to discuss the ways in which the Sufi tradition has been re-interpreted, contested, or transformed throughout the Muslim world in response to the challenges of modernity. In all this, our main concern will be to develop an understanding of the mystical perspective that has influenced the outlook of much of the world's diverse Muslim population. Requires familiarity with the Islamic tradition. 3 hrs. sem.

RELI0400A-S14

CRN: 21060

Seminar: Study of Religion

Seminar on the Study of Religion
This seminar for advanced religion majors examines important and influential theories and methods in the study of religion. (Open to junior and senior religion majors or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

SOAN0103X-S14

CRN: 20142

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Discussion

Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0103Y-S14

CRN: 20143

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Discussion

Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0105A-S14

CRN: 20547

Society and the Individual

Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. (Not open to second semester juniors or seniors without approval) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (Sociology)

SOAN0159Y-S14

CRN: 22221

Human Origins and Biodiversity
Discussion

Human Origins, Culture, and Biodiversity
This course will provide an overview of the field of physical anthropology. The topics to be addressed include the mechanisms of genetics and evolution, human variability and adaptation, our primate relatives and fossil ancestors (hominins), as well as bioarchaeology. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will explore human origins and the overall development of the species through time. Likewise, we will look at how language, art, and religion emerge as well as the interplay between environment and biology in human evolution. The course finishes by examining contemporary issues in human biodiversity, from molecular genetics and biotechnology to problematic categories like race, gender, and sexuality. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. (Anthropology)

SOAN0159Z-S14

CRN: 22222

Human Origins and Biodiversity
Discussion

Human Origins, Culture, and Biodiversity
This course will provide an overview of the field of physical anthropology. The topics to be addressed include the mechanisms of genetics and evolution, human variability and adaptation, our primate relatives and fossil ancestors (hominins), as well as bioarchaeology. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will explore human origins and the overall development of the species through time. Likewise, we will look at how language, art, and religion emerge as well as the interplay between environment and biology in human evolution. The course finishes by examining contemporary issues in human biodiversity, from molecular genetics and biotechnology to problematic categories like race, gender, and sexuality. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. (Anthropology)

SOAN0230A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0230A-S14

CRN: 22444

Rethinking the Body in Japan
Please register via JAPN 0230A

Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan - In English
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. (Anthropology)

SOAN0288A-S14

CRN: 22529

Deviance and Social Control

Deviance and Social Control
This course will introduce students to sociological perspectives on the nature, causes and control of deviant behavior and populations. We will consider, historically and theoretically, the construction of deviance, the social purpose it serves, and the societal response deviance engenders. We will pay special attention to the ways in which the deviant body is constructed and managed through a variety of frameworks – including medical, punitive and therapeutic - and reflect critically on the social and political ramifications of the categorizations “deviant” and “normal”. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

SOAN0306A-S14

CRN: 21256

Topics Anthropology Theory

Topics in Anthropological Theory
This course gives an introduction to some important themes in the development of anthropological thought, primarily in the past century in anglophone and francophone traditions. It emphasizes close comparative reading of selections from influential texts by authors who have shaped recent discourse within the social sciences. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0327A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327B-S14 HIST0327A-S14 HIST0327B-S14

CRN: 22225

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

SOAN0327B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327A-S14 HIST0327A-S14 HIST0327B-S14

CRN: 22226

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

SOAN0495A-S14

CRN: 22367

Language and the Environment

Language and the Environment
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. (SOAN 0103 and a 0100-level LNGT or ENVS course) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

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