Middlebury

Davis Family Library
110 Storrs Ave.
Middlebury, VT
United States

Located at the foot of the hill, the Main Library is home to more than its one million books. It houses Library & Information Services and the IT Help Desk, where students, faculty and staff can receive support for computing and technology issues. The Abernethy Library, part of the College's Special Collections, has a precious collection of American literature. It is home to the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research, an office that provides tutoring services, coordinates the writing program, and assists faculty with research techniques using the latest technology. The library also has an extensive collection of foreign language materials, and is fully wired with extensive wireless access as well. Study rooms are available for group work, some equipped with flat screens to coordinate multimedia projects, and extensive study carrels allow for quiet, private work. Yet the library is also a place of interaction, seating 30 percent of the student body at any time and housing the Wilson 24-Hour Study Cafe. In keeping with the College's One Percent for Art principle, the library has The Garden of the Seasons to read in, a large mural L'Art d'ecrire, and a variety of prints, painting, scrolls, and exhibits around the building.

History

The library was inaugurated in the fall of 2004. It stands in the site of the College's former science facility, which was taken down to be recycled and used in the construction of the current building.

Murmur

Computer Labs

Davis Family Library 105: 0 machines currently available.

Davis Family Library 140: 0 machines currently available.

Davis Family Library 220 (Wilson Media Lab): 0 machines currently available.

Davis Family Library Mobile Computer Cart

Printing

LIB 142
LIB 242 (2 printers)
LIB 303

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Departments

Courses

AMST0246A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HARC0246A-S14

CRN: 22179

American Painting to 1920
Please register via HARC 0246A

American Painting: Beginnings to the Armory Show
This course is an introduction to American painting from 17th century limner portraits to the rise of modernism in the twentieth century, with special attention to Copley, Cole, Church, Homer, Eakins, Sloan, and Bellows. Although we will trace the development of traditional categories of painting (landscape, portraiture, genre), our purpose will be to discover what the paintings tell us about the changing values and tastes of American culture. (Formerly HARC/AMCV 0246) 3 hrs. lect.

ARBC0202A-S14

CRN: 20636

Intermediate Arabic II

Intermediate Arabic II
This course is a continuation of Arabic 0201. Fifth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. (ARBC 0201 or equivalent). 6 hrs. lect/disc

ARBC0302A-S14

CRN: 20715

Advanced Arabic II

Advanced Arabic II
This course is a continuation of Arabic 0301. It aims to help students reach an advanced level of proficiency in reading, speaking, and writing Arabic, as well as to develop further an understanding of Arab culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political, and literary topics. Course will be conducted entirely in Arabic. (ARBC 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ARBC0431A-S14

CRN: 22295

Environmental Middle East

The Environmental Middle East: Forests, Rivers, and Peoples
In this course we will examine the environmental history of the Middle East and contemporary conservation practices in this region, focusing on four environmental case-studies: a contemporary conservation project in Lebanon, the Ghuta Forest of Damascus, the GAP dam project in Syria, and the marshes of Southern Iraq. We will consider these sites of contested power relations, cultural practice, and memory through the lenses of political and environmental essays, academic critiques, policy papers, historical documents, current media, and literary works. The objectives of this course: to provide students with a solid grasp of contemporary Middle Eastern environmental history, to address the key elements of cultural practice in each geographic area, and to achieve advanced proficiency in Arabic, including a mastery of environmental terminology. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem.

CHNS0220A-S14

CRN: 22304

Modern Chinese Literature

Modern China through Literature (in translation)
This course, taught in English, is a discussion-based seminar on some of the most significant works of short fiction, novellas, and novels that tell the story of China and the Chinese from the end of the Qing dynasty to the present. Students will gain a better understanding of the history of modern China by studying the works of literature that inspired readers and provoked debate during one hundred years of social reform, revolution, war, civil war, reconstruction, cultural revolution, cultural revival, and economic growth. Our reading will include work by authors such as Lu Xun (Diary of a Madman, 1918), Zhang Ailing (Love in a Fallen City, 1944), Ah Cheng (The Chess King, 1984), Yu Hua (To Live, 1993), and, from Taiwan, Zhu Tianwen (Notes of a Desolate Man, 1999). We will consider the mainstream (socially engaged realism), the avant-garde (varieties of modernism), and popular genres (romance and martial arts), and we will look for answers to the following questions: what has been the place of fiction in China in the modern era and what vision of modern China do we find in its fiction? (No prerequisites) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101A-S14

CRN: 21406

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ECON0210Y-S14

CRN: 20260

Economic Statistics
Lab ECON 0210 B

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210Z-S14

CRN: 20261

Economic Statistics
Lab ECON 0210 A

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211W-S14

CRN: 22501

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211X-S14

CRN: 20406

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Y-S14

CRN: 20407

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Z-S14

CRN: 20409

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0250A-S14

CRN: 20230

Macro Theory

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255A-S14

CRN: 20808

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255B-S14

CRN: 20807

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0430A-S14

CRN: 21413

Post-Communist Econ Transition

The Post-Communist Economic Transition
This seminar will use the “natural experiment” of the post-communist transition to better understand the origin and consequences of various economic and political institutions. Drawing on research related to China and Russia as well as other formerly communist economies in Europe and Asia, we will explore such themes as property rights reform, the finance-growth nexus, contract enforcement institutions, and the economic consequences of corruption and different political regimes. (Formerly ECON 0340) (ECON 0210 or MATH 0310 or MATH 0311 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250, or by approval)

FMMC0264A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0264A-S14

CRN: 22317

Indian Cinema Romance

Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0264A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0264A-S14

CRN: 22243

Indian Cinema Romance
Please register via FMMC 0264A

Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

HARC0246A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0246A-S14

CRN: 22078

American Painting to 1920

American Painting: Beginnings to the Armory Show
This course is an introduction to American painting from 17th century limner portraits to the rise of modernism in the twentieth century, with special attention to Copley, Cole, Church, Homer, Eakins, Sloan, and Bellows. Although we will trace the development of traditional categories of painting (landscape, portraiture, genre), our purpose will be to discover what the paintings tell us about the changing values and tastes of American culture. (Formerly HARC/AMCV 0246) 3 hrs. lect.

ITAL0355A-S14

CRN: 22047

Epoche II: Medioevo-Rinascimen

Epoche della letteratura italiana II: introduzione al Medioevo e al Rinascimento
While continuing to develop critical and analytical skills through a careful reading of excerpts from the literary masterpieces of the Italian Middle Ages and the Renaissance, students will explore the artistic representations of one of the most enduring facets of human experience: love. Love in all its nuances, as spiritual ecstasy, volatile emotion, intellectual construction, erotic drive, insane passion, and comic interaction, has in fact dominated Italian literature and culture for centuries. Why has Italian culture produced such conflicting representations of love? How do Medieval and Renaissance texts still communicate with our deepest feelings and emotions, and, in particular, with our perception of love and sexuality? Through selective readings of Medieval prose and poetry by Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch, and of Renaissance works by Machiavelli, Ariosto, and Tasso, this course will address and discuss these questions. The analysis of visual culture (medieval and Renassance art; contemporary films based on the original literary texts) will complement the readings. (ITAL 0354 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. 2 hrs. screen.

PSCI0324A-S14

CRN: 22198

Pol Development Western Europe

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

RELI0130A-S14

CRN: 22382

The Christian Tradition

The Christian Tradition WT
An introduction to the ecclesiastical and theological development of Christianity. The course will begin with the formation of doctrine in the first five centuries. Attention will then be given to the development of Roman Catholicism, the Reformation, and the rise of Protestantism. The latter part of the course will deal with the changes that have occurred in the post-Enlightenment period and end with some contemporary issues. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

WRPR0202A-S14

CRN: 21293

Writing To Heal

This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations.

Social

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