Middlebury

Ross Dining Hall
160 HMKL Way
Middlebury, VT
United States

Ross Dining Hall was the first Commons dining hall to be built. It features open cooking areas, including a Mongolian grill, regular grill, salad bar, and carving station.  Ross is a center for big Commons events such as Viva Ross Vegas. Downstairs is a "smart" classroom also used frequently for lectures and lunchtime meetings for employers and student clubs, as well as the Ross Commons offices, where Commons meetings are held.

History

Ross opened in fall 2002.

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Departments

Courses

AMST0227A-S14

CRN: 22301

Asian Americas

Asian Americas
In this course we will investigate cultural transformations, cultural politics, and the cultural productions of and about Asian Americans. The themes of immigration, nation, and citizenship are central to the construction of the U.S. racial category of Asian. Those addressed within the category are highly diverse and differentiated along class, gender, and generational lines, yet the racial category structures particular kinds of experiences and possibilities for subjects. Historical transformations and contemporary issues in a variety of Asian American contexts will be investigated through a variety of texts including historical accounts, cultural studies, anthropological studies, autobiography, and fiction. 3 hrs. lect.

ARBC0103A-S14

CRN: 20370

Beginning Arabic III

Beginning Arabic III
This course is a continuation of ARBC 0102. 6 hrs. lect/disc (ARBC 0102 or equivalent)

ARBC0103B-S14

CRN: 20710

Beginning Arabic III

Beginning Arabic III
This course is a continuation of ARBC 0102. 6 hrs. lect/disc (ARBC 0102 or equivalent)

CHEM0313A-S14

CRN: 20408

Biochemistry Laboratory

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

EDST0318A-S14

CRN: 21236

Middle/Secondary Ed Methods

Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools
This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary for effective teaching at the secondary level. Starting from a foundation in the liberal arts, students will develop lesson and unit plans based on instructional models that reflect "best practice" and that are grounded in key concepts from their respective disciplines. Concerns regarding "classroom management" will be addressed as opportunities to design challenging and engaging curriculum. Students will be required to integrate technology into meaningful, academic inquiry. This course requires 3 hrs/week of observation in local schools. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0304A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S14 SOAN0304B-S14 GSFS0304B-S14

CRN: 22244

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please register via SOAN 0304A

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0304B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S14 SOAN0304B-S14 GSFS0304A-S14

CRN: 22245

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please register via SOAN 0304B

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0320A-S14

CRN: 22248

Topics in Feminist Theory

Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. Each semester the instructor will choose a particular topical lens through which to examine some of the foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

RELI0236Y-S14

CRN: 22212

Byzantium & Orthodox Church
Discussion

Byzantium & the Tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church ST, WT
This course is an introduction to Orthodox Christianity as reflected in the Greek, Slavic, and Near Eastern churches. We will examine the origins of the Orthodox tradition in the early Church, its centrality in the Byzantine empire, and the division between East and West. We will study key doctrinal and theological issues such as Christology and Incarnation, the Holy Trinity and the Theotokos (Mother of God), and the divine potential of human nature. We will also look at the liturgical experience that defines Orthodoxy as a living tradition, including the veneration of icons, the role of saints and monasticism, the significance of prayer and the sacraments. Readings include both church Fathers and mystics, as well as modern theologians and philosophers. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RELI0236Z-S14

CRN: 22213

Byzantium & Orthodox Church
Discussion

Byzantium & the Tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church ST, WT
This course is an introduction to Orthodox Christianity as reflected in the Greek, Slavic, and Near Eastern churches. We will examine the origins of the Orthodox tradition in the early Church, its centrality in the Byzantine empire, and the division between East and West. We will study key doctrinal and theological issues such as Christology and Incarnation, the Holy Trinity and the Theotokos (Mother of God), and the divine potential of human nature. We will also look at the liturgical experience that defines Orthodoxy as a living tradition, including the veneration of icons, the role of saints and monasticism, the significance of prayer and the sacraments. Readings include both church Fathers and mystics, as well as modern theologians and philosophers. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SOAN0304A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304B-S14 GSFS0304A-S14 GSFS0304B-S14

CRN: 22223

Gender, Culture, and Power

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

SOAN0304B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S14 GSFS0304A-S14 GSFS0304B-S14

CRN: 22224

Gender, Culture, and Power

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

Social

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