Middlebury

Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest
531 College St.
Middlebury, VT
United States

Hillcrest is currently undergoing renovations to become the new center for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Affairs. It is hoped that upon completion the building will receive at least a silver LEED rating, a sign of environmentally responsible design and execution. The new center will include 14 offices, a studio, study, lounge and teaching space, as well as informal meeting areas for students and faculty. The main component of the addition will be a technologically advanced lecture hall that seats up to 100. The hall will provide space for the weekly Howard E. Woodin Environmental Studies Colloquium Series, which is a key component of the environmental studies program. A landscaped courtyard will be constructed in an area that is currently a parking lot to the southwest of the building. Access to the building will be made from the east and the west through covered porches into an entrance lobby, where a new elevator will be installed. It is due to open in the fall of 2007.

History

Hillcrest started out as a student residence in the form of Victorian farmhouse. An annex was eventually added onto the building to house a classroom as well as several offices, though the annex has now been taken down and recycled. In recent years, it was home to several language departments' offices as well as a three-person apartment.

Murmur

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Courses

CMLT0101Z-S14

CRN: 21409

Intro to World Literature
Discussion

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0299A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299A-S14

CRN: 22046

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299A

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ECON0155E-S14

CRN: 21003

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

EDST0105A-S14

CRN: 22555

Education for Sustainability

Foundations of Education for Sustainability
In this course we will examine how Education for Sustainability (EFS) has become an interdisciplinary field that embodies a holistic and critical approach to the role of education in informing human interactions with the environment and the economy through the lens of equity & social justice. We will use place-based education as our context and service-learning as our pedagogy, while sustainable communities will remain our overarching goal. In collaboration with a community partner, students will identify an authentic need in Addison County and design and participate in EFS through a community-based project. This course will take an active approach to learning and will consist of activities, workshops, projects, and guest speakers, to provide students the opportunity to experience EFS in practice. 3 hrs. lect.

ENVS0112A-S14

CRN: 20228

Natural Science & Environment

Natural Science and the Environment
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

ENVS0211A-S14

CRN: 21744

Conservation & Env Policy

Conservation and Environmental Policy
In this course we will examine conversation and environmental policy in the United States. We will begin by motivating the need for conservation and environmental policy and providing a brief history of environmental policy in the U.S. Next we will focus on the issue of local versus national control in governing environmental and conservation issues. We will then cover the process of policy design, implementation, and enforcement. Finally, we will explore benefit-cost analysis and the evaluation of public policies. The course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions related to the assigned readings and current environmental policy issues. 3 hrs. lect.

ENVS0390A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0390A-S14

CRN: 22315

Env Negotiation/Dispute Res
Please register via PSCI 0390A

Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of environmental negotiation and dispute resolution as applied to public policy at both the domestic and international levels. We will consider the mutual gains approach to negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and dispute systems design. We will grapple with challenging features typical of environmental negotiations, such as the large number of stakeholders involved, scientific uncertainty, and value differences. We will undertake role-playing simulations. Throughout, we will think critically about the negotiating styles and assumptions employed by both seminar participants and those presented in course materials. (Junior or Senior standing; Sophomores by approval; ENVS 0211 or IGST 0101 or PSCI 0109). 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

ENVS0401A-S14

CRN: 20239

Environmental Studies Sr Sem

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar
A single environmental topic will be explored through reading, discussion, and individual research. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on issues with relevance to the local region and with interdisciplinary dimensions, such as temperate forests, lake ecosystems, or public lands policy. The class involves extensive reading, student-led discussions, and a collaborative research project. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab

ENVS0401B-S14

CRN: 21882

Environmental Studies Sr Sem

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar
A single environmental topic will be explored through reading, discussion, and individual research. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on issues with relevance to the local region and with interdisciplinary dimensions, such as temperate forests, lake ecosystems, or public lands policy. The class involves extensive reading, student-led discussions, and a collaborative research project. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab

ITAL0299A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0299A-S14

CRN: 22045

Literary Feasts

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

JAPN0217A-S14

CRN: 21296

Contemporary Japanese Fiction
Haruki Murakami&His Generation

Contemporary Japanese Fiction: Haruki Murakami and His Generation (in English)
Contemporary Japanese literature is dominated by the work of Haruki Murakami and writers who have been influenced by him. We will examine Murakami's work in detail, including A Wild Sheep Chase, Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, and Kafka on the Shore, and then look at the relationship between Murakami and other contemporary writers (Yoko Ogawa, Ryu Murakami, Natsuo Kirino). Murakami's impact on the visual arts (Takashi Murakami and "Superflat") and the wider culture will also be examined. Students will gain a strong grounding in contemporary Japanese culture through the eyes of one of its most interesting and influential practitioners.

PSCI0278A-S14

CRN: 21433

Politics of Insurgency

The Politics of Insurgency
In this course we will survey the full range of insurgencies, from violent civil wars and classic insurgencies to strategically nonviolent movements. Drawing from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, this class will work to analyze an array of research questions on why insurgencies begin, endure, and terminate. We will also consider the efficacy of different resistance methods, the role of the international community, and the impact of insurgency on post-conflict outcomes. Students will synthesize course content in a professional research analysis that provides policy prescriptions for ongoing conflicts throughout the world. (PSCI 0103 or 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0390A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0390A-S14

CRN: 22201

Env Negotiation/Dispute Res

Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of environmental negotiation and dispute resolution as applied to public policy at both the domestic and international levels. We will consider the mutual gains approach to negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and dispute systems design. We will grapple with challenging features typical of environmental negotiations, such as the large number of stakeholders involved, scientific uncertainty, and value differences. We will undertake role-playing simulations. Throughout, we will think critically about the negotiating styles and assumptions employed by both seminar participants and those presented in course materials. (Junior or Senior standing; Sophomores by approval; ENVS 0211 or IGST 0101 or PSCI 0109). 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOAN0267A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0267B-S14

CRN: 22286

Global Health

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0267B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0267A-S14

CRN: 22466

Global Health

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

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