Middlebury

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
287 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury, VT
United States

McCardell Bicentennial Hall houses the departments of biology, chemistry and biochemistry, geography, geology, physics, and psychology. The building includes lecture halls, classrooms, laboratories, Armstrong Science Library, offices, and student/faculty research spaces. It also has a variety of important scientific instruments, including a rooftop observatory, a scanning electron microscope, spectrometers, an aquatic lab, and a geographic information systems lab. The building is a popular social and study space with students, having a wide variety of spacious and scenic study spots equipped with blackboards, tables, and chairs. The facade is designed to recall Old Stone Row, with the entrance shaped like Old Chapel and the side wings like Starr and Painter Halls. It is also home to the state's largest window, which looks out onto the Adirondack Mountains.

History

Bicentennial Hall opened in 1999, the year before the College's Bicentennial, hailed almost instantly as a world-class facility, including being the year 2000's Lab of the Year (R&D Magazine), the only undergraduate building ever to receive the most coveted facility honor in science and engineering. It was renamed the John M. McCardell, Jr. Bicentennial Hall in May 2004, after an anonymous donor recognized the service of outgoing president John McCardell by giving $50 million to the College.

Murmur

Computer Labs

McCardell Bicentennial Hall 116/117: 0 machines currently available.

McCardell Bicentennial Hall 161: 0 machines currently available.

Printing

MBH 117
Armstrong 202
Armstrong 203K

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Departments

Courses

AMST0218A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0218A-S14

CRN: 22077

Cultural Geography
Please register via GEOG 0218A

Cultural Geography
What do landscapes mean? How are places created and invested with significance? Why do people struggle to control public and private space? In this course we will examine these and similar questions. The main goals are to illuminate the wealth of meanings embodied in the built environment and our metaphorical understandings of landscape, place, space, and geographical identity, and to teach skills for interpreting and representing those meanings. Lectures, course readings, small-group projects, and papers will draw on social theory and empirical approaches, with a regional emphasis on North America. 3 hrs. lect.

BIOL0140A-S14

CRN: 21009

Ecology and Evolution

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0140U-S14

CRN: 21928

Ecology and Evolution
Ecology and Evolution Lab

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0140V-S14

CRN: 21010

Ecology and Evolution
Ecology and Evolution Lab

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0140W-S14

CRN: 21011

Ecology and Evolution
Ecology and Evolution Lab

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0140X-S14

CRN: 21012

Ecology and Evolution
Ecology and Evolution Lab

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0140Z-S14

CRN: 21014

Ecology and Evolution
Ecology and Evolution Lab

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145A-S14

CRN: 20998

Cell Biology and Genetics

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145U-S14

CRN: 21062

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145V-S14

CRN: 21015

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145W-S14

CRN: 21019

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145X-S14

CRN: 21021

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145Y-S14

CRN: 21345

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0145Z-S14

CRN: 21022

Cell Biology and Genetics
Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0202A-S14

CRN: 21314

Comparative Vertebrate Biology

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0202Y-S14

CRN: 21326

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
Comparative Vert. Biology Lab

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0202Z-S14

CRN: 21327

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
Comparative Vert. Biology Lab

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

BIOL0216A-S14

CRN: 20753

Animal Behavior

Animal Behavior
The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics include behaviorism, intelligence, and sociobiology, analytical methods from tracking animals in the field to computerized motion analysis in the lab are utilized, and students design their own research projects. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs lab

BIOL0216Y-S14

CRN: 20754

Animal Behavior
Animal Behavior Lab

Animal Behavior
The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics include behaviorism, intelligence, and sociobiology, analytical methods from tracking animals in the field to computerized motion analysis in the lab are utilized, and students design their own research projects. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs lab

BIOL0216Z-S14

CRN: 20755

Animal Behavior
Animal Behavior Lab

Animal Behavior
The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics include behaviorism, intelligence, and sociobiology, analytical methods from tracking animals in the field to computerized motion analysis in the lab are utilized, and students design their own research projects. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs lab

BIOL0314A-S14

CRN: 20461

Molecular Genetics

Molecular Genetics
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab.

BIOL0314X-S14

CRN: 21257

Molecular Genetics
Pre-Lab

Molecular Genetics
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab.

BIOL0314Z-S14

CRN: 20462

Molecular Genetics
Molecular Genetics Lab

Molecular Genetics
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab.

BIOL0323A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
BIOL0323B-S14

CRN: 20999

Plant Community Ecology

Plant Community Ecology
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

BIOL0323B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
BIOL0323A-S14

CRN: 21177

Plant Community Ecology

Plant Community Ecology
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

BIOL0323Y-S14

CRN: 21000

Plant Community Ecology
Plant Community Ecology Lab

Plant Community Ecology
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

BIOL0323Z-S14

CRN: 21001

Plant Community Ecology
Plant Community Ecology Lab

Plant Community Ecology
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

BIOL0392A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
BIOL0392B-S14

CRN: 21480

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology
This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite courses. (BIOL 0140)

BIOL0392B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
BIOL0392A-S14

CRN: 22013

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology
This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite courses. (BIOL 0140)

BIOL0450A-S14

CRN: 22102

Topics Reproductive Medicine

Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies. Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period. Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver)

BIOL0475A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0475A-S14

CRN: 22103

Neuroplasticity

Neuroplasticity
In order for the brain to encode, process, and retain new information, it must constantly change. Neuroplasticity refers to this capacity of the central nervous system to modify its organization in response to endogenous or environmental stimuli. In this course we will discuss the molecular and cellular basis of multiple forms of neuroplasticity within the adult brain (e.g., LTP, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis) and examine how neuroplasticity contributes to learning and memory, neural regeneration following injury, and various neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and depression). (BIOL 0216 or BIOL 0370 or PSYC 301) 3hrs sem.

BIOL0490A-S14

CRN: 21805

Seminar in Plant Ecology

Seminar in Plant Ecology
Global climate change has led to a huge effort to collect data on the state of the planet, including measurements of temperature, atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, and species distributions and phenologies. Ecologists have never had access to such quantities of data, and thus need new methods for their description and analysis. In this course we will explore how to use statistical models to make sense of these data: how to develop, choose, and fit the best model for a particular data set. The course will be project-based, culminate in an independent project, and use the statistical software, R. (BIOL 0140 and one statistics course required, no R experience required.) 3 hr. sem./3 hr. lab

BIOL0490Z-S14

CRN: 21897

Seminar in Plant Ecology
Seminar in Plant Ecology Lab

Seminar in Plant Ecology
Global climate change has led to a huge effort to collect data on the state of the planet, including measurements of temperature, atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, and species distributions and phenologies. Ecologists have never had access to such quantities of data, and thus need new methods for their description and analysis. In this course we will explore how to use statistical models to make sense of these data: how to develop, choose, and fit the best model for a particular data set. The course will be project-based, culminate in an independent project, and use the statistical software, R. (BIOL 0140 and one statistics course required, no R experience required.) 3 hr. sem./3 hr. lab

BIOL0500C-S14

CRN: 20273

Independent Study

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL0500H-S14

CRN: 20278

Independent Study

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL0500J-S14

CRN: 20788

Independent Study

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

CHEM0101A-S14

CRN: 22445

World of Chemistry

World of Chemistry
The goal of this course is to investigate how chemistry impacts our daily lives in both common and extraordinary ways. After learning basic concepts of elements, atoms, and molecules, we will explore topics in energy (petroleum, nuclear, batteries, and solar), environment (global warming and the ozone hole), health (food and drug), and art (color, conservation, and forgery detection). We will perform occasional hands-on activities.

CHEM0103A-S14

CRN: 20003

General Chemistry I

General Chemistry I
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0103T-S14

CRN: 20005

General Chemistry I
Discussion

General Chemistry I
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0103X-S14

CRN: 20010

General Chemistry I
General Chemistry I Lab

General Chemistry I
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0103Y-S14

CRN: 20011

General Chemistry I
General Chemistry I Lab

General Chemistry I
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104A-S14

CRN: 20012

General Chemistry II

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104T-S14

CRN: 21169

General Chemistry II
Discussion

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104U-S14

CRN: 21170

General Chemistry II
Discussion

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104W-S14

CRN: 20014

General Chemistry II
General Chemistry II Lab

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104X-S14

CRN: 20377

General Chemistry II
General Chemistry II Lab

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104Y-S14

CRN: 20015

General Chemistry II
General Chemistry II Lab

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0104Z-S14

CRN: 20380

General Chemistry II
General Chemistry II Lab

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242A-S14

CRN: 20384

Organic Chemistry II

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242T-S14

CRN: 21325

Organic Chemistry II
Discussion

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242U-S14

CRN: 20385

Organic Chemistry II
Discussion

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242V-S14

CRN: 20391

Organic Chemistry II
Discussion

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242W-S14

CRN: 20392

Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Lab

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242X-S14

CRN: 20387

Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Lab

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242Y-S14

CRN: 20393

Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Lab

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0242Z-S14

CRN: 20394

Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Lab

Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics covered include mechanistically complex reactions, organic synthesis, and application of molecular orbital theory to reactions. Laboratory exercises focus on synthetic techniques and structure elucidation of complex unknowns. (CHEM 0241) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

CHEM0270A-S14

CRN: 21007

Environmental Chemistry

Environmental Chemistry
In this course we will investigate fundamental physical and chemical processes within soils, natural waters, and the atmosphere that affect the fate and transport of contaminants. Processes to be studied include dissolution, volatilization, sorption, and transformation reactions. Laboratory experiments will explore laboratory, field, and computational methods for pollution monitoring, contaminant characterization, and prediction of pollution fate and transport. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab

CHEM0270Z-S14

CRN: 21008

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry Lab

Environmental Chemistry
In this course we will investigate fundamental physical and chemical processes within soils, natural waters, and the atmosphere that affect the fate and transport of contaminants. Processes to be studied include dissolution, volatilization, sorption, and transformation reactions. Laboratory experiments will explore laboratory, field, and computational methods for pollution monitoring, contaminant characterization, and prediction of pollution fate and transport. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab

CHEM0301A-S14

CRN: 22300

Medicinal Chemistry

Medicinal Chemistry
Medicinal chemistry combines organic chemistry with biochemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, medicine, and related fields both to understand disease and to develop new pharmaceutical treatments (i.e., "drugs"). As chemists we try to correlate molecular structure with biological activity. In this course we will survey the major categories of diseases, drug targets, and drugs using a case-study approach. In addition to one mid-term exam, short oral presentations, and brief written assignments, the course will culminate with small-group based final projects (oral and written) about the design, development, and proposed future directions of pharmaceutical treatments targeting a specific disease. (Formerly CHEM 0441) (CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect.

CHEM0312A-S14

CRN: 20403

Inorganic & Physical Chemistry

Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory
In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis , IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab

CHEM0312Z-S14

CRN: 20405

Inorganic & Physical Chemistry
Inorganic & Phys Chemistry Lab

Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory
In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis , IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab

CHEM0313Y-S14

CRN: 21273

Biochemistry Laboratory
Biochemistry Laboratory Lab

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

CHEM0313Z-S14

CRN: 22448

Biochemistry Laboratory
Biochemistry Laboratory Lab

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

CHEM0355A-S14

CRN: 21740

Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Chemical and Biological Sciences
In this course students will learn the central ideas that frame thermodynamics and kinetics. The application of these ideas to chemical, biological, and the environmental processes will be covered using examples such as refrigerators, heat pumps, fuel cells, bioenergetics, lipid membranes, and catalysts (including enzymes). (PHYS 0109, MATH 0122, CHEM 0242) 3 hrs lect., 1 hr disc.

CMLT0333A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GRMN0333A-S14

CRN: 22446

Dealing With The Devil

Dealing with the Devil: The "Faust" Tradition (in English)
Would you sell your soul to the devil if you could receive whatever you wanted in return? Faust made that deal for ultimate knowledge. Did he achieve his goal? Can the devil be trusted? Who wins in such a scenario: Faust or the devil? The search for knowledge and its inherent pitfalls have occupied cultures for centuries. The "Faust" Stoff emanates from a literary tradition that revolves around this search and connects it with the inexplicable forces of the supernatural. We can find "Faust" in music, literature, and the visual arts not only all over Europe, but also in the United States. This course focuses on a discussion of "Faust" in music and literature, primarily in the works of Marlowe, Goethe, Gounod, Liszt, Mann, Bulgakov, and Kerouac. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CSCI0101A-S14

CRN: 20026

The Computing Age

The Computing Age
In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" 3 hr. lect./lab

CSCI0101X-S14

CRN: 22470

The Computing Age
The Computing Age Lab

The Computing Age
In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" 3 hr. lect./lab

CSCI0101Y-S14

CRN: 22471

The Computing Age
The Computing Age Lab

The Computing Age
In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" 3 hr. lect./lab

CSCI0101Z-S14

CRN: 22472

The Computing Age
The Computing Age Lab

The Computing Age
In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" 3 hr. lect./lab

CSCI0150A-S14

CRN: 22066

Computing for the Sciences

Computing for the Sciences
In this course we will provide an introduction to the field of computer science geared towards students interested in mathematics and the natural sciences. We will study problem-solving approaches and computational techniques utilized in a variety of domains including biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Students will learn how to program in Python and other languages, how to extract information from large data sets, and how to utilize a common technique employed in scientific computation. The course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior experience with programming or computer science. 3 hrs. lect./lab

CSCI0150B-S14

CRN: 22067

Computing for the Sciences

Computing for the Sciences
In this course we will provide an introduction to the field of computer science geared towards students interested in mathematics and the natural sciences. We will study problem-solving approaches and computational techniques utilized in a variety of domains including biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Students will learn how to program in Python and other languages, how to extract information from large data sets, and how to utilize a common technique employed in scientific computation. The course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior experience with programming or computer science. 3 hrs. lect./lab

CSCI0200A-S14

CRN: 21348

Math Foundations of Computing

Mathematical Foundations of Computing
In this course we will provide an introduction to the mathematical foundations of computer science, with an emphasis on formal reasoning. Topics will include propositional and predicate logic, sets, functions, and relations; basic number theory; mathematical induction and other proof methods; combinatorics, probability, and recurrence relations; graph theory; and models of computation. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level previously or concurrently; formerly CSCI 0102) 3 hrs. lect./lab

CSCI0201A-S14

CRN: 20062

Data Structures

Data Structures
In this course we will study the ideas and structures helpful in designing algorithms and writing programs for solving large, complex problems. The Java programming language and object-oriented paradigm are introduced in the context of important abstract data types (ADTs) such as stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. We will study efficient implementations of these ADTs, and learn classic algorithms to manipulate these structures for tasks such as sorting and searching. Prior programming experience is expected, but prior familiarity with the Java programming language is not assumed. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) 3 hrs. lect./lab

CSCI0302A-S14

CRN: 20418

Algorithms and Complexity

Algorithms and Complexity
This course focuses on the development of correct and efficient algorithmic solutions to computational problems, and on the underlying data structures to support these algorithms. Topics include computational complexity, analysis of algorithms, proof of algorithm correctness, advanced data structures such as balanced search trees, and also important algorithmic techniques including greedy and dynamic programming. The course complements the treatment of NP-completeness in CSCI 0301. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CSCI0465A-S14

CRN: 22435

Information Visualization

Information Visualization
Information visualization is used to reveal patterns, trends, and outliers within abstract data. In this course we will cover topics such as the transformation of data to visual representations, common approaches to dealing with different types of data, perceptual issues that govern how visualizations are interpreted, and the development of interactive visualization tools. This course will culminate in a significant final visualization project. (CSCI 0201)

CSCI0702A-S14

CRN: 20629

Senior Seminar

Senior Seminar
Each student will complete a major capstone project in this course. This project can take the form of either (1) a thesis on a topic chosen with the advice of a faculty member, or (2) a group programming project approved by the computer science faculty. All students will present their work at the end of the semester. In addition, during the academic year, all seniors are expected to attend a series of lectures designed to introduce and integrate ideas of computer science not covered in other coursework. 3 hrs. lect./disc

EDST0300A-S14

CRN: 22120

Models of Inclusive Education

Models of Inclusive Education
In this course we will focus on strategies and techniques for including students with diverse learning styles in general education environments. Legal, theoretical, philosophical, and programmatic changes leading toward inclusive models of education will be approached through a historical overview of special education for students with disabilities. Additionally, the course works to expand notions of inclusion such that students' multiple identities are incorporated into all learning. Emphasis is given to the active learning models and differentiated curriculum and instruction to accommodate a range of learners with diverse disabilities, abilities, and identities.

EDST0315A-S14

CRN: 21234

Elem Mathematics and Science

Teaching of Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School
This course is an examination of current theory, research, methods, and materials of elementary school mathematics and science. In addition to the classes and lab, students will participate in a field experience of observing and helping out in elementary school classes in the Middlebury area (approximately 24 hours). Development of an individual education studies website will also be required. Students will construct a working knowledge of assessment and the scope and sequence of mathematics and science skills, concepts, and dispositions; how children learn mathematics and science; effective teaching skills and strategies; and the role of the national and Vermont standards in teaching and learning mathematics and science. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

EDST0315Z-S14

CRN: 21235

Elem Mathematics and Science
Lab

Teaching of Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School
This course is an examination of current theory, research, methods, and materials of elementary school mathematics and science. In addition to the classes and lab, students will participate in a field experience of observing and helping out in elementary school classes in the Middlebury area (approximately 24 hours). Development of an individual education studies website will also be required. Students will construct a working knowledge of assessment and the scope and sequence of mathematics and science skills, concepts, and dispositions; how children learn mathematics and science; effective teaching skills and strategies; and the role of the national and Vermont standards in teaching and learning mathematics and science. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

ENVS0112W-S14

CRN: 21033

Natural Science & Environment
Natural Sci & Enviornment Lab

Natural Science and the Environment
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

ENVS0112X-S14

CRN: 20229

Natural Science & Environment
Natural Sci & Environment Lab

Natural Science and the Environment
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

ENVS0112Y-S14

CRN: 20231

Natural Science & Environment
Natural Sci & Environment Lab

Natural Science and the Environment
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

ENVS0112Z-S14

CRN: 20233

Natural Science & Environment
Natural Sci & Environment Lab

Natural Science and the Environment
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0264A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0264A-S14

CRN: 22317

Indian Cinema Romance

Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

FYSE1260A-S14

CRN: 22265

Holocaust Landscapes

Holocaust Landscapes
The Holocaust was a profoundly geographical event that caused mass displacement and migration, destroyed or fundamentally changed communities, and created new places to control, exploit, or kill millions of people. In this seminar we will focus on material and mental landscapes – the places and spaces – of the Holocaust, particularly as victims experienced these landscapes, and how such landscapes have been selectively re-imagined as sites of memory. History, geography, autobiography, and visual sources will provide material for class discussion, research, and writing. 3 hrs. sem.

FYSE1406A-S14

CRN: 22274

Food Battles

Food Battles: A Critical Look at Food in Our Lives
The development of high yield agricultural practices have allowed people to migrate en masse to cities with the opportunity for different lifestyles. It also meant the birth of “big business food” and some highly unethical practices. In response, the government established the FDA; but does it truly help the health of the nation? In this course we will examine commercial food from field to table, giving special attention to controversies such as genetically modified food, use of pesticides, food additives (including sugar and salt), and animal welfare issues. We will discuss the FDA’s role in safeguarding the public and whether the food industry is anything more than a profit-making business. 3 hrs. sem.

GEOG0100A-S14

CRN: 21619

Place And Society

Place and Society: Local to Global
This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0100Y-S14

CRN: 21620

Place And Society
Place And Society Lab

Place and Society: Local to Global
This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0100Z-S14

CRN: 21621

Place And Society
Place And Society Lab

Place and Society: Local to Global
This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0120A-S14

CRN: 21717

Fundamentals of GIS

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (first semester first-year students and seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

GEOG0120W-S14

CRN: 21904

Fundamentals of GIS
Fundamentals of GIS Lab

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (first semester first-year students and seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

GEOG0120X-S14

CRN: 21905

Fundamentals of GIS
Fundamentals of GIS Lab

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (first semester first-year students and seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

GEOG0120Y-S14

CRN: 21864

Fundamentals of GIS
Fundamentals of GIS Lab

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (first semester first-year students and seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

GEOG0120Z-S14

CRN: 21865

Fundamentals of GIS
Fundamentals of GIS Lab

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (first semester first-year students and seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

GEOG0207A-S14

CRN: 22087

Resource Wars

Resource Wars: A Geopolitical Perspective
The world of relatively accessible natural resources is now a thing of the past. As it becomes more difficult to find secure and clean energy sources and manage chronic food and water shortages, some countries that were once politically and economically marginal will become increasingly more important. And as another billion people will be added to the world's population, the fight for resources will become ever fiercer. These will result in further erosion of personal and states' securities. In this course we will analyze, from a geographic perspective, the political, economic, social, and environmental dynamics of conflicts over natural resources at the local, regional, international, and intra-national scales. We will pay special attention to the ways natural resources fuel conflict. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOG0211A-S14

CRN: 22091

The Global Economy

The Global Economy
Today’s economy is increasingly global, as business functions are dispersed across many diverse spaces and at different spatial scales. In this course we will gain an understanding of the forces that combine to shape contemporary economies across space through an examination of both theoretical approaches to economic geography as well as empirical case studies. Students in the course will learn: neoclassical theories from economic geography that describe the spatial distribution of various economic activities at a local scale; how regional economies develop over time and gain/lose competitive advantage; and the origins of globalization and different strategies corporations use to expand into different areas. This course will combine lectures, hands-on exercises, and discussions/debates so that students have the opportunity to engage the material in a variety of ways. 3 hrs. lect.

GEOG0218A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0218A-S14

CRN: 22076

Cultural Geography

Cultural Geography
What do landscapes mean? How are places created and invested with significance? Why do people struggle to control public and private space? In this course we will examine these and similar questions. The main goals are to illuminate the wealth of meanings embodied in the built environment and our metaphorical understandings of landscape, place, space, and geographical identity, and to teach skills for interpreting and representing those meanings. Lectures, course readings, small-group projects, and papers will draw on social theory and empirical approaches, with a regional emphasis on North America. 3 hrs. lect.

GEOG0230A-S14

CRN: 21876

Geography of South Asia: Youth

Geography of South Asia: Youth
In this course we will explore the idea of regions through the representations and history of the area of the world referred to as South Asia, viewed through the lens of Geographies of Youth. Geographies of Youth is the study of how social and economic transformations, operating from the global scale to everyday local activities, are altering young people’s lives. We will use key concepts from geography, such as scale, space, place, identity, and context to explore everyday experiences of young people in Pakistan, India, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Focusing on the themes of politics, education, and work, we will consider connections among young people in these places and students at Middlebury. 3 hrs. lect.

GEOG0255A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0255A-S14

CRN: 22095

Surface & Ground Water
Please register via GEOL 0255A

Surface and Ground Water
Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0255Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0255Z-S14

CRN: 22096

Surface & Ground Water
Please register via GEOL 0255Z

Surface and Ground Water
Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0325A-S14

CRN: 22092

Cartographic Design

Cartographic Design
In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, wayfinding, thematic map design, realism, 3D rendering, and interactive maps. Laboratory exercises will provide opportunities for students to use graphics software and geographic information systems to implement concepts from lectures. Through a series of independent projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate spatial information to specialist and lay audiences. (GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0320 or by waiver; open to geography majors) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SOC (J. Howarth)

GEOG0325Y-S14

CRN: 22093

Cartographic Design
Cartographic Design Lab

Cartographic Design
In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, wayfinding, thematic map design, realism, 3D rendering, and interactive maps. Laboratory exercises will provide opportunities for students to use graphics software and geographic information systems to implement concepts from lectures. Through a series of independent projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate spatial information to specialist and lay audiences. (GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0320 or by waiver; open to geography majors) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SOC (J. Howarth)

GEOG0325Z-S14

CRN: 22094

Cartographic Design
Cartographic Design Lab

Cartographic Design
In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, wayfinding, thematic map design, realism, 3D rendering, and interactive maps. Laboratory exercises will provide opportunities for students to use graphics software and geographic information systems to implement concepts from lectures. Through a series of independent projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate spatial information to specialist and lay audiences. (GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0320 or by waiver; open to geography majors) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SOC (J. Howarth)

GEOG0327A-S14

CRN: 22458

Archaeological Landscapes

Investigating Archaeological Landscapes using GIS & 3D Technologies
In this course we will explore human uses of and impacts on landscapes using geographic information systems (GIS) and 3D technologies. We will employ a range of methods to analyze how spatial and temporal patterns of material remains and environmental factors reflect and shape cultural practices. Through archaeological studies of the ancient Maya in Central America and the Nasca-Palpa region of Peru, we will explore a variety of factors that shape landscapes—past and present—including urban design, social networks, cosmology, population dynamics, and climate change. Cross-cutting the humanities and sciences, we will critically and creatively evaluate spatial and temporal categories and frameworks. (GEOG 0120 or by waiver) 3hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0327Z-S14

CRN: 22461

Archaeological Landscapes
Archaeological Landscapes Lab

Investigating Archaeological Landscapes using GIS & 3D Technologies
In this course we will explore human uses of and impacts on landscapes using geographic information systems (GIS) and 3D technologies. We will employ a range of methods to analyze how spatial and temporal patterns of material remains and environmental factors reflect and shape cultural practices. Through archaeological studies of the ancient Maya in Central America and the Nasca-Palpa region of Peru, we will explore a variety of factors that shape landscapes—past and present—including urban design, social networks, cosmology, population dynamics, and climate change. Cross-cutting the humanities and sciences, we will critically and creatively evaluate spatial and temporal categories and frameworks. (GEOG 0120 or by waiver) 3hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0328A-S14

CRN: 22463

GIS for the Developing World

GIS for the Developing World
In this course we will explore the opportunities and challenges of using geographic information systems (GIS) to study population and environmental change in least developed countries. Students will learn techniques to overcome the digital divide in countries with scarce data and low technological capacity, drawing on examples from Africa. In labs and independent projects, we will use open source software and data, learn how to control for data errors and quality, digitize and classify satellite images, analyze change over time, and practice participatory GIS. Throughout the course, we will critically reflect on how GIS affects our understanding and governance of society and the environment. (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0328Z-S14

CRN: 22464

GIS for the Developing World
GIS Developing World Lab

GIS for the Developing World
In this course we will explore the opportunities and challenges of using geographic information systems (GIS) to study population and environmental change in least developed countries. Students will learn techniques to overcome the digital divide in countries with scarce data and low technological capacity, drawing on examples from Africa. In labs and independent projects, we will use open source software and data, learn how to control for data errors and quality, digitize and classify satellite images, analyze change over time, and practice participatory GIS. Throughout the course, we will critically reflect on how GIS affects our understanding and governance of society and the environment. (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0352A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0352A-S14

CRN: 22097

Quaternary Geology
Please register via GEOL 0352A

Glacial and Quaternary Geology
The causes and effects of glaciation will be examined, along with the characteristics that make the Quaternary Period unique in geologic time. Topics will include glaciology, glacial erosion and deposition, glacier reconstruction, and techniques for interpreting and dating the Quaternary stratigraphic and paleoclimatic record from diverse terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine archives. Consideration also will be given to how severe climatic fluctuations impacted nonglacial environments. An overnight weekend field trip at the end of the semester will introduce students firsthand to alpine glacial landforms. (GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0170, and GEOL 0251, or consent of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0352Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0352Z-S14

CRN: 22098

Quaternary Geology
Please register via GEOL 0352Z

Glacial and Quaternary Geology
The causes and effects of glaciation will be examined, along with the characteristics that make the Quaternary Period unique in geologic time. Topics will include glaciology, glacial erosion and deposition, glacier reconstruction, and techniques for interpreting and dating the Quaternary stratigraphic and paleoclimatic record from diverse terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine archives. Consideration also will be given to how severe climatic fluctuations impacted nonglacial environments. An overnight weekend field trip at the end of the semester will introduce students firsthand to alpine glacial landforms. (GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0170, and GEOL 0251, or consent of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOG0404A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0404A-S14 SOAN0404A-S14

CRN: 22338

GeoLabor and Youth
Please register via IGST 0404A

Global Geographies of Labor and Youth
In this seminar we will examine the relationship between the spatial organization of the global political economy and the lives of working people and youth. We will investigate a variety of industrial and agrarian contexts in North America, Latin America, South Africa, India, and China. We will place an emphasis on the problems posed by labor and capital mobility, and global production networks that impact worker organization and the lives of children and young people. Students must have advanced reading ability in a language other than English as they will be required to work with foreign language sources. This course is equivalent to SOAN 0404 and IGST 0404. (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

GEOG0414A-S14

CRN: 22099

Seminar in Political Geography

Seminar in Political Geography: Radical Geographies
Geography has always been associated with the exercise of power and came into being as an academic discipline because it supported imperialism, nationalism, and war. However, the field of geography also has a lesser-known emancipatory tradition that emphasizes social justice, empowerment, and resistance to oppression. Early radical voices—anarchists, socialists, and pacifists—were silenced and often forced into exile. It was only in the context of the protest culture of the 1960s that radical geographies started to find an audience. In this seminar we will examine how geography and geographers have engaged in revolutionary activism, education for justice, social mobilization, and theorizations of alternative models of society. (Open to senior majors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

GEOL0104A-S14

CRN: 20358

Earthquakes and Volcanoes

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, despite being labeled as "natural disasters," are normal, natural geologic processes that have been occurring for billions of years on this planet. Unfortunately, these processes claim tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in property damage annually (on average). This course will focus on the fundamental causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the wide range of secondary effects (e.g., landslides, tsunami, etc.) that accompany these natural disasters. (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0104) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0104X-S14

CRN: 20365

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Discussion

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, despite being labeled as "natural disasters," are normal, natural geologic processes that have been occurring for billions of years on this planet. Unfortunately, these processes claim tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in property damage annually (on average). This course will focus on the fundamental causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the wide range of secondary effects (e.g., landslides, tsunami, etc.) that accompany these natural disasters. (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0104) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0104Y-S14

CRN: 20366

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Discussion

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, despite being labeled as "natural disasters," are normal, natural geologic processes that have been occurring for billions of years on this planet. Unfortunately, these processes claim tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in property damage annually (on average). This course will focus on the fundamental causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the wide range of secondary effects (e.g., landslides, tsunami, etc.) that accompany these natural disasters. (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0104) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0104Z-S14

CRN: 20367

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Discussion

Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, despite being labeled as "natural disasters," are normal, natural geologic processes that have been occurring for billions of years on this planet. Unfortunately, these processes claim tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in property damage annually (on average). This course will focus on the fundamental causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the wide range of secondary effects (e.g., landslides, tsunami, etc.) that accompany these natural disasters. (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0104) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0112A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0112B-S14

CRN: 20369

Environmental Geology

Environmental Geology
Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0112B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOL0112A-S14

CRN: 22480

Environmental Geology

Environmental Geology
Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0112Y-S14

CRN: 20371

Environmental Geology
Environmental Geology Lab

Environmental Geology
Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0112Z-S14

CRN: 20372

Environmental Geology
Environmental Geology Lab

Environmental Geology
Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0142A-S14

CRN: 22052

The Ocean Floor

The Ocean Floor
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0142X-S14

CRN: 22053

The Ocean Floor
Discussion

The Ocean Floor
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0142Y-S14

CRN: 22054

The Ocean Floor
Discussion

The Ocean Floor
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0142Z-S14

CRN: 22055

The Ocean Floor
Discussion

The Ocean Floor
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GEOL0211A-S14

CRN: 20417

Mineralogy

Mineralogy
This course covers the nature, identification, composition, and meaning of minerals and mineral assemblages. Introduction to crystallography, hand-specimen identification, optical mineralogy, x-ray analysis, and electron microbeam analysis. Laboratory: study of minerals in hand-specimen and under the polarizing microscope; use of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy in mineral analysis. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOL0211Z-S14

CRN: 20419

Mineralogy
Mineralogy Lab

Mineralogy
This course covers the nature, identification, composition, and meaning of minerals and mineral assemblages. Introduction to crystallography, hand-specimen identification, optical mineralogy, x-ray analysis, and electron microbeam analysis. Laboratory: study of minerals in hand-specimen and under the polarizing microscope; use of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy in mineral analysis. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOL0222A-S14

CRN: 21615

Remote Sensing in Geoscience

Remote Sensing in Geoscience
In this course we will discuss fundamentals of air- and space-based remote sensing applied to geological and environmental problems. The core goal is to understand how different wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation interact with Earth's surface, and how images collected in these different wavelengths can be used to address questions in the Earth sciences. Lectures will present theory and basics of data collection as well as applications in hydrology, vegetation analysis, glaciology, tectonics, meteorology, oceanography, planetary exploration, and resource exploration. Labs will focus on commonly-used imagery and software to learn techniques for digital image processing, analysis and interpretation in Earth science. (A geology course or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab

GEOL0255A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0255A-S14

CRN: 22057

Surface & Ground Water

Surface and Ground Water
Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOL0255Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0255Z-S14

CRN: 22058

Surface & Ground Water
Surface & Ground Water Lab

Surface and Ground Water
Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOL0352A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0352A-S14

CRN: 22059

Quaternary Geology

Glacial and Quaternary Geology
This course will provide an overview of the tools used in determining depositional environments and tectonic settings of sedimentary rocks. Lectures will cover depositional systems and facies relationships, stratigraphic principles, origin of sedimentary structures and textures. Labs and field trips will include methods in sedimentary basin analysis, and sedimentary petrology. (formerly GEOL 0321) (Any 0100-level geology course, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0352Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0352Z-S14

CRN: 22060

Quaternary Geology
Quaternary Geology Lab

Glacial and Quaternary Geology
This course will provide an overview of the tools used in determining depositional environments and tectonic settings of sedimentary rocks. Lectures will cover depositional systems and facies relationships, stratigraphic principles, origin of sedimentary structures and textures. Labs and field trips will include methods in sedimentary basin analysis, and sedimentary petrology. (formerly GEOL 0321) (Any 0100-level geology course, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL0382A-S14

CRN: 22061

Geophysics

Geophysics
An introduction to the physical nature of the Earth from two perspectives: 1) Whole-Earth Geophysics: the large-scale properties of the planet, including formation, structure, gravity, orbital properties, and seismology, and 2) Geophysical Exploration: acquisition and interpretation of geophysical data derived from surface and satellite-based observation. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GEOL0382Z-S14

CRN: 22062

Geophysics
Geophysics Lab

Geophysics
An introduction to the physical nature of the Earth from two perspectives: 1) Whole-Earth Geophysics: the large-scale properties of the planet, including formation, structure, gravity, orbital properties, and seismology, and 2) Geophysical Exploration: acquisition and interpretation of geophysical data derived from surface and satellite-based observation. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

GRMN0333A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0333A-S14

CRN: 22447

Dealing with the Devil(in Eng)
Please register via CMLT 0333A

Dealing with the Devil: The "Faust" Tradition (in English)
Would you sell your soul to the devil if you could receive whatever you wanted in return? Faust made that deal for ultimate knowledge. Did he achieve his goal? Can the devil be trusted? Who wins in such a scenario: Faust or the devil? The search for knowledge and its inherent pitfalls have occupied cultures for centuries. The "Faust" Stoff emanates from a literary tradition that revolves around this search and connects it with the inexplicable forces of the supernatural. We can find "Faust" in music, literature, and the visual arts not only all over Europe, but also in the United States. This course focuses on a discussion of "Faust" in music and literature, primarily in the works of Marlowe, Goethe, Gounod, Liszt, Mann, Bulgakov, and Kerouac. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0264A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0264A-S14

CRN: 22243

Indian Cinema Romance
Please register via FMMC 0264A

Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0330A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0330A-S14

CRN: 22353

Psychology of Gender
Please register via PSYC 0330A

Psychology of Gender *
In this course we will consider biological and psychosocial contributors to similarities and differences between male and female behavior and the brain, focusing on approaches grounded in psychological science. Topics will include aggression, cognition, gender roles, gender identity, sexual orientation, and psychological disorders, as well as issues of the workplace and parenting. Course readings and content will strongly emphasize empirical scientific articles in order to address methodological challenges and controversies. (PSYC 0105; open to psychology, neuroscience and GSFS majors; NSCI seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0388A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0388A-S14

CRN: 22517

Gender/Violence-Hispanic World
Please register via SPAN 0388A

Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HARC0230A-S14

CRN: 21354

Modern Architecture

Modern Architecture
Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. Lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0314A-S14

CRN: 22334

Children of Russian Revolution

Born Under a Red Star: Children of Russia’s Revolution at Home, at School, and at Play
To understand a particular society, consider how it regards its children. In the USSR, children represented more than future guardians of culture and tradition, they were the lifeblood of the revolution. The state's existence depended on how well it imbued its youth with the spirit of socialism. Soviet children were politically privileged, but also constant victims of poverty and political turmoil. In this seminar we will study their experiences at school, at home, and at play. Using schoolbooks, fairytales, diaries, drawings, and the material culture of sports, toys, and fashion, we will explore childhood (Soviet and otherwise) as a historically constructed phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem.

IGST0250A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0250A-S14

CRN: 22033

Intl Diplomacy & Mod. S. Asia

International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

IGST0404A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0404A-S14 SOAN0404A-S14

CRN: 22337

GeoLabor and Youth

Global Geographies of Labor and Youth
In this seminar we will examine the relationship between the spatial organization of the global political economy and the lives of working people and youth. We will investigate a variety of industrial and agrarian contexts in North America, Latin America, South Africa, India, and China. We will place an emphasis on the problems posed by labor and capital mobility, and global production networks that impact worker organization and the lives of children and young people. Students must have advanced reading ability in a language other than English as they will be required to work with foreign language sources. This course is equivalent to SOAN 0404 and GEOG 0404. (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

JAPN0103A-S14

CRN: 20515

First-Year Japanese

First-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0103B-S14

CRN: 20661

First-Year Japanese

First-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

JAPN0202A-S14

CRN: 20518

Second-Year Japanese

Second-Year Japanese
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0201. (JAPN 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

MATH0200C-S14

CRN: 20099

Linear Algebra

Linear Algebra
Matrices and systems of linear equations, the Euclidean space of three dimensions and other real vector spaces, independence and dimensions, scalar products and orthogonality, linear transformations and matrix representations, eigenvalues and similarity, determinants, the inverse of a matrix and Cramer's rule. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

NSCI0301A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301A-S14

CRN: 21126

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301A

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0301B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301B-S14

CRN: 22421

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301B

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0301W-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301W-S14

CRN: 21127

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301W

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0301X-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301X-S14

CRN: 22422

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301X

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0301Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301Y-S14

CRN: 22423

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301Y

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0301Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0301Z-S14

CRN: 21128

Physiological Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0301Z

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

NSCI0305A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0305A-S14

CRN: 21122

Cognitive Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0305A

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

NSCI0305Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0305Y-S14

CRN: 21123

Cognitive Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0305Y

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

NSCI0305Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0305Z-S14

CRN: 21124

Cognitive Psychology
Please register via PSYC 0305Z

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

NSCI0433A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0433A-S14

CRN: 22104

Neurobiology Memory Cognition
Please register via PSYC 0433A

Neurobiology of Memory and Cognition
In this course we will explore the neurobiological mechanisms that allow animals, humans included, to store, process and recall information used to guide behavior. We will discuss topics that include cellular and chemical mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, network theories of brain function, cognitive enhancement, and the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. Through reading and discussion of review articles and the primary scientific literature, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology translate into behavior and complex cognitive abilities. (PSYC 0301 or by waiver; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

NSCI0475A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
BIOL0475A-S14

CRN: 22074

Neuroplasticity
Please register via BIOL 0475A

Neuroplasticity
In order for the brain to encode, process, and retain new information, it must constantly change. Neuroplasticity refers to this capacity of the central nervous system to modify its organization in response to endogenous or environmental stimuli. In this course we will discuss the molecular and cellular basis of multiple forms of neuroplasticity within the adult brain (e.g., LTP, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis) and examine how neuroplasticity contributes to learning and memory, neural regeneration following injury, and various neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and depression). (BIOL 0216 or BIOL 0370 or PSYC 301) 3hrs sem.

PHYS0106A-S14

CRN: 22350

Physics for Educated Citizens

Physics for Educated Citizens
In this course for nonscience majors we will explore topics of current interest—climate change, energy resources, nuclear processes, radiation, satellite communication—and show how each is understood within the context of physics. Our resources will be a textbook, Physics and Technology for Future Presidents, and non-technical articles of your choosing. Our goals will be to develop a working knowledge of physics as it applies to important topics, to effectively communicate that knowledge through discussions and oral presentations, and to develop an understanding of how science is grounded in data and thoroughly intertwined with society. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1381). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHYS0109A-S14

CRN: 20004

Newtonian Physics

Newtonian Physics
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0109W-S14

CRN: 21970

Newtonian Physics
Newtonian Physics Lab

Newtonian Physics
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0109X-S14

CRN: 20007

Newtonian Physics
Newtonian Physics Lab

Newtonian Physics
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0109Y-S14

CRN: 20008

Newtonian Physics
Newtonian Physics Lab

Newtonian Physics
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0109Z-S14

CRN: 20009

Newtonian Physics
Newtonian Physics Lab

Newtonian Physics
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0110A-S14

CRN: 20386

Electricity & Magnetism

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0110W-S14

CRN: 21110

Electricity & Magnetism
Electricity & Magnetism Lab

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0110X-S14

CRN: 20389

Electricity & Magnetism
Electricity & Magnetism Lab

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0110Y-S14

CRN: 20390

Electricity & Magnetism
Electricity & Magnetism Lab

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0110Z-S14

CRN: 20714

Electricity & Magnetism
Electricity & Magnetism Lab

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PHYS0202A-S14

CRN: 20379

Quantum Physics Applications

Quantum Physics and Applications
This course introduces quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and explores the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the Schrödinger wave equation, and wave mechanics. These techniques are then applied to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle systems. (PHYS 0201; PHYS 0212 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect.

PHYS0212A-S14

CRN: 20375

Applied Math For Phys. Science

Applied Mathematics for the Physical Sciences
This course concentrates on the methods of applied mathematics used for treating the partial differential equations that commonly arise in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Topics include differential vector calculus, Fourier series, and other orthogonal function sets. Emphasis will be given to physical applications of the mathematics. Both analytic and numerical methods are employed. This course is a prerequisite for all 0300- and 0400-level physics courses. (MATH 0122; PHYS 0110 concurrent or prior) 4.5 hrs. lect.

PHYS0370A-S14

CRN: 22474

Cosmology

Cosmology
Cosmology is the study of the Universe as a whole entity, including the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the entire Universe. In this course we will study the Big Bang, inflation, primordial nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background, the formation of galaxies, and large-scale structure. The course will link observations to theory in order to address some of the current open questions in cosmology such as: what are the forms of matter and energy distributed in the Universe? What is the expansion rate of the Universe and how has it changed with time? What is the age of the Universe? What is the shape of the Universe? (PHYS 0201, PHYS 0202, and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect.

PHYS0401A-S14

CRN: 21663

Quantum Mechanics

Quantum Mechanics
A fundamental course in quantum mechanics aimed at understanding the mathematical structure of the theory and its application to physical phenomena at the atomic and nuclear levels. Topics include the basic postulates of quantum mechanics, operator formalism, Schrödinger equation, one-dimensional and central potentials, angular momentum and spin, perturbation theory, and systems of identical particles. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect.

PHYS0704A-S14

CRN: 21393

Senior Project

Senior Project
Independent research project culminating in both written and oral presentations.

PSCI0250A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0250A-S14

CRN: 22032

Intl Diplomacy and Mod. S Asia
Please register via IGST 0250A

International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to IGST 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0260A-S14

CRN: 21366

Pol Economy Drug Trafficking

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0429A-S14

CRN: 22203

Seminar on US Congress

Seminar on the U.S. Congress
The U.S. Congress is the most powerful political institution in the nation, and one of the least popular. To understand why, this course examines theories of representation and how they relate to the contemporary Congress; the historical development and institutionalization of the Congress; the roles of parties, candidates, media, and money in Congressional elections; the legislative process, including roles of committees, interest groups, parties, congressional leaders, and presidents; the impact of representational and policy-making processes on the nature of legislation enacted by Congress; and Congress in comparative perspective. (Open to junior and senior majors) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSYC0105A-S14

CRN: 20038

Introduction To Psychology
Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105B-S14

CRN: 20039

Introduction To Psychology
Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105C-S14

CRN: 21385

Introduction To Psychology

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105D-S14

CRN: 22546

Introduction To Psychology
Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105Q-S14

CRN: 22547

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105D

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105R-S14

CRN: 22548

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105D

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105S-S14

CRN: 21671

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105C

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105T-S14

CRN: 21386

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105C

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105U-S14

CRN: 20625

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105C

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105V-S14

CRN: 20626

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105B

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105W-S14

CRN: 20627

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105B

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105X-S14

CRN: 20628

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105A

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105Y-S14

CRN: 20623

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105A

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0105Z-S14

CRN: 20624

Introduction To Psychology
Discussion - PSYC 0105A

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

PSYC0201A-S14

CRN: 20055

Psychological Statistics

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical tests analysis. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0201B-S14

CRN: 20988

Psychological Statistics

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical tests analysis. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0201Y-S14

CRN: 20987

Psychological Statistics
Psychological Stats Lab B

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical tests analysis. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0201Z-S14

CRN: 20058

Psychological Statistics
Psychological Stats Lab A

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical tests analysis. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0202A-S14

CRN: 20001

Research Methods in Psychology

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0202B-S14

CRN: 21272

Research Methods in Psychology

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0202Y-S14

CRN: 21274

Research Methods in Psychology
Research Methods Lab B

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0202Z-S14

CRN: 20002

Research Methods in Psychology
Research Methods Lab A

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

PSYC0203A-S14

CRN: 21275

Social Psychology

Social Psychology
Social psychology is the study of how social situations affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals. This course will provide an overview of social psychological theory and research findings, as well as reviewing the ways in which these findings are applied to the study of issues such as aggression, close relationships, prejudice, and altruism. Students will also learn about the research methods that social psychologists use to test their theories. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

PSYC0225A-S14

CRN: 20151

Child Development

Child Development
In this course, we will examine the nature of developmental change from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Our critical examination of developmental processes will invite us to consider various theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, cognitive, biological, contextual) across various domains of development (i.e., physical, social-emotional, and cognitive). We will address major themes in developmental psychology, such as the interrelatedness of development across domains, the contributions of nature and nurture, and the relative continuity versus discontinuity of developmental change. Throughout, we will practice applying developmental principles to practical settings, policy issues, and topics of current interest. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

PSYC0301A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301A-S14

CRN: 20642

Physiological Psychology

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0301B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301B-S14

CRN: 22206

Physiological Psychology

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0301W-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301W-S14

CRN: 22208

Physiological Psychology
Physiological Psychology Lab B

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0301X-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301X-S14

CRN: 22209

Physiological Psychology
Physiological Psychology Lab B

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0301Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301Y-S14

CRN: 20643

Physiological Psychology
Physiological Psychology Lab A

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0301Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0301Z-S14

CRN: 20644

Physiological Psychology
Physiological Psychology Lab A

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

PSYC0305A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0305A-S14

CRN: 20989

Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

PSYC0305Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0305Y-S14

CRN: 20990

Cognitive Psychology
Cognitive Psychology Lab

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

PSYC0305Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0305Z-S14

CRN: 20991

Cognitive Psychology
Cognitive Psychology Lab

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

PSYC0327A-S14

CRN: 20329

Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a psychological understanding of teaching and learning through an overview of principles, issues, and related research in educational psychology. The course will examine theories of learning, complex cognitive processes, cognitive and emotional development, motivation, and the application of these constructs to effective instruction, the design of optimum learning environments, assessment of student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225, ; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors, and to education studies minors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

PSYC0330A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0330A-S14

CRN: 22352

Psychology of Gender

Psychology of Gender
In this course we will consider biological and psychosocial contributors to similarities and differences between male and female behavior and the brain, focusing on approaches grounded in psychological science. Topics will include aggression, cognition, gender roles, gender identity, sexual orientation, and psychological disorders, as well as issues of the workplace and parenting. Course readings and content will strongly emphasize empirical scientific articles in order to address methodological challenges and controversies. (PSYC 0105; open to psychology and GSFS majors; NSCI majors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

PSYC0403A-S14

CRN: 21387

Human Motivation

Human Motivation
Why do we throw ourselves into some projects enthusiastically, while only a hefty bribe could induce us to work on others? In this seminar, we will explore the vicissitudes of human motivation across multiple perspectives (e.g., drive, learning, social-cognitive theories), domains of human activity (e.g., academics, athletics), and developmental periods. Through our own observational studies and critical reading of theory and research, we will challenge popular notions of what motivates, examine individual differences in motivation, and complicate our everyday intuitions of how motivation is experienced and measured. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

PSYC0405A-S14

CRN: 22207

Psych Racial/Ethnic Minorities

The Psychology of Racial/Ethnic Minorities
This course will explore areas within the field of psychology that relate to the experiences of racial and ethnic groups currently living in the United States. The course is designed to examine psychological perspectives to provide a comprehensive understanding of the issues and problems confronted by members of various racial/ethnic minority groups today. We will examine issues related to stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, identity, self-concept, cognitive development, acculturation, assessment, mental health, and public policy as they pertain to U.S. minorities. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors, or by waiver only) 3 hrs. sem.

PSYC0433A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
NSCI0433A-S14

CRN: 22105

Neurobiology Memory Cognition

Neurobiology of Memory and Cognition
In this course we will explore the neurobiological mechanisms that allow animals, humans included, to store, process and recall information used to guide behavior. We will discuss topics that include cellular and chemical mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, network theories of brain function, cognitive enhancement, and the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. Through reading and discussion of review articles and the primary scientific literature, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology translate into behavior and complex cognitive abilities. (PSYC 0301 or by waiver; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

SOAN0267Y-S14

CRN: 22467

Global Health
Discussion

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0267Z-S14

CRN: 22468

Global Health
Discussion

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0371A-S14

CRN: 22528

Sociology of Culture

Sociology of Culture
In this course we will investigate basic ideas about culture, power, and identity, and investigate how they are used to understand the cultural distinctiveness of modernity. We will then explore how sociology has analyzed tensions among art, science, technology and social interaction in the modern world, and explored distinctions among "high," "popular," and "mass" culture. Particular attention will be paid to the rise of the media, "the culture industry," and the formation of subcultures. The course links these topics together in a concluding discussion of cultural modernism, postmodernism, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SOAN0404A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0404A-S14 GEOG0404A-S14

CRN: 22339

GeoLabor and Youth
Please register via IGST 0404A

Global Geographies of Labor and Youth
In this seminar we will examine the relationship between the spatial organization of the global political economy and the lives of working people and youth. We will investigate a variety of industrial and agrarian contexts in North America, Latin America, South Africa, India, and China. We will place an emphasis on the problems posed by labor and capital mobility, and global production networks that impact worker organization and the lives of children and young people. Students must have advanced reading ability in a language other than English as they will be required to work with foreign language sources. This course is equivalent to IGST 0404 and GEOG 0404. (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

SPAN0388A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0388A-S14

CRN: 22484

Gender/Violence-Hispanic World

Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

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