Winter Term 2018

 

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WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
   Classics
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Interdepartmental 
        Linguistics
    Neuroscience
    Writing Program
    Student-Led Course

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German
    Greek
    Latin
   Hebrew
   Spanish & Portuguese
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Economics
  Education Studies
  Geography
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology/Anthropology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
  

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Physics

 

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


American Studies

AMST/WRPR 0203 Media, Sports, & Identity     
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of individual identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Students will describe, define, explain, and discuss the general challenges to identity formation when confronted by major ideals communicated through mediated sports. Students will further identify and evaluate some of the cultural assumptions in writing about sports. CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)

AMST 1017 Material Culture in Focus
In this course we will investigate material culture, objects made or altered by human hands and design. We will keep a tight focus on one object or group of objects, cultivating an in-depth understanding and benefitting from access to local collections, curators, makers, and users. The focus will change annually, but the subject will always be an object of material culture that students will examine first-hand and research. Students will then create a lasting documentation and analysis of the work for public benefit, whether as an exhibition, a publication, or a website.

 For Winter 2018, we will focus on a “relic chair” of the Henry Sheldon Museum. Following the style of the classic Windsor chair and its democratic associations (Windsor chairs famously populate Independence Hall and were the seats of choice for those writing and debating the Constitution), Henry Sheldon crafted this particular chair using at least twenty-five different kinds of wood; each spindle comes from a famous landmark, ship, site, or artifact. Students will investigate the history of the form, the practice of chair-making, Colonial Revivals, the significance of the tradition of the “relic,” and its subsequent influence. We will have first-hand experience with wood-working and exhibition-building, creating our own Middlebury “relic chair” as well as a website that will share our research, findings, and analysis with a broader public. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)

 AMST 1018 "Domestic Dependent Nations": The Puzzle of Native Sovereignty in America
In 1831, John Marshall deemed Native American tribes “domestic dependent nations.” This moniker still serves as the Supreme Court’s ambiguous answer to the question of where Native tribes belong in America. In this course we will consider the sovereignty of “domestic dependent nations” in relation to U.S. sovereignty. Key texts will include Kevin Bruyneel’s The Third Space of Sovereignty and Vine Deloria’s Custer Died for Your Sins. We will situate histories of Native resistance, resilience, and persistence alongside histories of American expansion to understand the logics that undergird the displacement of Native peoples and the development of federal Indian policy. NOR, AMR, HIS (This course counts as an elective for the American Studies major) (T. Taylor, visiting winter term instructor)

Tyler Taylor is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in American Studies at The College of William and Mary and a Middlebury alumna from the class of 2012. She specializes in American Indian Studies, and is currently writing her dissertation on the interrelated histories of American and Italian colonialisms.

AMST 1019 American Comedy: Cultural and Ethnic Perspectives
In this course we will focus on how American comedy has shaped, and been shaped by, particular cultural and ethnic sensibilities. Beginning with the 1960s, we will analyze the developments and transformations in comic personae, techniques, and what can serve as comedic material. Students will have the opportunity to discuss comedy as a genre of entertainment and mode of discourse. Some of the guiding questions include: how has American comedy enabled or disrupted a sense of shared cultural sensibilities in particular historical moments? In what ways does ethnic humor facilitate conversations about conflicts and controversies in ways that bring about new understanding and solidarities, or lay bare societal fissures? How does comedy imbue the person holding the mic with the power to grapple with, and even transgress, social and political norms? AMR, ART, CW, NOR, SOC (J. Finley)

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (S. Liebhaber, E. Saylor)

ARBC/ENVS 0245 Human-Environment Relations: Middle East
In this course we will begin with an environmental history of Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, asking such
questions as: How does politics affect conservation practice? To what extent are formulations of nature constructed socially and politically? Whose rights are affected by protected areas and who decides governance criteria? The
objectives of this course include providing students with an understanding of human-environment relations theory by addressing the regional specifics of modern environmental and social histories of these countries. We will look at
animals, water, and forests in the literature of NGOs, UNEP reports, media, policy papers, and the academic literature. (One of the following: ENVS 0112,GEOG 0100, IGST 0101, SOAN 0103; Or by approval) AAL, MDE, SOC (R.Greeley)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145; Open to BIOL majors or by waiver). DED (S. Sheldon, M. Lloyd, visiting winter term instructor)

BIOL 0392 Conservation Biology      
This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite course. (BIOL 0140) SCI (A. L'Roe a visiting winter term instructor)

BIOL 1006 Stem Cell Biology: Historical and Future Perspectives
The advent of advanced gene editing techniques has accelerated the potentials of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Students will be brought to the forefront of basic stem cell biology by studying its history, as well as its future possibilities. Through lectures, critical reading, writing, and informed discussions, we will use primary scientific literature to explore basic stem cell biology, cell differentiation, gene editing, and regenerative medicine. In addition to written summaries, students will complete a final paper based on a recent scientific paper in the field of stem cell biology. (BIOL 0145) (This course counts as an elective for the MBBC major)  SCI (J. Merkle, visiting winter term instructor)

Julie Merkle is an American Cancer Society-funded postdoctoral research fellow from the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. Her research focuses on cell fate specification during oogenesis.

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (W. Xu, D. Liu, J. Chen, B. Du visiting winter term instructor)

Comparative Literature

CMLT/ENAM 1027 England’s Ovid: Grabbing Back the Myth (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will read Ovid’s Latin compendium of foundational mythical stories, the Metamorphoses, in two important early modern English translations: 1) the 16th-century version by Arthur Golding (the very one that Shakespeare read), which Ezra Pound called “the most beautiful book in the English language”; and 2) the 17th-century version by George Sandys, which contains allegorical commentaries and elaborate synoptic engravings. We will discuss these myths with an emphasis on gender politics and oral storytelling, and sometimes discuss how they reemerge in English literature. We will also examine a rare first edition of the Sandys edition (1623) which is owned by Middlebury College’s Special Collections, in addition to a modern annotated edition. The material for the course contains literary and graphic depictions of sexual violence, which will be critiqued from an unapologetically feminist perspective.  EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

Computer Science

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

Dance

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can expect daily rehearsals plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval Required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (C. Brown)

DANC 1025 Radical Humanity: Performance and Social Activism
In this course we will cover the history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism; we will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will range from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art-making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class. ART, SOC (L. Winfield, visiting winter term instructor)

Lida Winfield’s work as an artist and educator is a manifestation of her activism, touching such topics as, disability, access, education, class, gender, loss, shame, joy, spirituality and coming of age all within the context of our fragile environment.  Lida has traveled nationally and internationally as a performer and educator working with diverse populations in conventional and unconventional settings. For more information: www.lidawinfield.com

Economics

ECON 0234 Economics of Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa is home to some of the poorest and some of the fastest growing economies in the world. In this course, we will explore the opportunities for sustained, inclusive economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, the challenges that must be overcome in realizing these opportunities, and the policy options for overcoming these challenges. Topics may include demography, institutions, infrastructure, agriculture, urbanization, climate change, health, natural resources, mobile technology, trade, and regional integration. Students will be exposed to relevant economic theory and recent empirical economic research on Africa. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155; or by approval) This course counts as elective credit towards the Economics major and IPEC major. AAL, SAF, SOC (O. Porteous)

ECON 1028 Economics of Welfare State
In this course we will study the evolution and characteristics of modern welfare states. Drawing on literature from economics, political science, and sociology, we will examine various forms of welfare states and explore big questions, such as: What are people owed by society? Do citizens owe something to society? Most developed capitalist societies have implemented various measures to protect their vulnerable citizens. We will study the tradeoff of efficiency and equity in providing welfare. We will also explore cross-country variations in the scope and impact of various welfare policies. Finally, we will consider the sustainability of the welfare state. This course counts as elective credit towards the Economics major and IPEC major. SOC (L. Timilsina, visiting winter term instructor)

I am a 2011 Middlebury graduate, currently doing a PhD in Economics at the Graduate Center, CUNY. I am interested in studying Development, Public Economies and Inequality.

Education Studies

EDST/LNGT 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003)  (J. McVeigh, visiting winter term instructor)

EDST/CRWR 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. (C. Cooper)

EDST 0227 JusTalks at Middlebury
In this course students will develop the ability to facilitate the JusTalks First-Year Forums that will take place during winter term and spring semester. The First Year Forums are intended to (i) foster the habits of listening empathically and responding constructively when engaging in complex discussions that address topics such as privilege and difference, and (ii) develop greater awareness of how to contribute actively to building an inclusive community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students will develop in this course are consciously intended to be transferable to other settings and transformative for the Middlebury community. (Approval Required) SOC (J. Miller-Lane, R. Trivedi, visiting winter term instructor)

EDST 0306 Elementary Science Methods
In this course we will investigate children’s scientific understanding and how to design learning experiences to advance their understanding. Students will learn to use a claim/evidence/reasoning framework to develop children’s scientific explanations.  We will also study recent research in science education and the engineering and design process.  Activities will include observing science instruction, conducting assessments, lesson planning, and teaching standards-based lessons. Students will gain an understanding of how to plan, implement, and assess science instruction through class and field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week).  Students will also collect evidence and write an entry for their Vermont licensure portfolio. (T. Weston)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 1007 Executive Function and Literacy
In this course students will gain an understanding of executive function and ADHD, how they affect literacy, and what teachers can do to create more successful learning environments. Students will explore areas of the brain responsible for executive functioning and varied manifestations of its dysfunction. You will learn to distinguish between behaviors that appear to be defiance or laziness and conditions causing these behaviors. Through readings, multi-media, and interactive activities, students will develop a new lens through which to consider student learning, and strategies to assist these students in their ability to access content and demonstrate understanding. (D. Tracht, a visiting winter term instructor)

Debbie Tracht, MA currently teaches educators about ADHS, Executive Function and Literacy, and holds a Certificate of Graduate Studies on the Mind, Brain, and Teaching from Jonhs Hopkins School of Education.  You can learn more about her and her work at www.middleburycenter.com.

EDST/INTD 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Basic sitting and walking meditation will be taught and intensively practiced. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Truth should be verified by one’s experience. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or INTD/EDST 0125) AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

English and American Literatures

ENAM 1003 Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as the first “modern” novel and as one of the best novels ever written.  First published in serial form in France in 1856, this story of a deeply dissatisfied provincial wife provoked a sensation, culminating in a spectacular state trial of author and publisher on charges of public immorality.  Those events have long since faded into history, but the novel’s freshness, brilliance, psychological power, and literary influence can be felt to this day. In this course we will read the novel in two English translations, briefly review its historical and cultural context and its enduring literary heritage, and conclude with its most recent film adaptation, by Claude Chabrol (1991).  LIT (D. Price)

ENAM/LITS 1022 Kafka and his Influence
This course is an intensive inquiry into the work and reach of Franz Kafka.  In addition to reading his novels, his stories, his letters and diaries, and his aphorisms, we will take up some of the voluminous and often highly imaginative writings on Kafka, with an eye towards fashioning some ideas, and some writings, of our own.  EUR, LIT, PHL (R. Cohen)

ENAM/CMLT 1027 England’s Ovid: Grabbing Back the Myth (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will read Ovid’s Latin compendium of foundational mythical stories, the Metamorphoses, in two important early modern English translations: 1) the 16th-century version by Arthur Golding (the very one that Shakespeare read), which Ezra Pound called “the most beautiful book in the English language”; and 2) the 17th-century version by George Sandys, which contains allegorical commentaries and elaborate synoptic engravings. We will discuss these myths with an emphasis on gender politics and oral storytelling, and sometimes discuss how they reemerge in English literature. We will also examine a rare first edition of the Sandys edition (1623) which is owned by Middlebury College’s Special Collections, in addition to a modern annotated edition. The material for the course contains literary and graphic depictions of sexual violence, which will be critiqued from an unapologetically feminist perspective. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 1032 Underworld's American Archive
Don DeLillo’s Underworld is a dense and sprawling novel that defies easy summation. A masterpiece of contemporary prose fiction, it rewards careful consideration. In this course we will explore the novel in depth, and ask what strategies it uses to outline the chaotic contours of the second half of the twentieth century in America. What versions of American history are on offer here, and how can we use them to glean insight into our present lives? The novel works like a capacious wonder cabinet, providing us with a rich archive of modern American life. We will also explore this archive and ask what objects, emblems, and events DeLillo collects to tell the story of America’s recent past. We will consider the novel alongside films by Sergei Eisenstein, and critical and theoretical work by writers such as Jane Bennett, Robert Smithson, Walter Benjamin, and Karl Marx. LIT, AMR, NOR (P. Abatiell, visiting winter term instructor)

Patrick Abatiell ’07 is pursuing a PhD in English at New York University.

CRWR 0175 Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. ART (K. Gotthshall)

CRWR/EDST 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. (C. Cooper)

CRWR 0380 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video recorder--the tools of today's investigative journalists—students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Adobe Premiere files for video editing. Video cameras and tripods supplied by the college. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105. LIT (P. Lourie, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book about Norwegian polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen.  He is also producing multimedia stories for the National Science Foundation about a month-long icebreaker trip he made last fall in the Canadian Arctic.

CRWR 1006 Writing What You Don't Know: The Ethics and Craft of Narrative Journalism
The tradition of immersive journalism is full of ethical and practical landmines. How do journalists artfully and respectfully tell stories about places unfamiliar to them? How do they gain access and trust in vulnerable communities? How do they evoke a place, an individual, or a community without objectifying their subject? In this course we will study magazine ethics and read work by the genre’s most effective storytellers, including Ted Conover, Adrienne Nicole Leblanc, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Luis Alberto Urrea, and Nikole Hannah-Jones. Students will undertake two story assignments of their own. We will workshop reporting plans and drafts during class sessions. (S. Crane-Murdoch, L. Markham, visiting winter term instructors)

Sierra Crane-Murdoch ‘09.5 is a journalist whose articles and essays have appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, The New Yorker online, Orion, The Atlantic, VICE, and High Country News, where she has been a staff writer and a contributing editor. Her first book will be published by Spiegel & Grau.

Lauren Markham ‘05.5 is a writer, reporter, and author of the forthcoming book about child migration from Central America, The Far Away Brothers, which will be published by Crown in September 2017. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming from Harper’s, The New Yorker online, The Guardian, VICE, Guernica, This American Life, and VQR, where she is a contributing editor.

CRWR 1007 From Page to Podcast: Writing Audio Fiction
This course will have students writing short fiction, which will then be produced for podcast in collaboration with students in From Page to Podcast: Producing Audio Fiction. In the first half of the course, we will discuss craft through assigned readings and lecture, and students will present work for peer critique. Writers will then be paired with production students. Students can expect to gain skills applicable to a writer's life (e.g., working with an editor, giving a public reading, choosing an excerpt). Students will complete the term with a finished story—both on the page and in podcast. ART (A. Krupman, visiting winter term instructor)

Amanda Krupman is a writer and editor in Brooklyn, NY. Her short fiction and essays have been published in numerous print and digital magazines and journals.

Environmental Studies

ENVS/ARBC 0245 Human-Environment Relations: Middle East
In this course we will begin with an environmental history of Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, asking such questions as: How does politics affect conservation practice? To what extent are formulations of nature constructed socially and politically? Whose rights are affected by protected areas and who decides governance criteria? The objectives of this course include providing students with an understanding of human-environment relations theory by addressing the regional specifics of modern environmental and social histories of these countries. We will look at animals, water, and forests in the literature of NGOs, UNEP reports, media, policy papers, and the academic literature. (One of the following: ENVS 0112, GEOG 0100, IGST 0101, SOAN 0103; Or by approval) AAL, MDE, SOC (R. Greeley)

ENVS 1026 Impact Investing for a Sustainable Planet
In this course we will explore the field of impact investing, with specific emphasis on its evolution, company case studies, and current players in the field. We will look at “first movers”, “lost leaders”, and growth companies which sustainably manage natural resources, mitigate climate change, and protect ecosystems. We will focus on practical evaluative tools to undertake effective sourcing, due diligence, monitoring, and exits in building a solid portfolio of impact investments. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (T. Newmark, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tammy E. Newmark, a pioneer in impact investing for 20 years, is CEO and Managing Partner of EcoEnterprises Fund--a growth capital fund for sustainable ventures in emerging markets.

ENVS 1037 Global Energy Justice
Can classical and modern theories of justice help us make decisions about current and emerging energy systems? We will consider classical and modern theories of justice and apply them to the reality of energy systems. The course is divided into four parts: (1) understanding energy systems (including site visit) and how they promote and impede justice; (2) exploring justice theory and what it can offer when applied to energy problems; (3) examining policy mechanisms and tools that promote energy justice; and (4) analyzing case studies around the world in which communities or countries have made remarkable gains promoting energy justice.This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (M. Dworkin, visiting winter term instructor)

Michael Dworkin is Professor of Law and Founder of the Institute for Energy and the Environment at Vermont Law School.  He is past Chairman of the Vermont Public Service Board and was a management-partner of a telecommunications engineering company and an appellate litigator for the US EPA.  He serves or served on the Boards of Directors of a state-wide electric transmission company, the state energy efficiency company, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

ENVS 1038 Adirondack Park: Conversations about Conservation
The Adirondack Park is considered one of the world’s greatest experiments in conservation. Throughout its ~130 year history, this experiment has attempted to balance rigorous environmental protections for millions of wilderness acres with the economic realities of local residents who live within the park boundaries. We will undertake an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how park conservation is affected by climate change, rural economies, recreation, tourism, the local food movement, and political action.  Building upon course readings and discussions, and direct engagement with the Adirondack landscape, stakeholders, and local industries, students will develop practical policy recommendations to address pressing conservation issues in the park. This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (C. Dash, visiting winter term instructor)

Prof. Carolyn Dash majored in Biology at Kenyon College and received her Ph.D. in the Program for Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology at the University of Illinois.  Her research interests include conservation biology, disturbance ecology, climate change, and local food.

ENVS 1039 Dances with Avatar
Kevin Costner’s 1990 film Dances with Wolves and James Cameron’s 2009 Avatar share more than plot, character, and setting.  Both tell stories of colonial invasion, military conquest, and environmental exploitation.  Both feature Euro-American protagonists transformed physically and culturally by contact with indigenous peoples; both “heroes” try to “save” native peoples and “nature” from annihilation.  In this course we will critique ideas of nature, race, gender, and technology and situate both films in historical, cultural, and ideological context.  We will also examine critical responses as reflections of cultural debates at the turn of the 21th century.  AMR, NOR, SOC (K. Morse)

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 0252 Authorship and Cinema: Lubitsch, Hawks, Wilder, and Allen
In this course we will study four masters of classical Hollywood comedy—Ernst Lubitsch, Howard Hawks, Billy Wilder, and the contemporary filmmaker Woody Allen.  One week will be spent on each filmmaker with screenings of 3-4 films.  Readings will consist of interviews, biography, and critical commentaries.  Class sessions will emphasize close study of select scenes and discussion. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102, or by approval) ART, AMR, NOR (L. Grindon)

FMMC 1018 Cinematography
This is an advanced video production course focused on narrative film lighting, composition, and camera movement.  We will produce five short assignments, research and analyze the body of work of a professional cinematographer, and capture and share one photo per day.  We will learn lighting and camera movement techniques in a hands-on collaborative environment, and will attend lectures and screenings to develop a better understanding of the art and craft of cinematography.  Each day that we meet we will spend the first hour performing increasingly technical lighting and camera setups, the second hour learning about new concepts in a traditional lecture setting, and the third hour screening short films and completed assignments. ART (E. Murphy, visiting winter term instructor)

Ethan Murphy is the Media Production Specialist in the Film and Media Culture Department.  Over the last nine years he has worked closely with faculty, students, and staff at Middlebury in production courses and studies courses with a production component.  Ethan has worked on television shows, independent films, live broadcasts, commercials, and music videos for PBS Frontline, MTV, and HGTV.  He recently completed The Camera and Visual Storytelling workshop with Steven Fierberg , ASC, The Camera Operator Workshop with Amy Vincent, ASC and Tom Richmond, ASC and the Feature Film Lighting Workshop with Mo Flam at Maine Media Workshop + College.  His cinematography work screened at film festivals throughout Vermont.

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (D. Miranda Hardyl)

FMMC 1026 From Page to Podcast: Producing Audio Fiction
This course offers a deep dive into the world of audio fiction. As podcasts grow in popularity, so do the number and quality of fictional series. In this course students will read contemporary short fiction and listen extensively to great audio fiction including historical audio drama and recent podcasts such as The Truth and Welcome to Night Vale.  Finally, in a unique collaboration between this course and another called From Page to Podcast: Writing Audio Fiction, students will produce fictional audio works with stories created by Middlebury students in the other course.  By the end of this course, students will have developed studio recording and sound editing basics, a small archive of original foley, as well as a completed work of audio fiction. We will premiere the final in a special “listening room” that we organize together.  ART (E. Davis, visiting winter term instructor)

Erin Davis is the producer of the Middlebury original podcast It’s Not What You Think. Her audio work has aired on All Things Considered, Studio 360 and elsewhere. Her documentary film The Land premiered at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. She lives in Weybridge, VT.

FMMC 1027 Antiheroes in the Films of Quentin Tarantino: Adaptation, Appropriation, Remix
Quentin Tarantino is universally lauded as one of the most original and influential contemporary American filmmakers even as his unique anti-establishment work has stirred controversy with its reliance on graphic violence. In this course we will study Tarantino’s films as adaptations, appropriations, and remixes of literature (Elmore Leonard), the work of comedians (Pryor, Carlin), cinema auteurs (Kurosawa, Godard) and pop culture icons (Madonna), as well as a variety of international cinematic genres (wuxia, noir, spaghetti westerns). We will explore how Tarantino blends seamlessly American and foreign cultural elements to create powerful anti-establishment characters that have inspired young filmmakers worldwide. ART, NOR, AMR (N. Dobreva)

FMMC 1135 Script Development Workshop
This course is organized in conjunction with the Middlebury Script Lab, a screenwriting residential workshop that brings together emerging screenwriters and established industry professionals. The students will attend screenwriting workshops, masterclasses and informal meetings with visiting writers and producers. Students will explore ideation techniques, finding a story that is appropriate for a feature length script, outlining and pitching. We will discuss dramatic structure in depth and explore the high-concept potential of your screenplay ideas, examining their aesthetic as well as their business possibilities. We will assemble a pitching packet for your projects, including synopsis, logline, mood board and fantasy casting. At the conclusion of this class, you will have a solid outline supported by pitching materials and a clear overview of your material. The class makes an excellent preparation for students who want to take FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II or who plan to write a screenplay for their senior tutorial. (FMMC 0106 or instructor approval) ART (I. Uricaru)

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (B. Humbert, J. Weber)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS/LNGT 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically focusing on gender. Throughout the course, students will practice translating non-literary texts and will present their translations in class. (K. Hanta, visiting winter term instructor)

Karin Hanta is a translator with 25 years of experience and a PhD in Translation Studies (University of Vienna).

Geography

GEOG 1025 Geographies of Urban Abandonment
Abandoned properties are a ubiquitous feature of post-industrial U.S. cities, markers of the 2008 housing crisis, and perennial sources of socio-political, economic, and environmental concern. In this course we will explore the complex processes that contribute to property abandonment, and the ways that city governments and grassroots organizations are conceptualizing urban vacancy as a ‘problem’ and an ‘opportunity.’ Combining critical perspectives such as Neil Smith’s The New Urban Frontier with films such as Requiem for Detroit? and The Garden, we will analyze representations and processes of urban abandonment. Students will engage in primary research to examine specific case studies. SOC (E. Noterman, visiting winter term instructor)

Elsa Noterman is currently a PhD student in the Geography Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison whose work brings together feminist and critical geographies, legal scholarship, and a focus on grassroots organizing. Her dissertation develops critical geographies of urban abandonment by examining not only current city policies aimed at managing abandoned properties, but also community-based efforts to (re)claim these spaces as urban commons and produce grassroots geographies that challenge racialized, classed, and gendered (re)productions of vacancy.

Geology

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

GEOL 1035 Field Geology in Active Tectonic Environments
In this off-campus course students will gain experience through field-based exercises designed to emphasize observation, sample and data collection, and interpretation of geologic phenomena. By carrying out field work in diverse tectonic environments, students will be exposed to geologic processes complementary to those found in New England. Students will gain a broader understanding of topics including tectonics, volcanism, stratigraphy, soil formation, hydrology, structural analyses, field mapping, geomorphology and hazard assessment. The four-week course consists of three weeks off-campus followed by one week on-campus, culminating with small group research projects and reports emphasizing integration of field observations with instrumental analysis in on-campus laboratories.  Approval Only (any two 200-level courses in GEOL; priority to Juniors and Seniors) (P. Ryan & K. Walowski)

Greek

GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I
This course is a rapid and intensive introduction to classical Greek for beginners. The aim of the course is to prepare students to read the major authors of Greek literature. In addition to a systematic study of grammar and syntax, we will also read excerpts from a variety of ancient authors. LNG (J. Chaplin, M. Witkin)

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (M. Hoffman, B. Matthias)

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Aloni)

History

HIST 0115 Genocides Throughout History
With the devastation of the Holocaust and other more recent events, the study of genocide has mainly focused on the modern period. Yet, mass killings and other atrocities abound in earlier centuries as well.  In this course we will focus on examples across time and space to gain a more comprehensive understanding of such phenomena.  We will consider the very meaning of “genocide” as well as the suitability of other terms.  We will also discuss different explanations of everything from perpetrators’ motivations to victims’ responses.  Finally, we will examine the possibility of preventing genocides. CMP, HIS, SOC (R. Bennette)

HIST 1027 Introduction to Global Slaveries
Slavery has existed in myriad forms for thousands of years, appearing in Ancient Greece, medieval Russia, nineteenth-century Brazil, and even the twenty-first century United States. In this course we will explore different forms of bondage such as debt labor, forced labor, domestic servitude, and sexual slavery, placing each within its historical context to comprehend its defining characteristics. Students will identify the similarities between institutions of slavery that differ geographically or temporally and pinpoint their unique features. We will also assess the factors that led to slavery’s evolution or demise in different civilizations, striving to find patterns across the data. CMP, HIS (A. Brickell Bellows, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Bellows is a Project Historian at the New York Historical Society. She specializes in the study of slavery in transnational perspective.

 History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0218 History of Photography
In this course we will consider the history of photography as a medium from its inception in 1839 to the present. We will focus on technological advances in photography, aesthetic developments, and the evolution of acceptance of photography as an art form. We will examine the use of photography in different genres, such as landscape, portraiture, and documentation. To illustrate our study, we will rely on examples of photographs available in the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, ART, NOR (K. Hoving)

HARC 1023 From Broadsheets to Banners: Poster Design Theory and Practice
Our world is a designed hybrid of text and image. Understanding the constructions that intertwine these component parts is an essential skill, which graphic design explicitly engages. In this course we will explore its history and practice through poster design. This format offers a variety of challenges for beginning designers in its uses of direction, narrative, and illustration, and central to the course will be the history and theory of poster design, mixing research and studio exercises. Each student will choose and research their own topic, and design and exhibit an 18” x 24” poster. ART (S. Alavi, visiting winter term instructor)

With an MFA in Design, and a BS in Graphic Design, she has been designing for 16 years.

HARC 1024 Mircro-Housing: An Introduction to Architectural Design
In this course we will focus on the “tiny house movement.” The need for affordable, energy- efficient, and flexible housing is ever increasing. In urban areas especially, livability and density are in question. Students will design and build models of micro-dwellings, single and multi-unit residences, that address these and other issues. Middlebury alumnus Addison Godine (’11.5) will join as a Cameron Visiting Architect and share his experiences with Middlebury’s 2011 Solar Decathlon house and his latest endeavor: uhu (urban housing unit), the micro-residence he designed to inspire people to live more lightly on the planet.  In this course, students will also develop the skills needed to design and represent their architectural concepts.  Students may substitute this course for HARC 0130 in the History of Art & Architecture major.  (This course is not open to students who have taken HARC 0130) ART (A. Murray)

HARC 1025 Architectural Fantasies
How have buildings stirred the imagination and fulfilled specific kinds of desires at specific historical moments? In this course we will consider the often blurred lines and tensions between fantasy and reality in architecture. Class lectures and discussion will consider fantastical architecture in all its forms and as it was ‘realized’ from the Renaissance to the present day across different cultures and media (paper, models, reproductions, etc),Examples include Leonardo da Vinci’s Golden Horn Bridge, Piranesi’s Capriccios and Carceri, Giulio Camillo’s fabled Memory Theater; Boullée’s Cenotaph, Vladimir Tatlin’s Monument to the Third International, world-exposition pavilions, and Archigram’s drawings in the 1970’s, just to name a few.  ART, HIS, EUR (D. Karakas)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (J. Pirone, a visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2018
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, impact-focused learning. Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management. Acceptance into MiddCORE 2018 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter. A limited amount of financial aid is available to students who might otherwise be unable to enroll due to work-study or other financial obligations. Applications must be received by 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27. Decisions will be emailed by 8 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 29. (Pass/Fail; Approval Required) (W. Nash, C. Brown)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Students will go from idea to company launch quickly and effectively through deliverables, class discussions, and hands-on mentoring both from professors and visiting entrepreneurs and investors.  Class will be focused on building a prototype, testing the market, and engaging with customers, so students should be prepared for significant hands-on work outside of class time.  At the conclusion of the course, students will compete with their classmates in a pitch competition. To enroll in the course, students must submit a business proposal (either for profit or not for profit idea) and meet in person with one of the instructors, prior to registration. In one paragraph, please explain: 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2) the proposed product or solution to solve this problem; and 3) why you are well-suited to tackle this project. Please submit proposals to MiddEnt@middlebury.edu (by Friday October 28th at the latest). If you do not have an idea but are interested in being a team member, please indicate your interests and relevant skill sets in an email to the same address.  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, S. Roach-Gerber visiting winter term instructors)

David Bradbury and Samantha Roach-Gerber work at the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), an independent nonprofit technology business incubation program offering business mentoring, venture capital, office facilities, and substantive networking to the region’s entrepreneurs and emerging next generation employers. www.VermontTechnologies.com.

INTD 1100 Journeys to the Edge: Mountain Exploration and Adventure
In this course we will examine the history and culture of mountain exploration and adventure through literature, nonfiction narrative, film, and guest presentations.  Students will trace changing cultural attitudes toward risk, adventure, masculinity, and wildness.  Although we will examine different aspects of exploration, we will focus primarily on Euro-American/western romantic approaches to mountains.  Readings will include MacFarlane’s Mountains of the Mind; Bernstein’s Ascent, and excerpts from work by Jon Krakauer, Jack Kerouac, Roderick Nash, Joe Simpson, and others. This course counts as an approved humanities cognate for environmental studies (S. Barnicle)

Scott has been the Dean for Atwater Commons since 1999 and brings his passion for the outdoors to this course from personal experience as well as a long term passion of following the adventures and exploration of others both personally and through literature.

INTD 1118 Modern Media and Healthcare: Beyond Viagra and Grey's Anatomy
News, entertainment, commercials, TV, movies, on line and social modern media is the primary source of health information for consumers. Much is credible but there is also no shortage of contradictory and incorrect health content.  In this course we will examine various media forms and their influence on health perceptions, expectations, priorities, and beliefs. Using current examples, we will flesh out how particular health issues break into public consciousness, change behaviors, and evolve and drive healthcare policy, as well as cite case histories where media spin led to unwarranted consumer hysteria.  The course will prompt analytic skills to comprehend "raw" medical studies to compare with popular media interpretations while at the other extreme will look at media content such as House and Scrubs. The term culminates in hands on multi-media project to prompt a consumer response to an emerging health issue or behavior. AMR, NOR, SOC (H. Torman, a visiting winter term instructor)

Howard Torman, MD, is a former national medical correspondent and health editor for CBS News. He is currently a medical media consultant.

INTD 1123 Social Media, Communication, Community, and Connections in an Online World
In this course we will explore how our online (driven) lives impact relationships, expressions of emotion, values, and the ways in which we portray our humanity. As we bring the distant (e.g., family, friends, acquaintances, and others) close, are we making those close to us more distant? Do the demands for “being connected” alter our experiences of intimacy and the tones and textures of how we relate to and with each other, and do they therein affect how we treat our fellow human beings? Does the prevalence of social media in our lives, as evidenced in recent local, national, and global events inform and shape us in positive and/or negative ways? SOC (R. Marum, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Marum is a clinical psychologist and writer in private practice in Middlebury and North Ferrisburgh, Vermont who also makes biannual trips to Southern California for consultations with individuals and organizations.

INTD/EDST 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Basic sitting and walking meditation will be taught and intensively practiced. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Truth should be verified by one’s experience. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or INTD/EDST 0125) AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor.  AAL, LNG, SAF (W. Roki, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera’s focus is African languages and second language acquisition with special reference to the Kiswahili language. She is interested in how East and West African languages intersect. She is passionate in teaching the syntax of the Kiswahili language.

INTD 1154 Building the Japanese Boat
In this course we will build a traditional Japanese boat, using the construction as a backdrop to explore not only the technical aspects of boatbuilding, but also the cultural underpinnings of apprentice learning.  Traditional craft apprenticeships are still very much the norm in Japan - standing in stark contrast with our Western notions of teaching and learning.  Exploring how apprenticeship reflects aspects of Buddhist training will shine a light on students’ accepted notions of learning.  Readings will cover technical aspects of Japanese boatbuilding and its history and traditions, with particular emphasis on the pedagogy of craft training.  Students will keep a journal and write an 8-10 page final paper. AAL, NOA, ART (D. Brooks, visiting winter term instructor)

Douglas Brooks is a boatbuilder, writer, and researcher living in Vergennes, Vermont. He has studied Japanese boatbuilding since 1996, apprenticing with seven teachers from throughout Japan and has authored four books on Japanese boatbuilding.

INTD 1173 International Maternal and Child Health
In this course we will study Maternal and Child Health (MCH) using a multidisciplinary approach, which will provide perspective on determinants of health and the ways that various levels of society and culture influence the health of women and children around the world. Issues will include: human rights, water, nutrition, sexual/ reproductive health, childbirth, and infectious disease, as each relates to maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Students will utilize MCH indicators to describe MCH as a part of holistic global health, applying course concepts to illuminate the importance of MCH to socio-economic progress, sustainability, and ultimately, global development. This course will count as an elective towards the Global Health Minor. SOC (M. McLaughlin, a visiting winter term instructor) 

Meg is a global health professional, originally from Vermont, focusing on international maternal and child health with a strong focus on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); reproductive and sexual health, and preventable illness in children. I have worked in the non-profit and benefit corporation sectors supporting and completing projects in Africa (Uganda, Ghana, Burkina Faso), South America (Ecuador), Central America and the Caribbean (Honduras and Haiti).

INTD/SOAN 1185 Children's Play as Social Subversion
In this course we will look at historical and cultural interpretations of children’s play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control acting upon children’s time, space, and freedom, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class, and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work, and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play, exploring and moving beyond the conventional fixed equipment playgrounds which have been called “ghettoes for play” to critically examine material and social environments children create for themselves. SOC (M. Leichter-Saxby, a vising winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett University.

INTD/THEA 1186 The Art of the Argument: Making Your Case with Persuasive Performance
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes In this course we will practice the fundamentals of delivering arguments to a judge or jury.  Against the backdrop of the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Cohen v. California, students will learn about the First Amendment and freedom of speech, and will present a persuasive legal argument that may require them to advocate in favor of a position with which they disagree.  Students will explore how to respond to unpopular ideas and viewpoints by relying on persuasive argument techniques.  One week of this course will be co-taught by a visiting professor with a background and formal training in theater, during which time students will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors and the process by which they learn to persuade an audience.  At the same time, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers, with a focus on rational argument and discourse.  Through body language and vocal coaching, role-reversal, and performance exercises, students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose. ART, DED (M. Overbeck, R. Martin, visiting winter term instructors)

INTD 1188 Studying and Writing the Short Story
In this course we will look at fiction as something carefully, willfully crafted with vision and purpose.  We will become experts in appreciating how stories are built, what materials they use, where they want to take us, and how they manage to move us there.  We will read short stories and essays examining what writers are up to by way of point-of-view, narrative distance, tension, pacing, characterization, dialogue, setting, plot, and sentence rhythm.  As well, we will write several in-class creative-writing assignments, one 10–15 page short story to be workshopped, and one 7–8 page paper examining craft in a short story. ART (J. Obuchowski, visiting winter term instructor)

Janice Obuchowski is a fiction editor at the New England Review.  Her fiction has received a Special Mention in the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology, and her short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Gettysburg Review, Passages North, Slice, Grist Journal, and Seattle Review.  She has her BA in English from Cornell University, her MA in English from the University of Virginia, and her MFA in fiction from UC Irvine.

INTD 1189 Regions of France: Culture, Castles, & Wine
France is a patchwork of many regions, each boasting its own identity through its history and folklore, music and language, food and wine. In this course we will explore several French regions, including Brittany, the Loire Valley and Provence: their landscapes, economic and cultural history, culinary traditions—the notion of terroir—and the way in which they are portrayed in cinema and literature (including two novels by Provençal author Marcel Pagnol). Students will research the history, culture, and attributes of their own chosen or favorite region. [course taught in English] EUR (C. Frankel, visiting winter term instructor)

A Middlebury graduate (’79) now living in Brittany, Charles Frankel has written several books on French landscapes and terroir.

INTD 1190 Ethnomathematics: A Cultural View of Mathematical Ideas and Methods
What are the cultural roots of the mathematics we study and use today?  Even though it has been developed by individuals from widely varying cultural contexts, we take the verity, consistency, and universality of mathematics for granted.  How does the western tradition stand in comparison to the mathematics developed by indigenous societies, labor communities, religious traditions, and other groups that can be studied ethnographically?  By examining the cultural influences on people and the mathematics they practice, we shall deepen our understanding of mathematics and its relationship to society.  CMP  (J. Clookey, visiting winter term instructor)

Prof Clookey is mathematician and former Commons Dean with a special interest the mathematics of oral tradition cultures

INTD 1191 Emergence: Meeting Ground for Theology and Evolutionary Science
Emergence is the phenomenon of novel entities arising from elements whose characteristics provide no basis for anticipating the emergent entity. Examples include life emerging from inorganic elements and self-aware mindfulness from conglomerations of brain cells. In this course we will look at how the scientific exploration of emergence impacted philosophy and theology, including concepts of “God” as an actual evolving outcome of evolution. PHL (B. Feder, visiting winter term instructor)

Rev. Barnaby Feder was a longtime technology reporter for the New York Times before entering ministry in 2008. He serves the Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society in Middlebury.

INTD 1192 Truth a la Russe:the Russian Media from Gorbachev to Putin
In only a short 25-year period, the Russian media landscape has witnessed a move from communist censorship to an explosion of free speech and independent media, and then on to state sponsored propaganda and trolling.  Russia’s turbulent modern history and its relationship with the rest of the world is best explained by the development of its media and its ever changing relationship to what is called “reality.” By studying the Russian example, we will draw lessons about the role of journalism and propaganda in our own societies. We will discuss various aspects of media business, and students will develop an insider's perspective on political developments and entrepreneurship challenges in contemporary Russian society. EUR, CMP  (D. Sauer, visiting winter term instructor)

‘Independent Media’ which grew into the largest publishing house in Russia. His projects include the dailies ‘The Moscow Times’ and’Vedomosti’ (a JV with Wall Street Journal and Financial Times) and magazines from Playboy to Cosmopolitan. Since 2012 Sauer is President of RBK, one of last remaining independent news organizations- which is fighting an uphill battle to stay alive.

INTD 1193 The Origins and Politics of Graffiti and Street Art
Since its emergence in Philadelphia and New York City in the late 60s and 70s, graffiti writing has evolved into the most dynamic art form in urban culture to date, with global popularity. Through readings, films, and discussions, students will delve into the history, language, and techniques of graffiti writing, its evolution to street art, the role street art plays in the gentrification of blighted inner city areas, and the rise of arts districts through commodification of the art form. Students will also get to design and produce their own “tag” names, or nom de plume, utilizing techniques learned. ART (W. Condry, visiting winter term instructor)

Trenton, New Jersey native Will “Kasso” Condry is a renowned street artist currently living in Middlebury, Vermont. Considered the godfather of the Trenton art scene, Kasso continues to promote and produce graffiti-inspired art throughout the Northeast and the West Coast. Kasso previously served as the Alexander Twilight Artist-in-Residence at Middlebury College in 2017.

INTD/THEA 1194 Influence: the Art and Practice
The art of influence constituted one of the original liberal arts. Its central precept is trust: the sense that the speaker is genuine, speaks the truth, and shares the audience’s values. Beginning with the principles of classical rhetoric and leading up through modern decision theory and the use of influencers in social media, this course will cover established rhetorical techniques that build trust. In addition, we will practice the skills of Cicero’s five canons of oration in traditional, rich, and digital media. The class will culminate in a final project -- oration, video, persuasive essay, social-media campaign, or research paper. (D. Yeaton, J. Heinrichs, visiting winter term instructor)

Jay Heinrichs is the author of the New York Times bestselling Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion. As a persuasion and conflict consultant, Heinrichs has conducted influence strategy and training for clients as varied as Kaiser Permanente, Harvard, the European Speechwriters Association, Southwest Airlines, and NASA.

INTD 1196 Introduction to Media and Minorities
In this course we will learn a process for understanding how the media portray minorities. Students will be introduced to techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab that enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how social groups as diverse as immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will learn how to download bulk newspaper data from Lexis-Nexis, to process it using python notebooks, and to statistically analyze it using Stata as they work on a concrete project of their choice. (E. Bleich)

INTD 1197 Hate, Love, and Reconciliation in the Public Sphere
In this course we will study the power of love to effect social change. We will review major historic episodes, including the Civil Rights Movement, post-Apartheid reconciliation in South Africa, and current efforts – including Black Lives Matter - to address longstanding injustice. We will learn from historic (e.g. Ella Baker) and contemporary (e.g., Van Jones) leaders who promote love as a ‘force more powerful’ and also study the limits of love in the pursuit of justice and reconciliation. During the course, selected members of the college community will share their perspectives on the power and limits of love. SOC (J. Isham)

INTD 1198 Tolstoy's Anna Karenina
Acclaimed by many as the world’s greatest novel, Anna Karenina provides a vast panorama of Russian life in the 19th-century and of humanity in general. In it Tolstoy uses his intense imaginative insight to create some of the most memorable characters in literature. They play out dramatic contrasts between city and country life and numerous variations on love and family happiness. We will supplement the reading of the novel with selections from Tolstoy’s early and late fiction as well as his letters and diary. Students will write two short papers and take a required final examination. EUR, LIT (M. Katz, visiting winter term instructor)

Michael R. Katz is the C. V. Starr Professor of Russian and East European Studies at Middlebury College

INTD 1199 Impact of Preventive-Medicine Based Healthcare for the Individual, Community and Nation
Chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2 and metabolic syndrome, will be responsible for 5 deaths globally for every 2 deaths caused by infectious disease by the year 2020. The incidents of chronic stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia and fatigue among the general population are widespread. These causes of mortality and morbidity are related to lifestyle factors including diet and activity, as well as to environmental and social factors.  In this class students will gain an understanding of the basic biology & pathophysiology of common diseases. Preventive medicine strategies will be evaluated and applied to individual, community and national models. (M. Perchemlides, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Matthew Perchemlides is a Vermont based primary-care-provider, doctor of Naturopathic medicine and specialist in integrative medicine and oncology. As the owner of Specialized Natural Health Care he consults with patients locally and around the country on topics of disease prevention and management. www.DoctorPerch.com

INTD 1200 The Imagination of Disaster
The American atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945 and nuclear testing throughout the Cold War spawned disaster films in both the U.S. and Japan. Films imagining nuclear catastrophe and contamination emerged in several genres, including science fiction, film noirs, documentaries, anime, and even comedy. Susan Sontag’s seminal essay, “The Imagination of Disaster”, will be our touchstone for exploring nuclear fear in films from the 1950s to the 1980s. Students will analyze the ways in which the representation of nuclear apocalypse is similar and different across the two cultures.   Films for study include Godzilla (Honda, 1954), D.O.A. (Maté, 1950), Record of Living Being (Kurosawa, 1955), Kiss Me Deadly (Altman, 1955), Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (Kubrick, 1964), The Day the Earth Stood Still (Wise, 1951), Atomic Café  (Rafferty, 1982), Akira (Otomo, 1988), and Nausicaa in the Valley of the Wind (Miyazaki, 1984). AAL, ART, NOA, CMP (C. Cavanaugh)

INTD 1201 The Trial of Jon Snow: An Intro into the Criminal Justice System
Jon Snow is the prime suspect in a homicide being investigated by the Vermont Special Investigations Unit.  What charges will be filed? What will his defense be? In this course we will familiarize students with the Vermont Criminal Justice system through the lens of his case. Students will be asked to view and analyze evidence, examine trial issues surrounding competency to stand trial, self-defense and the voluntariness of confessions. These topics will be explored both through lecture and through practical experience. The course will culminate with the trial of Jon Snow.  (P. Bevere, visiting winter term instructor)

INTN 1052 Coaching and Issues in Sports
In this team-taught course we will examine coaching and its impact on students from elementary school through the college level. Students will develop a portfolio that will include coaching philosophy, sport psychology, physiology, and sport pedagogy. Each student will learn teaching techniques for his or her sport or sports of interest. Several guest speakers will lead discussions on current issues happening in the world of sports. Outside reading with response papers, in class participation, and a final portfolio will determine the grade. (Open to Juniors and Seniors only). (Athletic Faculty)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (I. Brancoli busdraghi, T. Van Order)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (K. Davis, A. Sasaki, M. Takahashi)

Jewish Studies

JWST/PHIL 1016 Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Philosophy
Hannah Arendt was one of the most dynamic and original thinkers of the twentieth century. She once described her philosophy as “thinking without banisters,” which meant engaging the ideas and events of her time without ideological preconditions. Topics of her work included the Holocaust and Israel, race theory and racism in America, nationalism, totalitarianism, and moral responsibility under dictatorship. Controversial but always innovative, her work provides an immediate gateway to the discussion of ethics, politics, and the purpose of philosophy. We will read selections from her Eichmann in Jerusalem, Responsibility and Judgement, Origins of Totalitarianism, and The Jewish Writings. We will also watch interviews and the feature film from director Margarethe von Trotte, Hannah Arendt (2012). PHL (E. Jacobson visiting winter term instructor)

Linguistics

LNGT/EDST 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003)  (J. McVeigh, visiting winter term instructor)

LNGT/GSFS 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically focusing on gender. Throughout the course, students will practice translating non-literary texts and will present their translations in class. (K. Hanta, visiting winter term instructor)

Karin Hanta is a translator with 25 years of experience and a PhD in Translation Studies (University of Vienna).

Literary Studies

LITS/ENAM 1022 Kafka and his Influence
This course is an intensive inquiry into the work and reach of Franz Kafka.  In addition to reading his novels, his stories, his letters and diaries, and his aphorisms, we will take up some of the voluminous and often highly imaginative writings on Kafka, with an eye towards fashioning some ideas, and some writings, of our own.  EUR, LIT, PHL (R. Cohen)

Music

MUSC 0235 Music Ethnography
In this course we will study various methods and techniques for conducting field research about musical phenomena. Students will learn how to design feasible research projects, document musical activities in human communities, analyze collected data, and present their findings. Class and out-of-class activities will include writing ethnographic notes, making audio/video recordings, conducting interviews, photography, writing research reports, and making oral presentations. Students may have the opportunity to do field research that will involve field equipment and editing software. Some background in reading or writing about music is recommended. ART, SOC (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (C. Christensen; D. Anderson, visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson (director) and Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 12th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Chicago (2016). 

Neuroscience

NSCI 1046 How Movement Affects the Mind: The Effects of Physical Activity on Brain Physiology and Function
The human brain evolved in an environment where movement was required for survival.  Though western culture lends itself to a sedentary lifestyle, research has revealed that physical activity enhances the brain in a myriad of ways.  In this course we will examine the effects of physical activity on brain structure, physiology, and function.  How does exercise affect our behavior and what are the mechanisms underlying these effects?  We will explore these answers from the cellular/molecular to the structural/functional level in both the healthy as well as the disordered brain.  SCI (J. Basso, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Julia Basso, a Middlebury graduate (’04.5), holds a PhD in Neuroscience, a BA in dance, and is a certified yoga teacher.  Her research focuses on the mind-body connection and how physical activity can be used as a way to optimize brain physiology and function.

Philosophy

PHIL 0211 Animal Ethics
What is the appropriate ethical relationship between humans and other animals?  This course is a systematic study of animal ethics, a field that has emerged as a response to the profound impact of human practices on other species and rising concern about animal use and treatment.  Topics may include livestock agriculture, hunting, animal experimentation, biodiversity and invasive species, companion animals, vegetarianism and veganism, animals in entertainment, zoos and aquariums, activist ethics, animal rights, animals and biotechnology, and animal cognition.  The perspectives we will explore have a significant bearing on how we understand ourselves and nature and what policies we will endorse in relation to other animals.  PHL (S. Fesmire)

PHIL/JWST 1016 Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Philosophy
Hannah Arendt was one of the most dynamic and original thinkers of the twentieth century. She once described her philosophy as “thinking without banisters,” which meant engaging the ideas and events of her time without ideological preconditions. Topics of her work included the Holocaust and Israel, race theory and racism in America, nationalism, totalitarianism, and moral responsibility under dictatorship. Controversial but always innovative, her work provides an immediate gateway to the discussion of ethics, politics, and the purpose of philosophy. We will read selections from her Eichmann in Jerusalem, Responsibility and Judgement, Origins of Totalitarianism, and The Jewish Writings. We will also watch interviews and the feature film from director Margarethe von Trotte, Hannah Arendt (2012). PHL (E. Jacobson visiting winter term instructor)

Phyiscs

PHYS 0302 Electromagnetic Waves
Maxwell's theory of the electromagnetic field provides the basis of our understanding of the nature of light, radio waves, infrared radiation, X-rays, and other forms of electromagnetic radiation. This course examines the behavior of electromagnetic waves starting from Maxwell's equations, the fundamental laws of electromagnetism. Topics include wave propagation in different materials; reflection and refraction at interfaces; applications in space communications, optics, and other fields; and relativistic electrodynamics. (PHYS 0301) SCI, DED (P. Hess)

Political Science

PSCI 1020 American Power: Soft Hard or Smart
Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Middle Eastern turmoil, and Russian expansionism have raised important questions about how the United States, now under a new administration, should use power to defend its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since WWII.  Using selected case studies, we will examine pro/con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with class debate and discussion, as well as discussion of relevant daily news reports written and presented by class members. CW, NOR, AMR, SOC (S. Sloan, visiting winter term instructor)

Stanley R. Sloan, a retired U.S. government foreign and defense policy specialist and research manager and currently a Visiting Scholar in Political Science at Middlebury, has taught Euro-Atlantic Relations during eight Middlebury Winter Terms and a course on the use of American power in five Winter Terms.  He lectures widely in Europe and the United States and is author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, reports for Congress and books including Defense of the West (Manchester University Press, 2016), Permanent Alliance? (Continuum, 2010), and The Use of U.S. Power, Implications for U.S. Interests (Georgetown University 2004). PSCI 1003 Euro-Atlantic Relations

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that didn’t fare as well as we emerged from the Great Recession? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Douglas)

James Douglas, '72, successfully sought the office of Governor in 2002 and was inaugurated as the 80th Governor of Vermont in January, 2003. He was re-elected in 2004, 2006, and 2008.

PSCI 1155 Adversaries and Allies: Diplomacy in World War II and the Vietnam War
We will examine the diplomacy before and during America's two most traumatic 20th Century wars. We will begin with the diplomatic origins of World War II in Europe, followed by the failed diplomacy between the United States and Japan. Then we will consider negotiations among the Western allied leaders: Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin.  The final half of the course will cover America's engagement in and escalation of the Vietnam War, and then move to Kissinger's secret negotiations with North Vietnam, as well as the troubled relationship between the U.S. and South Vietnam.  HIS (R. Leng)

Russell Leng, '60, is Jermain Emeritus Professor of Political Economy and International Law at Middlebury College.

PSCI 1156 The Maghreb after the 2011 Uprising
In this course students will investigate the root causes and consequences of the 2011 uprising on four nations of the Arab Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia.  We will investigate the factors that led the Tunisian and Libyan transitions to follow radically different paths and then examine the preventative measures taken by Morocco and Algeria to contain the ripple effect put into motion by the Tunisian and Libyan revolutions. Having developed familiarity with the national contexts of the Arab Spring in North Africa, we will focus on four concerns brought to the fore by its uprisings: transitional justice, human rights, neo-liberalism, and climate change. This course will provide students the opportunity to interview personalities from the Arab Maghreb through video conferences and to practice drafting reports on real case studies following the format utilized by think tanks in the United States. SOC (M. B'Barek, visiting winter term instructor)

Mabrouka M’Barek is an elected member of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (2011-2014), a research scholar at the Middle East Institute and a member of the Global Working Group Beyond Development.

PSCI 1157 South Asia Beyond New Delhi-Islamabad
In this course we shall focus on areas of South Asian politics, such North East India and Nepal, which are not as often studied. From the linguistic politics of the Brahmaputra Valley in Assam, to the Buddhist saffronization of Sri Lanka– we will delve into the non-security political angles that are not traditionally studied, yet are excellent for understanding issues such as religious conflicts and caste and tribal politics. Lectures and film screenings will be complemented with role-playing exercises and discussions with South Asia experts via Skype. AAL, SOA, SOC (R. Shahid, visiting winter term instructor)

Rudabeh Shahid, '10, is a doctoral candidate at Durham University, UK. Her PhD research is on the Bengali-speaking Muslim populations in India.

PSCI 1158 On Tyranny
In this course we will study tyranny, which has been called “a danger coeval with political life” (Leo Strauss). To understand that statement and how technology and ideology have changed tyranny, we will read classic works from political philosophy and literature (Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Republic VIII-IX and Charmides; Xenophon’s Hiero, or On Tyranny; Machiavelli’s Prince; and Shakespeare’s Macbeth) and modern works (Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political; Leo Strauss on Xenophon, followed by Alexander Kojeve’s Commentary and Strauss’s Restatement; Heidegger, “Question Concerning Technology”; Hannah Arendt’s Origins of Totalitarianism, vol. 3; and writing by one tyrant). EUR, PHL (M. Dry)

Psychology

PSYC 1103 Psychotherapy with Children Adolescents
How can psychological disorders be treated when the patient is a child? What does psychotherapy with children and adolescents look like? What role do parents play in the process? In this course we will examine how different clinical interventions can be used to address a child or adolescent’s problem behaviors. Students will learn about evidence-based treatments for the most common disorders of childhood (e.g., ADHD, anxiety, PTSD) and will critically examine the central theories and empirical evidence supporting these interventions. Students will also be exposed to clinical materials, such as case conceptualizations, artwork, and video clips. This course counts as elective credit towards teh Psychology major. SOC (V. Peisch, visiting winter term instructor)

Virginia is currently a fourth-year student in the Clinical and Developmental Ph.D. program at the University of Vermont. In her clinical work, Virginia has focused on treating disorders of childhood and adolescence. After completing her clinical internship, Virginia plans to pursue a career in teaching and academia.)

Religion

RELI 1023 Early Taoist Texts
In this course we will concentrate on the two great early Taoist (Daoist) texts, the Tao te ching (Daode
jing) and the Chuang–tzu (Zhuangzi), both of which date from the Warring States period (475 -221 b.c.e.) of China and yet remain widely read and studied. We will read them closely, in multiple translations, and consider questions of authorship, audience, and philosophical and religious content. We will wrestle at length with these wonderful and difficult texts, with attention first to their original context and then to their reception and interpretation in later East Asian religion, philosophy, and literature. (This course is not open to students who have taken RELI 0227). AAL, PHL (E. Morrison)

RELI 1036 The Way of the Ascetics: The Making of the Self in Christian Monasticism
The practice of asceticism appeared in ancient Christianity as a movement striving for a deeper spiritual life and connection with the Divine. Men and women withdrew into the wilderness to become fully attuned to God, engaged more empathetically with their human communities and the natural environment, and served the poor and socially marginalized.  We shall examine how their new model of living challenged the traditional formations of identity and power through cultivating a watchful mind and deepening awareness.  We shall also consider its possible relevance for our postmodern world. Readings will include the Gospel of Thomas, Desert Wisdom anthologies such as "The Philokalia," and works of American mystic Thomas Merton and novelist Annie Dillard. CMP, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

RELI 1042 Introspection in Challenging Times
Challenging times—whether personal, national, or global—commonly give rise to the challenge of introspection.  In this course we will examine a variety of writers who, in such times, have expressed their reflections in meditations, confessions, prayers, autobiographies, essays, poetry, journals, and letters.  The list includes emperors, bishops, monks, nuns, diplomats, slaves, activists, resistors, martyrs, and other ordinary people.  (Some names:  Augustine, Teresa, Tubman, Douglass, Weil, Frankel, Gandhi, Day, Morrison, and the Dalai Lama).  In addition to analysis, discussion, and work in small groups, students will explore writing in the various genres we examine as a way to develop their own approach to introspection in challenging times. LIT, PHL (L. Yarbrough)

RELI 1071 Voices of Nonviolence
Beginning with an overview of the teachings of various world religions relating to the theme of non-violence, we will proceed to examine the religious inspiration, activism, and writings of key figures such as: Tolstoy, Gandhi, Ghaffar Khan, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King, Jr., and César Chavez. We will test the adequacy of nonviolence as a response to conflict by exploring themes such as the humanity of the opponent, the challenge of despair and cynicism in the face of great obstacles, the place of spiritual practices in individual and community life, and the value (or problem) of redemptive suffering. PHL (This course counts as an elective towards the Religion major) (L. Jordan, visiting winter term instructor)

RELI 1074 Buddhism in the Modern World
In this course we will survey and analyze Buddhist traditions around the world, from the mid-19th century to the present. We will begin by examining traditional Buddhist cultures in Asia—their teachings, practices, and social and political organizations—and then analyze how they have variously responded to the challenges of colonialism, nationalism, science, individualism, and democracy. We will examine how these led to the assumptions underlying ‘Buddhist Modernism’ both in Asia and the West. Materials will include texts and films on traditional Buddhism, historical, social, and intellectual analyses of its transformations, as well as narratives of individuals’ lives. Lecture/discussion. PHL, CMP (W. Waldron)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Smorodinska, S. Rodonov)

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN 1032 Cinematic Sociology
In this course we will develop our sociological imagination by viewing, discussing, and analyzing popular films. Rather than considering them simply as "entertainment," we will explore the various ways that popular films can be a vehicle for social commentary, analysis, and criticism, particularly about controversial topics (such as race, gender, sexuality). This course is not open to students who have taken SOAN 0352 or FYSE 1430.  (Sociology). SOC (C. Han)

SOAN 1033 Stranger Danger
How do we come to think of some things as 'native,' and others as 'foreign,' ‘invasive,' or 'alien?' In this course we take a broad view of the stranger, examining when and how the unfamiliar becomes familiar, and when it becomes Other. Employing methodologies from cultural and linguistic anthropology, we explore topics such as: hospitality and kinship; immigration and citizenship; language politics and nativism; zebra mussels, honeybees, and little green men. (This course counts as an elective towards the SOAN major) SOC (D. Jones, visiting winter term instructor)

Deborah Jones ’04.5 received her PhD in Anthropology from University of Michigan. She works at the intersection of linguistic, political, and environmental anthropology.

SOAN 1034 Skull Wars: True Tales Behind Frenemies in Science
Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. Richard Leakey and Don Johanson. Lee Berger and Tim White. In this course we will examine how jealousy and competition drive knowledge production and sabotage in the hunt for human ancestors. We will do so by exploring how these personalities, and others, have leveraged the media, from the New York Times to National Geographic, to push forward their vision and status in science. Through scientific articles, popular books and movies, and documentaries, we will also explore some of the central questions that have undergirded paleoanthropology. (Anthropology) SOC (K. Brudvik, visiting winter term instructor)

SOAN/INTD 1185 Children's Play as Social Subversion
In this course we will look at historical and cultural interpretations of children’s play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control acting upon children’s time, space, and freedom, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class, and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work, and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play, exploring and moving beyond the conventional fixed equipment playgrounds which have been called “ghettoes for play” to critically examine material and social environments children create for themselves. SOC (M. Leichter-Saxby, a visiting winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett University

Spanish & Portuguese

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish                                 
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (L. Garcia, A. Fil)

SPAN 1302 Auto-fiction (Autobiographic) Writing
In this course we will focus on the development of personal writing.  Our goal is to produce written material that stems from the realm of our own subjectivity.  Confession, secret, memoire, autobiography, journal, letters, chronicle, and non-fiction writing will be central.  We will achieve our objectives through theory and practice of intimate writing.  We will also have the opportunity to read and discuss literary works of important Hispano-American authors (literature and theoretical works) including Cortázar, González-Valdés, Fernández, Giardinelli, Grijelmo, Larrosa, Latini, Mangel, Onetti, Piglia, Rodríguez, and Vargas Llosa. AAL, LNG (R. Chavez-Castaneda)

Richardo Chavez Castaneda is a Mexican writer with fifty published books. He teaches regularly at Middlebury College.

SPAN 1352 Salsa Music and the Assembly of a Collective Self
In this course we will experience Salsa music as a socio-cultural phenomenon as well as an instrument for storytelling. We will discuss topics such as migration, race, gender and mourning as leitmotifs for a collective self that sought a space to narrate its shared experiences in Salsa. Likewise, the relationship between the diaspora in New York and Puerto Rico will be examined. Some of the most well known Salsa hits, along with films and documentaries, literary texts, and cultural theories will be read and examined to strengthen the discussion. By understanding Salsa as a melting pot and/or as a guiso, one of the goals of the course is for students to be able to use musical experiences as a social and cultural manifestation that allows us to understand historical and social events. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above or by permission) AMR, CMP, LIT, LNG, NOR (M. Hernandez-Romero)

Student Led

STLD 1009 Zero Energy School Design
There are over 100,000 K-12 schools in the U.S. and these buildings are, on average, over 50 years old. Many of these schools will need to be replaced in the coming years and it is critical that designs today can meet the needs of the future.Designing schools to achieve Zero Energy presents an opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve the learning environment in classrooms, and save districts money. Zero Energy schools incorporate the latest advances in energy efficient building design and use on-site renewable energy to produce more electricity than they consume each year. In this course we will learn about the Zero Energy design process and develop a design for a Zero Energy elementary school to be built in Vermont. Approval Required (Credit/No Credit) (Z. Berzolla; advised by W. Amidon)

Studio Art

ART 1025 Experimental Material Lab
As an exploration through experimentation, this course aims to expose you to the widest array of sculptural materials possible in a limited amount of time. Each class will begin with an experiment designed to reveal the inherent properties of a new material, while also providing greater understanding of its traditional usage.  Using a variety of casting techniques (rigid, flexible, lost, life) and the Smooth-on catalog (an industry standard and the origin of nearly all movie makeup special effects) as our guide, we will unleash our triple beam balances and mix up, urethane rubber, foam rubber, alginate, plaster, latex rubber, hard and soft plastics, and more. Fast-paced individual and collaborative projects will eliminate any sense of preciousness towards final outcomes emphasizing the journey and not the end product. Slide lectures showcasing contemporary artists including  Folkert de Jong, John Isaacs, Tim Hawkinson, and David Altmejd will place these materials in context. No experience is required or expected.  This course requires a $100 lab fee that will provide all need materials. lect., lab ART (S. Mirling)

ART 1028 Introduction to Painting
In this class we will cover the technical and conceptual essentials of painting.  We will learn basic painting skills including building stretcher bars, priming, composition, and working with oil paint, and will cover principles of drawing, design, and color. Beyond the basics, this class will uncover painting’s specific capacity to underline the intersection of the “stuff of the world” and how we perceive it.  Moving through major movements of 20th century art, we will step into the perceptual and conceptual shoes of these moments and occupy them with their own individual expression.  Importance will be placed on class critiques, dialogue, and building a painting vocabulary.  Each student will be required to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials. ART (R. Horn, visiting winter term instructor)

Rebecca Watson Horn is an artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.F.A. from Cooper Union and an M.F.A. from Rutgers in painting. She has exhibited at Soloway, NY, Exit Art, NY, Cleopatras, NY, Recess, NY, Lyles and King, NY, David Lewis Gallery, NY, and Kristina Kite, LA.

*Included student fee to cover remaining supply expense

ART 1129 Drawing for Your Life
In this introductory class we will cover a variety of mark-making techniques and materials while we
strengthen observational skills and develop a facility with contour, value, color, and perspective.  Outside of class, a daily sketchbook practice will push us to investigate our lives through drawing: at once note-taking, journaling, and a potential pathway to personal growth and fulfillment.  Class sessions will provide time for drawing from still life arrangements and figure models, informal one-on-one instruction, and guided weekly critiques.  Each student is required to pay a fee of approximately $110 for materials.  ART (G. Ryer, visiting winter term instructor)

Glenna Ryer is an artist and costume designer based New York City.  She holds an MFA from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in costume design and a BFA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art in drawing and painting.  In addition to her design work, Glenna is a weekly guest lecturer at NYU Tisch’s graduate Department of Design for Stage and Film.

Theatre

THEA 1026 Physical Performance: The Emotional Body
Discover how to embody a character; slip under the skin of another being, gender, time, place, world; make a whole world visible through the articulation of your body; and evoke another era through the flick of a wrist. Join in an experiential journey through the body; learn movement and physical theatre techniques such as Laban, Alexander, Lecoq, animal studies, Rasa, Bartenieff Fundamentals, and Stanislavski.  Discover how physicality can be utilized to trigger emotions. We will apply these techniques to stage monologues and scenes of text based theatre. The course is practice based with supporting reading and filmed sources. (Open to Theater and Dance majors, others by approval) ART (V. Mildenberg, visiting winter term instructor)

Vanessa Mildenberg is a director, movement director and actor trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where is an academy associate and a post graduate in cross disciplinary pedagogy in Theatre and Dance from the Conservatoire of Dance and Drama and the University of Kent. As a cross disciplinary artist, her work is as deeply rooted in the text as in the living experience of the embodied performance.

THEA/INTD 1186 The Art of the Argument: Making Your Case with Persuasive Performance
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes In this course we will practice the fundamentals of delivering arguments to a judge or jury.  Against the backdrop of the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Cohen v. California, students will learn about the First Amendment and freedom of speech, and will present a persuasive legal argument that may require them to advocate in favor of a position with which they disagree.  Students will explore how to respond to unpopular ideas and viewpoints by relying on persuasive argument techniques.  One week of this course will be co-taught by a visiting professor with a background and formal training in theater, during which time students will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors and the process by which they learn to persuade an audience.  At the same time, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers, with a focus on rational argument and discourse.  Through body language and vocal coaching, role-reversal, and performance exercises, students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose. ART, DED (M. Overbeck and R. Martin, visiting winter term instructors)

THEA/INTD 1194 Influence: the Art and Practice
The art of influence constituted one of the original liberal arts. Its central precept is trust: the sense that the speaker is genuine, speaks the truth, and shares the audience’s values. Beginning with the principles of classical rhetoric and leading up through modern decision theory and the use of influencers in social media, this course will cover established rhetorical techniques that build trust. In addition, we will practice the skills of Cicero’s five canons of oration in traditional, rich, and digital media. The class will culminate in a final project -- oration, video, persuasive essay, social-media campaign, or research paper. (D. Yeaton, J. Heinrichs, visiting winter term instructor)

Jay Heinrichs is the author of the New York Times bestselling Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion. As a persuasion and conflict consultant, Heinrichs has conducted influence strategy and training for clients as varied as Kaiser Permanente, Harvard, the European Speechwriters Association, Southwest Airlines, and NASA.

Writing Program

WRPR 1005 Healing Through Writing

In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using Louise De Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, essays, and book excerpts that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own healing narratives in a workshop setting. Assignments will include short in-class writing prompts, 3 essays, Canvas responses, and a final portfolio of 15-20 pages of revised work. CW, LIT (J. Crystal, visiting winter term instructor) CW, LIT (J. Crystal, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jennifer Crystal is a writer and educator in Boston who focuses on writing to heal projects, narrative medicine, and travel writing. She teaches creative writing seminars and workshops at Grub Street Writing Center and is the author of Et Voilà: One Traveler’s Journey from Foreigner to Francophile. She is a weekly columnist for the Global Lyme Alliance, and is working on a book about her medical trajectory. She is a graduate of Middlebury College (’00) and earned her M.F.A. at Emerson College.

WRPR 1006 Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including personal columns, op-eds, critical reviews, and letters. We will work on developing critical thinking and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns, and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will publish their polished work on a class blog, and use social media to attract readers. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints. CW (S. Greenberg, a visiting winter term instructor)

Susan H. Greenberg is a journalist, essayist, and book editor. Her work has appeared in such publications as Newsweek, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Scientific American, and Middlebury magazine.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.