Middlebury

Atwater Residence Halls
Middlebury, VT
United States

Modeled after Painter Hall, the oldest building of the College, Atwater Residence Halls are the newest residences on campus. With 175 beds between them, they provide many spacious suites with common rooms and some kitchens, as well as many singles. They also have a laundry facility, a "smart" classroom, and a study lounge for the entire commons.

History

The Atwater Residences opened in the fall of 2004.

Type of Housing

Senior Housing

Features

Atwater A: 18 suites total, 12 singles, seminar room, elevator, bike room, laundry. Suites A, C, B, D, E, F: (4 singles, bathroom, common area, refrigerator), Suites G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R: (4 singles, bathroom, common area, full kitchen)

Atwater B: 15 suites total, 8 singles, common study, library, elevator. Suite A: (3 singles, bathroom, common area, full kitchen), Suites B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, N, O: (4 singles, bathroom, common area, full kitchen), Suites E, I, M: (5 singles, bathroom, common area, full kitchen)

Room Videos

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Departments

Courses

EDST0102A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0102A-S14

CRN: 22119

English Lang in Global Context
Please register via WRPR 0102A

English Language in Global Context
In this course, we will discuss and write about the dominance of English in the global landscape. The course reader, The Handbook of World Englishes (2006), offers an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. We will begin the course with a geographic and historical overview of World Englishes and then will examine the impact of English language dominance on individuals and societies, emphasizing themes such as migration, globalization, education, and identity. Throughout the course, we will explore the relevance of these issues to educators, linguists, and policy-makers around the world.

EDST0210A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0210A-S14

CRN: 22432

Sophomore Seminar/Liberal Arts
Please register via INTD 0210A

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived.

HIST0113X-S14

CRN: 22145

History of Africa to 1800
Discussion

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0113Y-S14

CRN: 22146

History of Africa to 1800
Discussion

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0113Z-S14

CRN: 22147

History of Africa to 1800
Discussion

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

INTD0210A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0210A-S14

CRN: 22380

Sophomore Seminar/Liberal Arts

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP (J. Miller-Lane; P. Zupan)

SOAN0353A-S14

CRN: 22227

Anthropology Muslim Cultures

Islam in Practice: Anthropology of Muslim Cultures
In this course, we will explore Muslim cultures across the world. We will approach Islam from an anthropological, as opposed to a text-based or theological, perspective. We will take a global view, focusing not only on the Middle East but on Muslim societies in North America, Europe, Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and South-East Asia. Topics we will cover include: (1) the diversity of Muslim identity and practice; (2) the impact of colonialism and empire on Muslim societies; (3) women's experiences of Islam; and (4) the politics of religious practice. (Prior coursework in anthropology, sociology, or religion recommended) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SPAN0103C-S14

CRN: 21992

Beginning Spanish III

Beginning Spanish III
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

SPAN0309A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0399A-S14

CRN: 22545

Representing Hispanic Theatre

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will both study and perform a selected play from Spain or Latin America. The first half of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of the selected play. We will complement our study with readings on semiotics and performance studies, other works by the author, other plays, and texts on relevant socio-historical and political topics. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to preparing a full production of the play to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about three hours of rehearsal time per week outside of class. Through performance students will find deeper meaning in the literary text. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver; this course is also being offered as SPAN 0399) 3 hrs. lect./disc/rehearsal

SPAN0399A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0309A-S14

CRN: 22499

Representing Hispanic Theatre

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will both study and perform a selected play from Spain or Latin America. The first half of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of the selected play. We will complement our study with readings on semiotics and performance studies, other works by the author, other plays, and texts on relevant socio-historical and political topics. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to preparing a full production of the play to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about three hours of rehearsal time per week outside of class. Through performance students will find deeper meaning in the literary text. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver; this course is also being offered as SPAN 0309) 3 hrs. lect./disc/rehearsal

WRPR0102A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0102A-S14

CRN: 22069

English Lang in Global Context

English Language in Global Context
In this course, we will discuss and write about the dominance of English in the global landscape. The course reader, The Handbook of World Englishes (2006), offers an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. We will begin the course with a geographic and historical overview of World Englishes and then will examine the impact of English language dominance on individuals and societies, emphasizing themes such as migration, globalization, education, and identity. Throughout the course, we will explore the relevance of these issues to educators, linguists, and policy-makers around the world.

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