Middlebury

Gifford Hall
489 College St.
Middlebury, VT
United States

Gifford houses mostly sophomores and juniors in singles and four and five person suites. Gifford also includes the Gamut Room, a student-run cafe and performance space in the basement. The amphitheatre outside the Gamut Room is home to student performances. Gifford also contains two classrooms and a lounge. Also located in the building are the offices of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the oldest and best known conference for emerging writers in the nation, and the New England Review, a quarterly publication of short fiction.

History

With Mead Chapel and Hepburn Hall, Gifford Hall parallels Old Stone Row, and frames the upper campus. Gifford was built in 1940 as a memorial to James M. Gifford, 1877, a benefactor and trustee of the College. It houses 158 students.

Type of Housing

Sophomore and Upper-classmen Housing

Features

68 singles, 10 double, 18 Suites (Each suite contains: 2 singles, 1 double, bathroom, kitchenette. Basement suite has two doubles and 1 single), Gifford Apartment (1 single, 1 double, bathroom, kitchen, lounge, stairs), 24 bathrooms, lounges, 6 kitchens (refrigerator, stove, oven, sink, storage), study rooms, laundry room, classroom, Gamut room (http://middlebury.collegiatelink.net/organization/thegamutroom), Gannex, bike room, storage in the basement.

Features

Murmur

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Departments

Courses

ECON0150D-S14

CRN: 20252

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ITAL0103Z-S14

CRN: 21303

Intensive Beginning Italian
Screening

Intensive Beginning Italian III
This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen.

PSCI0310A-S14

CRN: 21367

American Public Policy

American Public Policy
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSYC0224A-S14

CRN: 20147

Psychological Disorders

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

PSYC0333A-S14

CRN: 22451

Environmental Psychology

Environmental Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

RELI0208A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0208A-S14

CRN: 21374

Sociology of American Religion

The Sociology of American Religion AR
The course focuses on classical and contemporary issues in the sociology of religion. We begin with definitional debates about what religion is and the strengths and limitations of a social science of religion. We then consider issues of religious commitment and conversion; the changing role and influence of religion in contemporary society (i.e., secularization theory); change in religious communities; American religious history; women, family, and religious life; and the emergence of new religious movements. Throughout the course we read ethnographic and historical studies of various religious organizations and communities (e.g., American Protestantism, the Amish, Catholicism, Hare Krishna, Shakers, Oneida, Mormons). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SOAN0208A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0208A-S14

CRN: 21375

Sociology of American Religion
Please register via RELI 0208A

The Sociology of American Religion
The course focuses on classical and contemporary issues in the sociology of religion. We begin with definitional debates about what religion is and the strengths and limitations of a social science of religion. We then consider issues of religious commitment and conversion; the changing role and influence of religion in contemporary society (i.e., secularization theory); change in religious communities; American religious history; women, family, and religious life; and the emergence of new religious movements. Throughout the course we read ethnographic and historical studies of various religious organizations and communities (e.g., American Protestantism, the Amish, Catholicism, Hare Krishna, Shakers, Oneida, Mormons). 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

SPAN0300B-S14

CRN: 20070

Intro to Hispanic Literature

An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. This course is required for Spanish majors. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Parking

Floor Plan

Social

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