Middlebury

Robert A. Jones '59 House
148 Hillcrest Rd.
Middlebury, VT
United States

The Rohatyn Center for International Affairs (RCFIA), housed in the Robert A. Jones '59 house, is an international resource and research center that supports the College's goal of advancing global understanding that radiates from a core linguistic and cultural competency. The House also holds the offices of several professors as well as the office of the Chair of the International Politics and Economics Major. The Seminar Room, located on the second floor of the building, has seen some outstanding seminars, lectures, and round table discussions by both known political and global personalities as well as Middlebury's own students in the annual International Studies Colloquium.

History

Formerly Geonomics House, in 2001 this structure was dedicated in honor of Robert A. Jones '59.

Printing

RAJ Lab

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Departments

Courses

ENAM0204A-S14

CRN: 20021

Foundations of English Lit.

Foundations of English Literature (I)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./dsc.

IGST0434A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0434A-S14

CRN: 22340

War and Consequences

War: Causes, Conduct, Consequences
Why do human beings organize themselves in armed groups to attack and kill other human beings? What is it like to experience war, both as a combatant and a non-combatant caught in its vortex? How has warfare evolved over time? Which legal or moral considerations affect how wars are fought? What are the mechanisms of war propaganda? What are the immediate and long-term consequences of war? What is the future of war? These are some of the questions we will try to answer. Readings include works by psychologists, political scientists, historians, philosophers, poets, fiction writers, dramatists, film-makers, and participants. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0434.

ITAL0103A-S14

CRN: 21300

Intensive Beginning Italian

Intensive Beginning Italian III
This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen.

ITAL0123A-S14

CRN: 21267

Accelerated Beginning Italian

Accelerated Beginning Italian
This course is an intensive introduction to the Italian language that condenses the material normally covered in ITAL 0101 and 0102. We will focus on the spoken language and encourage rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary. Conversation and drill will be stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian culture, film, and music. We will meet 5 times a week including two 75-minutes meetings and an additional drill session. After completing this course students will be fully prepared for second-year Italian. 6 hr lect./disc./1.5 hr drill

PSCI0103A-S14

CRN: 20013

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0321A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321B-S14

CRN: 22351

Anglo vs. Franco Africa

Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0321B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321A-S14

CRN: 22453

Anglo vs. Franco Africa

Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0413A-S14

CRN: 22202

Mass Media&Democratization

Media and Democratization
The news media can either support or undermine non-democratic regimes. This tension between media liberalization and political control is well-captured in Yuezhi Zhao’s book Communication in China: Political Economy, Power and Conflict, which will serve as a thematic anchor for this course. We will examine the impact of print, television, and new media on democratization in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Africa, while drawing from the literature on democratic transitions and the communications literature on media effects. The goal of the course is to understand the causes of press freedom, its role in the erosion of state control, and its implications for the survival of authoritarian regimes. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0434A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0434A-S14

CRN: 22341

War and Consequences
Please register via IGST 0434A

War: Causes, Conduct, Consequences
Why do human beings organize themselves in armed groups to attack and kill other human beings? What is it like to experience war, both as a combatant and a non-combatant caught in its vortex? How has warfare evolved over time? Which legal or moral considerations affect how wars are fought? What are the mechanisms of war propaganda? What are the immediate and long-term consequences of war? What is the future of war? These are some of the questions we will try to answer. Readings include works by psychologists, political scientists, historians, philosophers, poets, fiction writers, dramatists, film-makers, and participants. This course is equivalent to IGST 0434. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

RELI0121Y-S14

CRN: 22494

Buddhist Traditions in India
Discussion

Buddhist Traditions in India AT
An introduction to the development of Indian Buddhist thought, practice, and institutions. The course will begin with an examination of the life of the Buddha and the formation of the early tradition. It will then explore developments from early Nikaya Buddhism, through the rise of the Mahayana, and culminating in Tantric Buddhism. Attention will be given throughout to parallel evolutions of doctrine, practice, and the path to Nirvana. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RELI0121Z-S14

CRN: 22495

Buddhist Traditions in India
Discussion

Buddhist Traditions in India AT
An introduction to the development of Indian Buddhist thought, practice, and institutions. The course will begin with an examination of the life of the Buddha and the formation of the early tradition. It will then explore developments from early Nikaya Buddhism, through the rise of the Mahayana, and culminating in Tantric Buddhism. Attention will be given throughout to parallel evolutions of doctrine, practice, and the path to Nirvana. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

RUSS0352A-S14

CRN: 22430

Tolstoy

Tolstoy (in English)
In this course we will focus on major works by literary giant Leo Tolstoy. Students will be introduced to his epic range, philosophical depth, and psychological acuteness. Readings encompass early short fiction including selected Sevastopol Tales, Three Deaths, and Family Happiness; in-depth analysis of his masterpiece Anna Karenina; and several late, post-conversion works including The Death of Ivan Ilych, The Kreutzer Sonata, and Master and Man. Excerpts from Tolstoy's memoirs, diaries, and letters. No knowledge of Russian required. 3 hrs. lect.

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