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AMST0101A-S12

CRN: 21614

Intro to American Studies

Introduction to American Studies: The Imagination of Disaster
In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, music, biography, and architecture. This year, we will focus on the meaning and narration of disaster in American culture, stretching from Puritan fears of God's wrath to contemporary responses to 9/11 and the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Specific texts will include Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale; Susan Sontag, The Imagination of Disaster; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; and films such as Irwin Allen's The Towering Inferno and Roland Emmerich's The Day After Tomorrow. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0104A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104A-S12

CRN: 22255

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104A

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. (Formerly FMMC 0236) 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen./1 hr. disc.

AMST0104B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104B-S12

CRN: 22353

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104B

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. (Formerly FMMC 0236) 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen./1 hr. disc.

AMST0104Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104Z-S12

CRN: 22366

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104Z

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. (Formerly FMMC 0236) 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen./1 hr. disc.

AMST0206A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0206A-S12

CRN: 21136

19th Century American Lit.
Please register via ENAM 0206A

Nineteenth-Century American Literature
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0206B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0206B-S12

CRN: 22324

19th Century American Lit.
Please register via ENAM 0206B

Nineteenth-Century American Literature
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0211A-S12

CRN: 20457

Mod. American Cult. 1920-2001

Formation of Modern American Culture II: 1920-2001
A continuation of the themes addressed in AMST 0210, tracing the development of a distinctive national and international American culture between 1920 and 2001. The class will highlight the rise of modern mass culture, focusing on the emergence of new cultural forms and media, the increasingly public role played by women and racial minorities, the changing nature of the built environment, and the importance of American popular culture on the world stage. Less a survey of cultural history than an interdisciplinary examination of key issues and conflicts, the course will be organized around a variety of written, visual, and aural texts. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0211B-S12

CRN: 22286

Mod. American Cult. 1920-2001

Formation of Modern American Culture II: 1920-2001
A continuation of the themes addressed in AMST 0210, tracing the development of a distinctive national and international American culture between 1920 and 2001. The class will highlight the rise of modern mass culture, focusing on the emergence of new cultural forms and media, the increasingly public role played by women and racial minorities, the changing nature of the built environment, and the importance of American popular culture on the world stage. Less a survey of cultural history than an interdisciplinary examination of key issues and conflicts, the course will be organized around a variety of written, visual, and aural texts. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0215A-S12

CRN: 22267

Football and Higher Education

Football and Higher Education
Football originated on American campuses, and its 150-year history reflects the vibrant, uneasy relation between sports and higher education. The first "big time" college sport, football became a media spectacle in the 1890s, and since then critics have debated the game's violence, educational merits, commercial trappings, and bearing on college admissions policies. The course will move from the 19th century to the present, tracing the sport's cultural meanings, its relation to class identity and gender roles, and its educational mission, including the sport's regulation by the NCAA. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to these issues, and readings will include literary and secondary works by William Bowen, Robert Lipsyte, Michael Oriard, and Murray Sperber.

AMST0216A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0216A-S12

CRN: 22027

Hist of American West
Please register via HIST 0216A

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374)

AMST0245A-S12

CRN: 21379

American Landscape: 1825-1865

American Landscape: 1825-1865
This course will explore American landscape painting through an interdisciplinary approach, employing art, literature, religion, and history. In studying the landscape paintings of Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, and Frederic Church, we will also consider the commercial growth of New York City; the myths and legends of the Catskill Mountains; the writings of James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Henry David Thoreau; the opening of the Erie Canal; and the design and construction of Central Park. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0253A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0253A-S12

CRN: 22214

Science Fiction

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0254A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0254A-S12

CRN: 21626

Millennial Media
Please register via FMMC 0254A

Millennial Media: Youth Audiences and Commercial Culture
Coming of age narratives speak to both youth audiences and adult viewers, and thus have a pervasive impact on popular culture. In this course, we will explore the commercial construct of the "millennial generation," a generation imagined to span those born from the late 1970s through 2000. We will consider how representations of adolescents circulate in American film, television, and digital media texts such as Harry Potter and Glee, examining their industrial contexts and their audience response. We will interrogate trade and popular publications seeking to define millennials, and consider the social significance of generational discourse more broadly. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0270A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0270A-S12

CRN: 22395

Thoreau/Lib Relig/Soc Change
Please register via RELI 0270A

Thoreau, Liberal Religion and Social Change AR, WT
Thoreau is best known as a “nature writer,” but his contribution to American religion and culture is much broader. In this course, we will examine Thoreau’s work within the broader context of his deepest concerns, including challenges to Christian orthodoxies, the early study of “world religions,” abolitionism, non-violence, and the critique of capitalism. We will focus on Thoreau’s life and thought including Walden and beyond, reading widely among thinkers who most influenced him. In the second half of the seminar, we will explore Thoreau’s many modern legacies: liberal religion, religious pluralism, non-violent resistance, anti-consumption, environmentalism, and civil rights campaigns. 3 hrs. sem.

AMST0276A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0276A-S12

CRN: 22234

Religion in the Borderlands

Religion in the Borderlands
In this course we will survey the religious and cultural history of the U.S./Mexico borderlands. Themes and issues to be covered include: the definition of place, the history of religious iconography, ritual performance and community, transformations in forms of belief, and the effects of linguistic pluralism on cultural and religious creativity. Readings will include: Gloria Anzaldua's Borderlands/La Frontera, Alberto Pulido's The Sacred World of the Penitentes, and other historical and literary works. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0408A-S12

CRN: 22287

Am Art In Context:
Art & Life of Winslow Homer

American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer
Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0417A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0417A-S12

CRN: 22347

Modern Am Indian Social Hist
Please Register via HIST 0417A

Modern American Indian Social History
Popular narratives of American Indian history often conclude with the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre and fail to acknowledge the endurance and resurgence of modern Indian nations. In this readings seminar, we will examine Native life and the processes of accommodation, resistance, renewal, and change from the reservation era to the present. Course topics will include: treaty rights and tribal sovereignty, federal Indian policy, pan-Indian movements, reservation governance and economic development, cultural revitalization, conflict over natural resources, identity politics, and urban experiences. We will also reflect upon the various interdisciplinary sources and interdisciplinary methods of American Indian studies. 3 hrs. sem.

AMST0420A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0420A-S12 HARC0420A-S12

CRN: 22191

Visual Culture of the Americas
Please register via INTL 0420A

Visual Cultures of the Americas
From murals to monuments and telenovelas to veladoras, this bilingual [Spanish/English] seminar will explore the role of visual expression in the history of cultural formation throughout the Americas. We will take a hemispheric and transnational approach to our studies. As such, two related premises inform the material we will examine: images traverse the boundaries of nation-states, and they are intrinsically tied to the developments of modern history. We will combine theoretical works with a variety of still and moving images (artifacts of mass culture, photography, artwork, film, mixed media, and performance) to study the relationship between "visuality" and flows of culture throughout Latin and Anglo Americas. This course is equivalent to INTL 0420 and HARC 0420. 3 hr. sem.

AMST0500A-S12

CRN: 20039

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500B-S12

CRN: 20042

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500C-S12

CRN: 21926

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500D-S12

CRN: 20049

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500E-S12

CRN: 20050

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500F-S12

CRN: 20051

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500G-S12

CRN: 20052

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500I-S12

CRN: 20054

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500K-S12

CRN: 21191

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500L-S12

CRN: 21443

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500M-S12

CRN: 21444

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0700B-S12

CRN: 21412

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0700C-S12

CRN: 21418

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0700D-S12

CRN: 21927

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0700E-S12

CRN: 21928

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0700F-S12

CRN: 21735

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0700G-S12

CRN: 21736

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

AMST0704A-S12

CRN: 21130

Senior Seminar:
Black Aesthetics

Senior Seminar: Black Aesthetics
In this course we will consider aesthetic manifestos generated throughout the 20th century by African-American artists and critics. Each statement reflects its authors’ struggle to balance concerns about individual and collective creative practice and identity politics. We will situate each document in its cultural historical context and consider artwork from various media—literature, visual art, music, and film—made in response to each manifesto. Topics include the benefits and challenges inherent in race-based aesthetics; the geographies of each artistic movement; questions of class and gender that shape the statements; and the position of each manifesto in a global context. (Open to American Studies majors; others may register with instructor’s approval)

AMST0710A-S12

CRN: 20045

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710B-S12

CRN: 20056

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710C-S12

CRN: 21929

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710D-S12

CRN: 20057

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710E-S12

CRN: 20059

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710F-S12

CRN: 20060

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710G-S12

CRN: 20061

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710I-S12

CRN: 20064

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710L-S12

CRN: 21445

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710M-S12

CRN: 21446

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0400, are eligible for honors and choose to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)