Middlebury

Freeman International Center
203 Freeman Way
Middlebury, VT
United States

Stephen A. Freeman International Center includes classrooms and offices for the German, Russian, and Japanese Studies departments. The building also includes the Jewish Center, where students come together each week for a short Shabbat service followed by Friday evening dinner. The Jewish Center consists of a kitchen and a small meeting room used for the Jewish Center Speaker Series and weekly Hillel lunch meetings.

History

Originally constructed as the Social Dining Units designed to foster student interaction, the facility was renamed in 1993 in honor of Stephen Freeman who served as professor of French from 1925-1970.

Murmur

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Departments

Courses

CMLT0200A-S14

CRN: 21809

Folk-Fairy Tales of the World

Once Upon A Time ... Folk Fairy Tales Of The World
Tell me a story! We will examine the complex, inter-connected fairy tale traditions found in every society. Comparing fairy tale variants from around the world-including Japan, China, India, Near East, Africa-we will explore their convoluted and fertile relationships as observed in the rise of fairy tale collections in 15th-century Europe, reaching a culmination in the Brothers Grimm collection, often synonymous with the fairy tale itself. To attain a more dispassionate critical perspective we will explore theoretical approaches to the fairy tales through authors such as Zipes, Bottigheimer, Tatar, and Rölleke, and conclude by examining modern variants in prose, poetry, and film.

CMLT0358A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RUSS0358A-S14

CRN: 22355

Non-Conformism in Lit & Art
Please register via RUSS 0358A

The Art and Life of Non-Conformism in Twentieth-Century America and Russia (in English)
In this course we will explore the artistic production of Non-Conformists in 20th century Russia and America. Starting with the Russian Futurists, who stood behind the Soviet Revolution, we will consider how literature and art moved into the dissident realm as the new Soviet state increased its pressure to conform. We will read works by Russian dissidents within the Soviet Union and those written by political émigrés. We will compare these works to those by American non-conformists, including the New Orleans Second Line parades, Hobo, Beat Generation, Hippie, Punk, and the Burning Man cultures. 3 hrs. lect.

FYSE1198A-S14

CRN: 22283

Darwinian Medicine

Darwinian Medicine
Is it better to fight a fever or let it run its course? Why do pregnant women get morning sickness? In this course, we will look at modern humans and their health from the perspective of evolutionary biology. Students will be introduced to the basics of evolution by natural selection and will learn to interpret morphological, biochemical and behavioral aspects of humans and their pathogens in this context (such as how and why the level of virulence of a disease changes when human habits change). Readings will include Why We Get Sick, Evolving Health, and numerous papers from the primary literature. 3 hrs. sem./disc.

GRMN0103A-S14

CRN: 21246

Beginning German Continued

Beginning German Continued
This course is a continuation of GRMN 0101 and 0102. Increased emphasis on communicative competence through short oral presentations and the use of authentic German language materials (videos, songs, slides). Introduction to short prose writings and other documents relating to contemporary German culture. Five class meetings per week. (GRMN 0101 plus winter term GRMN 0102, or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect.

GRMN0103B-S14

CRN: 20465

Beginning German Continued

Beginning German Continued
This course is a continuation of GRMN 0101 and 0102. Increased emphasis on communicative competence through short oral presentations and the use of authentic German language materials (videos, songs, slides). Introduction to short prose writings and other documents relating to contemporary German culture. Five class meetings per week. (GRMN 0101 plus winter term GRMN 0102, or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect.

GRMN0111A-S14

CRN: 20731

Accelerated Beginning German

Accelerated Beginning German
This class is aimed at students who wish to begin the study of German on the fast lane. In one semester, we will cover a year's material, the equivalent of GRMN 0101, 0102, and 0103. We will develop all four skills in an intensive, immersion-style environment, allowing students to continue German in the regular second-year classes in the fall. Classes meet five times per week, including two 75-minute meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and an additional drill session. Students are expected to fully participate in all departmental activities. No prerequisites. 6 hr lect./disc./1 hr. drill

GRMN0202A-S14

CRN: 20469

Intermediate German Continued

Intermediate German Continued
GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0201) 4 hrs. lect.

GRMN0202B-S14

CRN: 20477

Intermediate German Continued

Intermediate German Continued
GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0201) 4 hrs. lect.

GRMN0360A-S14

CRN: 22136

German & Its Cultural Contexts

German in Its Cultural Contexts
The course invites students to explore the culture and civilization of the German-speaking world from hindsight. Beginning with the year 2000, we will discuss texts in reverse chronological order, allowing us to start our inquiry within the more accessible world of the present and then proceed to the less familiar past. Such an inversion will utilize our familiarity with events of the recent times to enhance comprehension of what preceded them in history. Thus, the more removed a topic is, the more insight the reader can bring to its investigation. A montage of written and visual materials will expose students to high-brow, mainstream, and marginal cultures alike. (Formerly GRMN 0310) 3 hrs. lect.

GRMN0485A-S14

CRN: 22137

Weimar Germany & Its Legacies

Weimar Germany and Its Legacies
In this course we will examine the brief and intense period of artistic creativity and political upheaval in Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic. Beginning with Germany's humiliating defeat in World War I we will discuss the implications of the Versailles Treaty, the Dolchstoß (stab-in-the-back) theory, the stillborn revolution of 1918-1919, and the growing political polarization and apathy leading to Hitler's rise to power. Contrasting the political decline with the increased in cultural productivity, we will trace the artists' outcry for spiritual rebirth, examining the development of Expressionism, Dadaism, and New Objectivity in literature, visual arts, theater, and film. Readings will include texts by Döblin, Th. Mann, V. Baum, Kracauer, Kästner, Brecht, and Hans Fallada. Special project: preparation of an art exhibit in MCA opening in fall 2014. (Formerly GRMN 0403) 3 hrs. sem.

JAPN0103X-S14

CRN: 21024

First-Year Japanese
Drill

First-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0202Y-S14

CRN: 20662

Second-Year Japanese
Drill

Second-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0201. (JAPN 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0302A-S14

CRN: 20520

Third-Year Japanese

Third-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0301. (JAPN 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0302Z-S14

CRN: 20759

Third-Year Japanese
Drill

Third-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0301. (JAPN 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0330A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0330A-S14

CRN: 22180

Global Japanese Culture

Global Japanese Culture (in English)
In this course we will examine the transformation of Japanese cultural identity (Japanese-ness) as products, ideas, and people move across the borders in and out of Japan. Social scientists have been particularly interested in the Japanizing of non-Japanese practices and products such as hip hop and hamburgers, as well as the popularity of Japanese styles and products on the global scene. We will take an anthropological approach using texts such as Millennial Monsters, Remade in Japan, and Hip Hop Japan to examine the issues of cultural hybridity, identity, and globalization.

JAPN0402A-S14

CRN: 21299

Advanced Japanese

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0401. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNGT0232A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RUSS0232A-S14

CRN: 22366

Nature and Origin of Language
Please register via RUSS 0232A

The Nature and Origin of Language
This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations.

PSCI0227X-S14

CRN: 22190

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Y-S14

CRN: 22191

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Z-S14

CRN: 22192

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0311Y-S14

CRN: 22196

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311Z-S14

CRN: 22197

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0454A-S14

CRN: 22204

Leadership Pol & Personality

Leadership: Politics and Personality
What difference do leaders make? Are leaders born or made? What accounts for effective leadership? Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies? This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) the individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

RELI0381A-S14

CRN: 22426

Seminar in the New Testament
Jesus-Ethics of the Kingdom

RUSS0103A-S14

CRN: 20373

Beginning Russian

Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0102, but with increased emphasis on reading. (RUSS 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill.

RUSS0103Y-S14

CRN: 20381

Beginning Russian
Drill

Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0102, but with increased emphasis on reading. (RUSS 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill.

RUSS0103Z-S14

CRN: 20376

Beginning Russian
Drill

Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0102, but with increased emphasis on reading. (RUSS 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill.

RUSS0122A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RUSS0122B-S14

CRN: 21679

The Russian Mind (in English)

The Russian Mind (in English)
In this course we will study the dominant themes of Russia's past and their role in shaping the present-day Russian mind. Topics will include: Slavic mythology; Russian Orthodoxy; Russian icons; the concept of autocracy; the legacy of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; the Golden Age of Russian Literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky); Russian composers, including the "Mighty Five"; Russian theater and ballet; the origins of Russian radicalism; the Russian Revolution; the legacy of Lenin and Stalin; and Russia from Khrushchev to Putin. 3 hrs. lect.

RUSS0122B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RUSS0122A-S14

CRN: 22438

The Russian Mind (in English)

The Russian Mind (in English)
In this course we will study the dominant themes of Russia's past and their role in shaping the present-day Russian mind. Topics will include: Slavic mythology; Russian Orthodoxy; Russian icons; the concept of autocracy; the legacy of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; the Golden Age of Russian Literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky); Russian composers, including the "Mighty Five"; Russian theater and ballet; the origins of Russian radicalism; the Russian Revolution; the legacy of Lenin and Stalin; and Russia from Khrushchev to Putin. 3 hrs. lect.

RUSS0202A-S14

CRN: 20411

Intermediate Russian

Intermediate Russian
Continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0201. Reading of contemporary Russian texts, conversation, and written assignments in Russian based on reading assignments. (RUSS 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

RUSS0202Z-S14

CRN: 20413

Intermediate Russian
Drill

Intermediate Russian
Continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0201. Reading of contemporary Russian texts, conversation, and written assignments in Russian based on reading assignments. (RUSS 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

RUSS0232A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0232A-S14

CRN: 22365

Nature and Origin of Language

The Nature and Origin of Language
This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations.

RUSS0312A-S14

CRN: 21376

Russ Cult and Civ II

Russian Culture and Civilization II
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0311 but may be taken independently. It offers a bilingual approach to the study of Russian culture from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present. Works of literature, art, and music will be examined in their historical and political context. Particular attention will be devoted to the improvement of oral and written skills. (RUSS 0202 or equivalent) (formerly RUSS 0412) 3 hrs. lect.

RUSS0358A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0358A-S14

CRN: 22354

Non-Conformism in Lit & Art

The Art and Life of Non-Conformism in Twentieth-Century America and Russia (in English)
In this course we will explore the artistic production of Non-Conformists in 20th century Russia and America. Starting with the Russian Futurists, who stood behind the Soviet Revolution, we will consider how literature and art moved into the dissident realm as the new Soviet state increased its pressure to conform. We will read works by Russian dissidents within the Soviet Union and those written by political émigrés. We will compare these works to those by American non-conformists, including the New Orleans Second Line parades, Hobo, Beat Generation, Hippie, Punk, and the Burning Man cultures. 3 hrs. lect.

SOAN0330A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0330A-S14

CRN: 22373

Global Japanese Culture
Please register via JAPN 0330A

Global Japanese Culture - In English
In this course we will examine the transformation of Japanese cultural identity (Japanese-ness) as products, ideas, and people move across the borders in and out of Japan. Social scientists have been particularly interested in the Japanizing of non-Japanese practices and products such as hip hop and hamburgers, as well as the popularity of Japanese styles and products on the global scene. We will take an anthropological approach using texts such as Millennial Monsters, Remade in Japan, and Hip Hop Japan to examine the issues of cultural hybridity, identity, and globalization. (Anthropology)

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