Middlebury

Winter Term 2015 Courses

Please note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled. Find further information on waitlists.

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    Environmental Studies
    Interdepartmental
    Linguistics
    Literary Studies
    Writing Program
    Student-Led Course

LANGUAGE Division
   Arabic          Japanese
   Chinese       Latin
   French         Portuguese
   German       Russian
   Hebrew        Spanish
   Italian     
 
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Economics
  Education Studies
 
Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology/Anthropology

 

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
   Comparative Lit

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Chemistry/Biochemistry
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Mathematics
   Physics

 

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


 

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (S. Liebhaber, R. Greeley)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well.  How do you randomize mice?  How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated?  If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer?  In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology.  We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results.  Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0392 Conservation Biology     
This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite course. (BIOL 0140) SCI (R. Hewitt, a visiting winter term instructor)

Rebecca Hewitt, '04, is an ecologist with the Institute of Arctic Biology and the International Arctic Research Center interested in the response of plants and microbes to climate change and their influence on biosphere-atmosphere interactions.

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies.  Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period.  Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) SCI (C. Combelles)

Chemistry & Biochemistry

CHEM 0302 Protein Structural Biology
In this course we will conduct an advanced investigation of protein structure, dynamics, and function. We will examine commonly-sampled structural motifs, domains, and folds highlighting evolutionary conservation of protein structure and function across organisms. Major contributions to the field of protein structural biology, including fold-founding structures, recent contributions to the identification of conformational intermediates, and descriptions of protein mechanism, will be critically evaluated as primary literature. We will also explore theoretical and practical aspects of diffraction-based, spectroscopic, computational, and hybrid approaches to protein structure determination with an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of primary data. (CHEM 0322 or [BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0241] or by approval) 9 hrs. lect. SCI  (K. Kazmier)

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (W. Xu, K. Wang, H. Yang, X. Jiang, B. Qian, a visiting winter term instructor)

Comparative Literature

CMLT 1001 “To Make a Long Story Short”--Encompassing Larger Worlds within Smaller Frames
In this course we will focus on the close reading and analysis of artistically compelling short stories, personal narratives, and reportage. We will read short works crafted by leading 20th and 21st century writers such as Joyce, Hemingway, Lu Xun, Kafka, Borges, Maugham, Orwell, Nabokov, Baldwin, Proulx, Munro, and Murakami. Divergent theoretical perspectives will be considered and contrasted. CW, LIT (J. Berninghausen)

Computer Science

CSCI 1004 Computer Programming for Novices
All 21st century learners should strive to attain basic programming skills. No matter what discipline we work in, we would all be better problem solvers and better users of computational tools if we had some facility with computer programming and some understanding of how software is built. In this course – for computer programming novices – we will learn the basics of coding using a variety of tools and languages including Scratch and JavaScript. Each class meeting will include both lecture and hands-on lab time.  (This course is not open to Computer Science majors) DED (A. Briggs)

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 1011 Computers and Society
In this course we will explore and write about important issues related to the impact of computers and computing technology on society. Topics to be explored include privacy and security, privacy and intellectual rights, environmental issues related to computing technologies, and the possibility of computer intelligence. (Approval required) CW (M. Dickerson)

Dance

ARDV 0216 Collaboration in the Arts: The Creative Process Continues
Taking the experience and knowledge produced in ARDV 0116, The Creative Process, as our starting place, we will collaborate to build more extended, complex, multi-media projects- including performances, installations, and hybrid works. We will research artistic collaboration, that slippery creative relationship with models in every variety of art production, to inspire our hands-on investigations and put them into historical and cultural context. Readings will come from recent literature on collaboration in the arts. Journals, short research papers/presentations, and daily in-class experimentation will culminate in substantial final projects that are original, collaborative, and unpredictable. (ARDV 0116, ARDV 0117, or equivalent, or by approval) ART (C. Brown)

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can  expect daily rehearsals  plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (T. Pollard)

DANC/ENVS 1029 Food, Culture, and Communication
In this course we will examine the dialogue between the science of body and the science of place. Our goals will be to enhance understanding of the human body through experiential anatomy and also heighten sensitivity to food both as culture and as a medium for communication. Weekly movement sessions, readings, and writing assignments will encourage a synthesis of personal experience with factual information. Beyond one exam and formal writing assignments, students will present a research/culinary project and maintain an exploratory journal. This course counts as DANC/ENVS 0277 for the Creative Arts Focus in Environmental Studies, or as a cognate for ES majors doing a science focus. ART, PE (B. Calvi, S. Esser, visiting winter term instructors)

Sophie Esser Calvi, ’03, is the Global Food Studies Coordinator at Middlebury College and holds a Masters in Food Culture and Communications.
Benjamin Esser Calvi, ’02, is the Director of Cider Making at Champlain Orchards, and holds a Masters in Viticulture and Enology.

Economics

 ECON 1023 Extending Financial Services to the Unbanked
In this course we will explore different interventions and tools used for poverty alleviation, financial inclusion, and the extension of financial services to the unbanked poor in emerging markets. We will look at the use of microfinance, microinsurance, financial literacy, and the rising use of technology including cell phone payment services to achieve these goals in developing countries. Guest speakers will discuss case studies and themes from the course. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Economics and towards the major in IPEC) SOC (E. Toder, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Elizabeth Toder, '90, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand 20 years ago, and since then has lived in Brasil, Argentina, Jordan, Haiti, and Vietnam developing microfinance and microinsurance programs. She has consulted on issues of financial inclusion for Build Change and the Slow Money movement and currently works on financing for water projects for Water.Org

Education Studies

EDST/LNGT 0205 Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and Educational Technology
In this course we will study the relationship between second language acquisition (SLA) theory, foreign language (FL) instruction, and the use of educational technology. We will examine various aspects of first and second language learning/acquisition. SLA theories and research findings will then provide a framework to explore FL instruction and computer assisted learning (CALL) applications. Based on an experiential project development approach, this course will offer students opportunities to critically assess existing CALL applications and to design learning materials based on SLA current and relevant research. Class sessions are designed to be hands-on and interactive.  (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1004) (A. Germain-Rutherford)

EDST 0317 Children and the Arts
This course will examine the integration of the arts into the elementary curriculum. Students will teach standards-based lessons that include the literary, performing, and visual arts. Activities will include art projects, sketch journals, reading assignments, and the exploration of community and teaching resources. Students will gain an understanding of the important role the arts can play in the curriculum through field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week) and class discussions. (Pass/Fail) ART (T. Weston)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (C. Cooper)

EDST 1002 Make Room: Teaching August Wilson
August Wilson has been hailed as “Theater's Poet of Black America,” yet many students have little exposure to this literary giant. In this course we will explore Wilson’s impressive cycle of 10 plays illustrating 20th century African-American experiences. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading, analyzing, and understanding Wilson’s work, exploring such influences as the blues, visual artist Romare Bearden, and playwright/poet Amiri Baraka. We will also use Critical Race Theory as an analytical tool for understanding Wilson’s significance within the larger context of race relations. The course will culminate with workshops at local schools and staged readings of Wilson’s work. ART, NOR, LIT (T. Affolter)

English and American Literatures

ENAM 1014 Poetry and the Marine Environment
In this course we will read and discuss Anglophone poetry about the sea, from the Old English poem The Seafarer to Derek Walcott’s The Sea is History. Our two main goals will be to investigate how poets imagine the marine environment and to bring multiple interpretive approaches to bear on literary texts from different regions and traditions. These approaches will include formal, contextual, and theoretical methods of inquiry. We will read poems by a diversity of poets, including John Masefield, Rudyard Kipling, Adrienne Rich, Derek Walcott, and Mary Oliver. LIT (D. Brayton)

ENAM/LITS 1022 Kafka and his Influence
This course is an intensive inquiry into the work and reach of Franz Kafka.  In addition to reading his novels, his stories, his letters and diaries, and his aphorisms, we will take up some of the voluminous and often highly imaginative writings on Kafka, with an eye towards fashioning some ideas, and some writings, of our own. (This course is a junior/senior seminar for ENAM majors; others by instructor approval)  EUR, LIT, PHL (R. Cohen)

ENAM/FMMC 1023 The Cinema of William Wyler
Among the pantheon of classic Hollywood directors William Wyler occupies a highly honored position: his films have won more academy awards than those of any other director (3 times Best Director for himself), and they span an extraordinary range of genres—spectacle (Ben Hur), western (The Big Country), novel adaptation (Wuthering Heights), play adaptation (The Letter), romantic comedy (Roman Holiday), musical (Funny Girl), crime (Dead End), and especially, human drama (The Best Years of Our Lives, Friendly Persuasion). We will study these films as examples of imaginative visual storytelling and visual dramatization: how the camera behaves and how images are arranged as a sequence to create meaning and feeling. Wyler’s themes are many, but after his experiences in WWII, Wyler focused on the question of pacifism vs. the grounds that make war necessary, as well as the concomitant question of justice vs. revenge. Each of Wyler’s films represents a unique achievement in the art of cinema and in the art of acting. ART, NOR (J. Bertolini)

ENAM 1024 Legends of King Arthur (I)
In this course we will explore the development of Arthurian legend in medieval Britain up to the 15th century. Analyzing a range of primary materials, from cryptic fragments to polished masterpieces, we will trace early representations of Arthur’s kingship; the adventures of knights such as Lancelot and Gawain; and the politics of magic, forbidden love, and treason. How did Arthurian legend emerge from the matrix of historical fact, folklore, and imaginative fiction? What accounts for its cultural appeal as a means of defining the present by appropriating the past? Readings in modern English translation will convey the diverse linguistic traditions of medieval Britain as enriched by continental literary forms. EUR, LIT (J. Fumo, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jamie Fumo has been a faculty member in the English Department at McGill University for ten years. She has published widely on medieval English literature and on the transmission of myth.

ENAM 1025 Narrative Arcs of Immigration
In this course we will look at representations of the migrant experience in America. What does it mean to leave everything behind on the chance that you or your children might build better lives? What is lost and what is gained in that gamble? How do migrants make sense of their achievement and how is that leap in itself an achievement, regardless of outcome. We will address these questions through three primary texts: Richard Rodriguez’s Hunger of Memory, Dinaw Mengestu’s The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, and Abraham Verghese’s My Own Country: A Doctor’s Story. This course counts as elective credit toward the ENAM major. CMP, NOR, LIT (N. Haddad, a visiting winter term instructor)

Nellie Haddad earned her BA and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley where she specialized in Early Modern Drama. New interests led her to earn an MA in International Studies from the University of South Carolina. She now focuses on literary representations of war and immigration.

ENAM 1026 Literary Autobiography and the Art of Self-Representation
Does autobiography reflect or construct identity?  Is autobiography obliged to tell the truth?  What formal structures and literary devices have writers used to represent themselves?  In this course we will explore the art of self-representation.  Along our path of inquiry we will encounter the regrets of St. Augustine, the wild extravagances of the sculptor Cellini, the "floating life" of Shen Fu, the moving narrative of Frederick Douglass, and Maggie Nelson's lyrical and experimental Bluets.  In addition to writing short literary analyses of the readings, students will author their own autobiographical essay and critique it. This course counts as elective credit toward the ENAM major. LIT (V. Valcik, a visiting winter term instructor)

Victor Valcik holds an MFA in Fiction from Warren Wilson College and has worked as an urban public high school teacher, and in the financial industry.

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet.  ART (K. Gottshall)

CRWR 0380 Workshop: Nonfiction
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 1002 Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this course will conceive, report, write, edit, lay out, and produce a publication for distribution among the J-term community. In the process, students will learn how to evaluate “newsworthiness,” research story ideas, conduct interviews, and write fair, accurate, and engaging articles on deadline. Our classroom will simulate the fast-paced environment of a newsroom, with students assuming a variety of jobs and editorial beats. We will discuss the legal and ethical issues facing today’s journalists, as well as the impact of digital and social media on the news business. Readings will include The Elements of Journalism and Blur by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, in addition to an assortment of exemplary articles. This course counts as Creative Writing elective credit. (S. Greenberg, a visiting winter term instructor)

Susan Greenberg is a career journalist who spent 22 years at Newsweek magazine. Currently working as a freelance writer, she has taught Journalism and New Media Studies at Phillips Academy in Andover, MA.

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera--the tools of today's investigative journalists--students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course counts as a Creative Writing elective. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105. LIT (P. Lourie, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book for Henry Holt about Jack London in the Klondike.

Environmental Studies

ENVS 1025 Kingdom Community Wind - Perspectives On Renewable Energy Development
In this course we will study in depth the Kingdom Community Wind Project in Lowell, Vermont and compare it to the Massachusetts Cape Wind Project, and California wind energy development.  We will consider perspectives of developers, opponents, and regulatory bodies. Using materials from the permitting process and contemporaneous news coverage, we will analyze the issues and arguments surrounding industrial wind development, and the positions taken by environmentalists.  We will ask the questions: How should renewable energy projects be sited? How have public discussions and projects in Massachusetts and California played out differently than those in Vermont and why? Are Vermont’s public policy tradeoffs different than those faced elsewhere? This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (B. Marks, a visiting winter term instructor)

Benjamin Marks is an attorney who has represented public utilities before the Vermont Public Service Board for the past seven years. 

ENVS 1026 Impact Investing for a Sustainable Planet
In this course, we will explore the field of impact investing, with specific emphasis on its evolution, company case studies and current players in the field.  We will look at “first movers”, “lost leaders” and growth companies which sustainably manage natural resources, mitigate climate change and protect ecosystems.  We will focus on practical investment tools to undertake an effective due diligence in order to build a solid portfolio of impact investments. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (T. Newmark, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tammy Newmark, a leader in the impact investing field, is Principal and CEO of EcoEnterprises Fund, a mezzanine fund for sustainable ventures in emerging markets. 

ENVS 1027 Farming and Food Policy
The interest in farming and food policy in the United States over the last several decades has grown dramatically. Examples range from movements such as Slow Food and localvores, the growth of organic food and Free Trade, and increased concerns with food equity. In this course we will examine why these issues have risen on the public agenda, and delve into the foundations of farming and food policy at the state, national, and international levels. The class will feature guests involved in food systems, and the culminating student project will focus on how various policies affect a particular food (such as apples or milk) or an aspect of the food system (such as food inspection requirements). This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. SOC (C. Klyza)

ENVS 1028 Social Justice and Environmental Justice
In this course we will study contemporary environmental justice in the context of social justice movements that have preceded them, paying particular attention to how these earlier movements have influenced the challenges and tactics of environmental justice today.  Drawing on the work of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Dorothy Day, and others, we will explore the roles race, class, gender, and religion have played in confronting poverty, racism, and violence.  We will then go on to examine contemporary environmental justice movements, exploring how these movements are rooted in as well as distinct from social justice movements of earlier periods. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. CW (5 spaces), NOR, PHL (R. Gould)

ENVS/DANC 1029 Food, Culture, and Communication
In this course we will examine the dialogue between the science of body and the science of place. Our goals will be to enhance understanding of the human body through experiential anatomy and also heighten sensitivity to food both as culture and as a medium for communication. Weekly movement sessions, readings, and writing assignments will encourage a synthesis of personal experience with factual information. Beyond one exam and formal writing assignments, students will present a research/culinary project and maintain an exploratory journal. This course counts as DANC/ENVS 0277 for the Creative Arts Focus in Environmental Studies, or as a cognate for ES majors doing a science focus. ART, PE (B. Calvi, S. Esser, visiting winter term instructors)

Sophie Esser Calvi, ’03, is the Global Food Studies Coordinator at Middlebury College and holds a Masters in Food Culture and Communications.
Benjamin Esser Calvi, ’02, is the Director of Cider Making at Champlain Orchards, and holds a Masters in Viticulture and Enology.

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 1015 Remix Culture
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and of cultural and political commentary. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media, with a focus on video remix. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work. ART, NOR, SOC (L. Stein)

FMMC 1018 Cinematography
Cinematography is an advanced video production course with a focus on narrative film lighting, composition, and camera movement.  In this course we will produce 4-5 short video assignments, will complete a research presentation on a cinematographer, will learn lighting and camera movement techniques in a hands-on collaborative environment, and will attend lectures and screenings to develop a better understanding of the art and craft of Cinematography.  Each day we will spend the first hour performing increasingly technical lighting and camera setups, the second hour learning about new concepts in a traditional lecture setting, and the third hour screening films. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) ART (E. Murphy, a visiting winter term instructor)

Ethan Murphy is the Media Production Specialist in the Film and Media Culture Department.  Ethan has worked on television shows, independent films, live broadcasts, commercials, and music videos for PBS Frontline, MTV, and HGTV.  He recently completed The Camera and Visual Storytelling workshop with Steven Fierberg, ASC.

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (J. Mittell)

FMMC/ENAM 1023 The Cinema of William Wyler
Among the pantheon of classic Hollywood directors William Wyler occupies a highly honored position: his films have won more academy awards than those of any other director (3 times Best Director for himself), and they span an extraordinary range of genres—spectacle (Ben Hur), western (The Big Country), novel adaptation (Wuthering Heights), play adaptation (The Letter), romantic comedy (Roman Holiday), musical (Funny Girl), crime (Dead End), and especially, human drama (The Best Years of Our Lives, Friendly Persuasion). We will study these films as examples of imaginative visual storytelling and visual dramatization: how the camera behaves and how images are arranged as a sequence to create meaning and feeling. Wyler’s themes are many, but after his experiences in WWII, Wyler focused on the question of pacifism vs. the grounds that make war necessary, as well as the concomitant question of justice vs. revenge. Each of Wyler’s films represents a unique achievement in the art of cinema and in the art of acting. ART, NOR (J. Bertolini)

FMMC 1134 Sound and Story: Documentary for the Airwaves
In this course students will learn the production skills and storytelling approach necessary to create compelling audio documentary. Through curated readings and practical exercises, we will cover field-recording basics and interview techniques which each student will use to produce their own short audio piece. At the conclusion of this seminar, each student will air their work in a public listening event. Each student will be required to purchase a set of studio quality, noise-canceling headphones (no ear buds) costing approximately $50. ART (E. Davis, a visiting winter term instructor)

Erin Davis’ audio documentary work has aired on NPR's All Things Considered and WNYC's Studio 360. She currently creates documentary for radio and film.

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (C. Nunley, W. Poulin-Deltour)

Geology

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (F. Feiereisen, R. Russi)

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Zakai) 

History

HIST 1026 The Partition of India: History Across Borders
The Partition of British India in 1947 heralded in the end of European empires in Asia. Simultaneously, religious and linguistic communities were violently divided as millions crossed the new national borders between Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. In this course we will explore how to write histories across borders and use alternative sources to examine Partition’s impact on everyday life, its place in national memory, and enduring trans-border connections. Drawing on fiction, film, and the digital Partition Archive, we will study Partition as way to view decolonization, the relationship of violence to nationalism, and the formation of borders and citizenship. This course counts as elective credit toward the History major. AAL, HIS (A. Amstutz, a visiting winter term instructor)

Andrew Amstutz,’08, is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Cornell University. He has spent several years living and studying in South Asia while conducting research as a Fulbright-Hays Fellow in India and Bangladesh.

History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design                      
This is a studio course that introduces its members to the values and methods used in architectural design and related disciplines.  A daily journal and intensive group and individual work within the studio space are requirements.  This course demands an exceptionally high commitment of time and energy. The course's goals are to use the process of design to gain insight regarding individual and community value systems, and to provide basic experience in the design professions.  It is recommended for anyone wishing to improve his or her appreciation for the built environment.  Students should anticipate that substantial additional time will be required in the studio in addition to the scheduled class time.  ART (J. McLeod)

HARC 0301 Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field.  To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW (E. Garrison)

HARC 0312 Museums, Managers of Consciousness? Institutional Critique and The Politics of Display
Since the 1960s many artists have focused their practices on exploring the apparent neutrality of cultural institutions, drawing attention to the economical, political, and social biases elided in the seemingly disinterested construction of artistic displays and museum collections. We will begin with a consideration of the initial practitioners of this tendency, known as Institutional Critique, and then also investigate feminist, postmodernist, and other more contemporary practices in this mode. Artists to be discussed will include Daniel Buren, Michael Asher, Hans Haacke, Martha Rosler, Louise Lawler, Fred Wilson, and Andrea Fraser. Readings will be drawn from artists' writings and primary documents, art history, philosophy, anthropology, and sociology. Students will write short papers in direct engagement with assigned readings and complete a research-based project that may take visual form. ART, HIS, NOR (E. Vazquez)

HARC 1009 Bollywood and Beyond: Topics and Themes in Indian Cinema
Bollywood, the term given to the Indian film industry juggernaut in Bombay, India, has gained an avid following of millions of viewers world-wide.  In this course we will provide a critical consideration of the history and development of the popular Indian film industry.  We will focus on such topics as the ideas and ideals of Indian art and visuality, notions of gender, idealized beauty, caste, class, religion, social norms, globalism, modernity, nationalism, and fundamentalism. Films are subtitled and no knowledge of another language is expected. Lectures, discussion, and readings will accompany screenings. AAL, ART (C. Packert)

HARC 1013 Writing About Florence
This course will offer a close examination of the great building projects of Medieval and Renaissance Florence -- from the Baptistery and Cathedral to the Uffizi, Laurentian Library, and Pitti Palace – with focus on their historic context, patrons (including the Medici and Rucellai), artists (including Brunelleschi, Alberti, and Michelangelo), history, and significance.  Through papers, we will explore the outlooks, forces, and people who gave shape to this influential city. ART, EUR, HIS (G. Andres)

HARC 1017 Design Studio: Can Design Activism Change Life?
Over the past twenty years design activism has been subject of increasing attention. It emphasizes participation, dialogue, and community engagement. In this studio we will generate ideas, and communicate those ideas visually, orally, and through writing. By way of readings and documentary films, we will explore design approaches from renowned socially engaged designers and collectives. Students will participate in workshops, conduct individual projects, work in teams, and make presentations on implementing their designs. We will discuss and develop projects that explore the effect of design activism on everyday life, the public sphere, and the built environment. ART (S. Lopez Barrera)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD/RELI 0298 Privilege and Poverty: The Ethics of Economic Inequality
In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality.  Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality.  We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” PHL, SOC (J. Davis)

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (A. Lynch, a visiting winter term instructor)

Alex Lynch has been teaching American Sign Language (ASL) and History of the Deaf Community at the University of Vermont since January 2011. Previously, he taught ASL at the University of Arizona.

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2015
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, and impact-focused learning.  Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management.  Acceptance into MiddCORE 2015 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter.  Applications are due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 31st.  Decisions will be emailed by Sunday evening, Nov. 1st. (Pass/Fail) (J. Holmes, J. Isham)

INTD 1075 Debating Global Literature: Ngugi Wa Thiongo's The Wizard of the Crow
In this interdisciplinary course, we will analyze eminent Kenyan writer Ngugi Wa Thiongo’s magisterial novel The Wizard of the Crow in the context of current debates on globalization, world literature, colonial and postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, and gender studies.   Set in a fictional African country, the novel weaves together the stories of corrupt political leaders and the ordinary folk who use extraordinary means—wizardry, underground organizing, and ritual performances—to oppose them and carve out a place for themselves.  Readings for the course will include Ngugi’s novel as well as theoretical readings from the fields of postcolonial studies, politics, history, development studies, and anthropology. AAL, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Students will go from idea to company launch quickly and effectively through deliverables, class discussions, and hands-on mentoring both from professors and visiting entrepreneurs and investors.  Class will be focused on building a prototype, testing the market, and engaging with customers, so students should be prepared for significant hands-on work outside of class time.  At the conclusion of the course, students will compete with their classmates in a pitch competition. To enroll in the course, students must submit a business proposal (either for profit or not for profit idea) and meet in person with one of the instructors, prior to registration. In one paragraph, please explain: 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2) the proposed product or solution to solve this problem; and 3) why you are well-suited to tackle this project. Please submit proposals to MiddEnt@middlebury.edu (by Friday October 29th at the latest). If you do not have an idea but are interested in being a team member, please indicate your interests and relevant skill sets in an email to the same address.  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, A. Stickney, visiting winter term instructors)

Andrew Stickney and David Bradbury operate the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), an independent nonprofit technology business incubation program offering business mentoring, venture capital, office facilities, and substantive networking to the region’s entrepreneurs and emerging next generation employers.  www.VermontTechnologies.com

INTD 1102 Hospice and End-of-Life Care
In this course we will explore psychological, sociological, and cultural experiences involving death, learn about the modern hospice movement, palliative care, community services for patients, spirituality and dying, as well as after-death rituals and grief issues.  Guest presenters will include members of the local hospice team (nurses, social worker, chaplain, volunteer coordinator, local palliative care physicians), and specialists in bereavement and dementia.  We will examine variables that impact the end of life and ways to create a meaningful dying experience.  Each student will select a specific interest to explore in depth.  This course will include all the elements required to become a certified hospice volunteer for those wishing to work with hospice patients in the community. (Pass/Fail) SOC (P. Baker, a visiting winter term instructor)

Priscilla Baker is Program Director of Hospice Volunteer Services, a community organization that provides volunteer support to hospice patients, families, and caregivers; bereavement support to anyone who has experienced loss; and community education to promote a healthy understanding of death, dying, and loss.

INTD 1108 From Font to Table
In an increasingly visual world understanding the constructions intertwining image and text are an essential skill. Graphic design explicitly engages these structures, and this course will explore its history and practice through the design of a class cookbook. The cookbook format offers a variety of challenges for the beginning designer in its uses of direction, narrative, and illustration.  Central to the course will be the history and theory of book design. Putting this history into practice, the class will decide on a cookbook format, and students will design their own cookbook. By term’s end we will have a print-ready project, and in printing the book we will explore the varied mechanics of actual book production.  Each student will be required to purchase Thinking With Type: A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors & Students by Ellen Lupton. Each student will also be required to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials. ART (S. Alavi, a visiting winter term instructor)

With a Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design, and an MFA in Design, Sepi Alavi has been designing books for 14 years.

INTD 1118 Modern Media and Healthcare: Beyond Viagra and Scrubs
News, entertainment, commercials, TV, movies, on line and social:  modern media is the primary source of health information for consumers. Much is helpful but there is also no shortage of contradictory and incorrect health content.  In this course we’ll look at various media forms and their influence on healthcare perceptions, expectations, priorities and beliefs. Current examples will flesh out how particular health issues break into public consciousness, evolve and drive healthcare policy, citing case histories where media spin led to pseudo medical crisis and consumer hysteria.  The course will prompt analytic skills to comprehend "raw" medical studies to contrast with popular media interpretations while at the other extreme will look at content including House, Scrubs, and even mens' and womens' health commercials and their contribution to the healthcare landscape. The term culminates in hands on multi-media project to prompt a consumer response to an emerging health issue or behavior. NOR, SOC (H. Torman, a visiting winter term instructor)

Howard Torman, M.D. is the former national medical correspondent for CBS News and has over 30 years of experience on national and local television. He has also served as a healthcare media consultant for television and pharma.

INTD 1123 Communication and Connectedness: The Real and the Virtual
Computers and other digital technologies, rightly called “just tools,” do ingenious things, but are they changing our sense of humanity? For millennia face to face communication was our only means for connecting with each other, and though new technologies have facilitated varieties of change in how we communicate, none has impacted us the way e-devices have during the last decades. Two consequences of new digital technologies are; blurring boundaries between the virtual and real, and the creation of a new solitude. As we bring the distant close are we making the close distant? In this course we address questions and issues regarding: What gains and losses do we experience through our use of new technologies? Does electronic accessibility create or deter yearned for connection(s)? Does the altering of virtual and real boundaries impact inter-personal problem solving, the establishment of values and trust, intergenerational communication, the importance of family, the expression and experience of emotions, and do e-devices effect the way we define life? SOC (R. Marum, a visiting winter term instructor)

Roger Marum, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Middlebury, and a writer.

INTD 1126 Philanthropy: Ethics and Practice
In this course we will explore important philosophical, political, and practical questions concerning philanthropy. We will ask philosophical questions about altruism, justice, and the ethics of giving.  We will examine organizations within the American charitable sector and the political, material, and cultural forces that shape them.  We will combine these two perspectives—philosophical and structural—to gain a better understanding of what philanthropy is or means today. We will then put these perspectives into action.  Using what we have learned, in a final group project students will evaluate different charitable organizations and present their findings to the class. PHL (S. Stroup, S. Viner)

INTD 1127 Trees and the Urban Forest
Trees play a very important, if often forgotten, role in our towns and cities, and across the globe.  Wildlife habitat, pollution and storm water abatement, carbon sequestration, and energy savings all arise from a healthy and active urban forest. In this class we will study the uses and values of the urban forest, basic tree biology and identification, arboricultural practices, planning and design, and resource management and community involvement. By using computer models to calculate factors in an urban forest setting, including carbon sequestration and pollution abatement, the class will help develop a complete tree planting proposal for an area in the Town of Middlebury (Not open to students who have taken BIOL 1003). This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the social sciences or humanities. SCI (T. Parsons, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tim Parsons is Middlebury College’s Landscape Horticulturist. He is a Certified Arborist by the International Society of Arboriculture, a Vermont Certified Horticulturist, and holds a B.S. in Plant and Soil Science from the University of Vermont.

INTD 1135 British Popular Culture
George Orwell once described the English in terms of their fondness for “the pub, the football match, the back garden, the fireside, and the ‘nice cup of tea'." But what would he have made of the Sex Pistols or Amy Winehouse? In this course we will trace a particular arc through post-1945 British popular culture in order to ask how we got from Orwell to The Office, from the Rolling Stones to Radiohead. We will ask how film, music, and TV prepared the ground for important episodes in British history: the “special relationship” with the United States, the modernization of sexuality, the transformation from welfare state to free market capitalism, the slow passage toward a multicultural society. ART, EUR, SOC (B. Graves, a visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1141 Recycle, Reuse, Reimagine: A Transformation Journey
In this course students will explore the process and possibilities that non-traditional and recycled found objects offer to create meaningful and imaginative works of art. Our main goal will be to look beyond the original function of objects and to creatively combine, arrange, and transform. With a strong focus on experimentation, students will complete several projects using different relief, assemblage, and construction techniques. No previous experience is necessary. Each student will be required to purchase their own tools and materials, costing approximately $120. ART (M. von Loebenstein, a visiting winter term instructor)

Michael Von Loebenstein (MFA) is a visual artist and educator living in Middlebury Vermont. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally.

INTD 1147 The Dutch Maritime Empire in the Long Seventeenth Century
[Cancelled]

INTD 1148 Law and Disorder: Criminal Practice and Procedure in the 21st Century
This course will familiarize students with both the Vermont Criminal Justice system and the rules of criminal procedure within which attorneys must operate.  This course will further develop students’ ability to view, analyze, and present a criminal case to a jury.  What decisions go into the filing of criminal charges, who are the players, what are the rights of the defendant, and how is a case prepared and presented to jury?  These questions will be explored through both lecture and practical experience.  The course will culminate with students participating in a mock trial. (P. Bevere, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Bevere, '96, is the Deputy State’s Attorney in Rutland, Vermont, and has experience handling cases ranging from domestic and sexual assaults to murder. 

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor. AAL, LNG (W. Karim-Sesay)

Dr. Waithera’s focus is African languages and second language acquisition with special reference to the Kiswahili language. She is interested in how East and West African languages intersect. She is passionate in teaching the syntax of the Kiswahili language.

INTD/PSCI 1153 Writing the Tunisian Constitution: Process and Problematics
In this course students will investigate the process of drafting Tunisia’s new constitution from the ground up.  Using transcripts of constitutional committee meetings and materials drawn from traditional media sources and social media, students will examine how the final draft language emerged from consensus-based decisions on three social and political topics: the distribution of political power, the role of religion in the state, and the equality of citizens’ rights.  Students will investigate which topics have been left out of the constitution, and why.  Alongside an intimate look at the partisan and personal factors that influenced debate on these topics in Tunisia, students will engage in comparative analysis of the Tunisian constitution of other recently composed constitutions. This course counts as elective credit toward the Political Science major. AAL, SOC (M. M’barek, a visiting winter term instructor)

Mabrouka M’barek was elected to the Tunisian Constituent Assembly in 2011 to represent Tunisians living in electoral circumscription of “the Americas and the rest of Europe” (all but France, Germany and Italy).  She has brought her professional background in auditing and transparency to bear in her constitutional and legislative work for the Constituent Assembly, including the authorship of a law to audit Tunisia’s debts.

INTD 1154 Ways of Learning: Building the Traditional Japanese Boat
In this course we will build a traditional Japanese boat, using its construction as a backdrop to explore the cultural underpinnings of apprentice learning.  Traditional craft apprenticeships are still very much the norm in Japan, standing in stark contrast to Western notions of teaching and learning.  Exploring how apprenticeship reflects aspects of Buddhist training will shine a light on students’ accepted notions of learning.  Readings will cover the history, traditions, and technical aspects of Japanese boatbuilding with emphasis on the pedagogy of craft training. Prior woodworking experience is not necessary. AAL, ART (D. Brooks, a visiting winter term instructor)

Douglas Brook is a boatbuilder, writer, and researcher.  He has researched traditional Japanese boatbuilding since 1996, apprenticing with five boatbuilders from throughout Japan.  He has published three books, and his work has been honored by the Japanese Ministry of Culture.  He recently received the American Crafts Council’s 2014 Rare Craft Fellowship Award.

INTD 1155 Emerson Electric: Winning the Global Game
In this course we will analyze how Emerson Electric transformed itself from a great domestic manufacturing company to a superior global technology leader. Innovative products and services, rigorous financial management, and long-term planning separate Emerson from its competitors. Students will learn what corporate and competitive globalization means in the 21st century, and will write an in-depth stock research report on Emerson and present their recommendations to the class. We will explore valuation and modeling and how to articulate our conclusions in a persuasive manner. Students will have an opportunity to interview Emerson senior management and Wall Street analysts and fund managers. Open to students who have completed an 0200-level Economics course. (B. Dewey, a visiting winter term instructor)

Bradley Dewey, ’86, has more than fifteen years of experience in equities research both as a sell-side senior analyst and as a hedge fund analyst. His global focus and fundamental approach to financial analysis will be emphasized throughout the course.

INTD 1156 Jewish Humor: No Joke!
What makes jokes funny? How do jokes connect with the absurd?  How do jokes ameliorate hardship?  Is “Jewish humor” distinct from other forms?  How?  In this course we will investigate Jewish humor, ranging from the Bible to Yiddish writers, its function in the face of persecution (even the Holocaust), and its role in contemporary America and Israel.  In addition to studying and enjoying Jewish jokes in literature, film, websites, and other sources, we will consider theories of humor, including Sigmund Freud’s famous essay on jokes, Henri Bergson’s Laughter, and Ted Cohen’s Philosophical Thoughts on Joking Matters. The course will emphasize oral presentation. CMP (R. Schine, M. Katz)

INTD 1157 Babylonian Knowledge: The Mesopotamian Way of Thought
How did ancient Mesopotamians understand their world?  In this course we will read through the major categories of knowledge created and employed in ancient Assyria and Babylonia, their “core curriculum.”  We will read this corpus of primary texts (in translation) that had to be mastered by scribes working in cuneiform languages, including proverbs, lists, omens, geographies, medicine, magic, law, mathematics, and accounting.  We will also examine the epistemological precepts on which Babylonian knowledge was constructed.  What was held to be knowable?  How was valid or authentic knowledge identified?  What roles did copying, editing, authorship, and literacy play in the production of knowledge? AAL, HIS (S. Richardson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Seth Richardson, '90, is an Assyriologist at the University of Chicago, where he is the Managing Editor of the Journal of Near Eastern Studies.  He has published three books and two dozen articles on the political and intellectual history of Mesopotamia and on Old Babylonian cuneiform texts.

INTD 1160 Financial Modeling and Data Analysis
Spreadsheets are amazing tools for organizing information, performing analysis, and persuading others.   In this hands-on course, we will use spreadsheets to evaluate financial projects and analyze data. In the finance portion of this course, we will build financial models to evaluate projects on both a pre-tax unleveraged basis and an after-tax leveraged basis.  Evaluation criteria such as NPV, IRR, coverages, and sensitivities will be covered. In the data portion of this course, we will create meaning from data sets by learning to organize, analyze, summarize, and present insights about the data.  Topics covered will include: Functions, Filters, Pivot Tables, and Basic Statistics. DED (J. Chroman, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jason Chroman, CFA/CPA, has spent the last two decades financing infrastructure projects and internet ventures.  Currently, he is Vice President of Finance for Streetline, a venture backed Silicon Valley firm aiming to solve the world’s parking problems

INTD 1161 Beginning Amharic
In this course students will be introduced to Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia, as well as to the politics and history of Ethiopia. We will focus on spoken Amharic, with more emphasis on listening and speaking than on reading and writing, learning how to use Amharic appropriately in the Ethiopian context. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor. AAL, LNG

INTD 1162 Creating Marketing Campaigns and Building Brand Awareness
In this course students will interact with a "real-world" client to create a marketing campaign and develop a persuasive oral and visual client presentation for a marketing case study.  Working in teams, we will develop individual marketing recommendations to pitch a new campaign for a local brand.  The teams will then compete against each other when presenting their marketing strategy to the client.  Students will incorporate marketing concepts in developing creative approaches and formulating each step of the marketing campaign. The project will incorporate fundamental concepts of financial literacy including business analysis, budgeting, and measurable response objectives. (M. Bartsch, a visiting winter term instructor)

Margo Bartsch has 15 years of experience in marketing and international advertising in the technology field in New York and Washington, DC.  She is an adjunct professor at Champlain College in the Robert Stiller School of Business, where she was recognized as the Adjunct Professor of the Year in 2014.

INTD 1163 Stories from the Bible
In this course we will examine a few of the great stories from the Bible, beginning with Cain and Abel. We will look at how these cornerstones of western culture have been read over time, and what we might find interesting, challenging, and useful (or not) in them today.  Our exploration will include everything from art and music to Midrash and philosophy. (B. McKibben)

Bill McKibben is  Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of, among other works, The Comforting Whirlwind: God, Job, and the Scale of Creation.

INTD 1164 Drones and Surveillance
We live in an era of satellite surveillance, video monitoring, and electronic surveillance and now the hot button topic of drones performing these tasks in addition to armed drones carrying out assassinations. In this seminar we will deal with the technical, policy, and legal issues involved in these subjects Privacy rights are often in conflict with the technical capabilities in these and other areas. Civil liberties are balanced against security interest, with or without the knowledge of the population. The course will provide the student with a working understanding of the issues involved in the current use of drones and overhead surveillance and will provide a look at the future uses and limitations, examining how civil liberties are and can be balanced against security interests. (G. Moore)

Dr. Moore is currently a Scientist in Residence and Adjunct Faculty Member at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies's James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS), in Monterey, California. In addition he is a Senior Technical Fellow in the Monterey Cyber Security Institute (MCySec). He teaches courses and workshops in nuclear trafficking, nuclear forensics, cyber security, drones and surveillance, and various other legal and technical topics.

INTD 1165 Maritime Archaeology: Exploring the Sunken Past
This course will be an introduction to the field of Maritime Archaeology. The topic includes different kinds of maritime archaeological source material, such as ships and harbors and other remains from seafaring, but also lake dwellings, submerged landscapes, fishing traps, and aspects of inland water use. We will also examine issues related to diving and techniques used in underwater archaeology. The role interpretation plays in all archaeological studies, maritime or not, will be a focus throughout the course. A central question guiding students’ inquiry will also be whether living by water has special implications for a society’s social and cultural development. No prior diving experience necessary. SCI (J. Rönnby)

Dr. Johan Rönnby is professor of maritime archaeology at Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden. He has more than 30 years of experience in diving and underwater research, mostly in the cold and black water of the Baltic Sea. He has published numerous books and academic papers.   

INTD 1166 Translation Workshop in Vermont, Tokyo, and California
Students with advanced fluency in the languages of German, French, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, or Italian will be trained to translate from English into their language of specialization.  After a week of orientation, students will travel to Japan (expenses paid) and spend a week working with counterparts from MIIS in translating promotional materials for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics from English into their respective languages.  Final polishing of translations will be done during the balance of the term, one week in Monterey and one week in Vermont.  Students will gain knowledge of basic theories and principles of translation and substantial practical experience.  Students will be admitted by application only, and will be expected to have strong linguistic skills in the language they will translate. (Approval required; Pass/Fail) (S. Snyder)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (P. Zupan, F. Sarti)

ITAL 1003 Time Around the Table: A Culinary History of Italy
In this course food will be our guide in the exploration of Italian history and culture. The choices that a nation, in our case Italy, made and makes about issues surrounding food tell us about identity, be it social, national, regional, ethnic, or religious. We will examine a number of questions: What do we mean when we talk about Italian food? What did one eat in Ancient Rome or during the Renaissance? And what about today? What are the historical events that have shaped what we have in mind when we say “Italian food”? And what about “Italian-American” food?  (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1344). EUR, HIS (I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (D. Humphrey, K. Davis, M. Arakaki)

Latin

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I
The course offers an intensive introduction to the Latin language that prepares students to read the major authors of ancient Roman literature. In addition to their systematic study of grammar and syntax, students translate excerpts from Vergil, Seneca and the Vulgate Bible. This course is designed for students who have had no previous experience with Latin, as well as those who have had some Latin but want to review the fundamentals of grammar. LNG (R. Ganiban, K. Huemoeller, a visiting winter term instructor)

Katharine Huemoeller, '07, is a Ph.D. Candidate in Classics at Princeton University.

Linguistics

LNGT/EDST 0205 Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and Educational Technology
In this course we will study the relationship between second language acquisition (SLA) theory, foreign language (FL) instruction, and the use of educational technology. We will examine various aspects of first and second language learning/acquisition. SLA theories and research findings will then provide a framework to explore FL instruction and computer assisted learning (CALL) applications. Based on an experiential project development approach, this course will offer students opportunities to critically assess existing CALL applications and to design learning materials based on SLA current and relevant research. Class sessions are designed to be hands-on and interactive.  (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1004) (A. Germain-Rutherford)

LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor. (K. Hanta)

Karin Hanta is the Director of Chellis House at Middlebury College, and has an ABD in translation studies.

LNGT 1002 Contact Languages and the Slave Trade
In this course we will look at the languages that arose out of contact between Africans and Europeans during the slave trade. We will begin with an overview of the history of the slave trade and resultant population movements. Students will study the differences between pidgins and creoles, the various theories for how these languages emerge from their source languages, and how the genesis of contact languages differentiates them from languages with more gradual genealogy and development. We will discuss the idea of “simplicity” as a loaded linguistic and cultural term, and possible connections between African languages and African American Vernacular English. This course counts as an elective towards the Linguistics minor. AAL, CMP, SOC (T. Cook, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Toni Cook is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa, with a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Literary Studies

LITS/ENAM 1022 Kafka and his Influence
This course is an intensive inquiry into the work and reach of Franz Kafka.  In addition to reading his novels, his stories, his letters and diaries, and his aphorisms, we will take up some of the voluminous and often highly imaginative writings on Kafka, with an eye towards fashioning some ideas, and some writings, of our own. (This course is a junior/senior seminar for ENAM majors; others by instructor approval)  EUR, LIT, PHL (R. Cohen)

Mathematics

MATH/PHIL 1015 Philosophy of Mathematics
Mathematics is one of humankind’s greatest cognitive endeavors, yet it raises many puzzling questions. Unlike much of our other knowledge, most mathematical knowledge is not established by gathering empirical evidence. So how is mathematical knowledge possible? Unlike most other things we consider to be real, mathematical objects are not physical objects. So in what sense do mathematical objects, such as numbers, exist? What are the foundations of mathematics? Do some mathematical proofs provide greater understanding than others? No prior knowledge of mathematics or philosophy is required. DED, PHL (S. Abbott, K. Khalifa)

Music

MUSC 0235 Music Ethnography
In this course we will study various methods and techniques for conducting field research about musical phenomena. Students will learn how to design feasible research projects, document musical activities in human communities, analyze collected data, and present their findings. Class and out-of-class activities will include writing ethnographic notes, making audio/video recordings, conducting interviews, photography, writing research reports, and making oral presentations. Students may have the opportunity to do field research that will involve field equipment and editing software. Some background in reading or writing about music is recommended. ART, SOC (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (C. Christensen Evancho; D. Anderson, E. Plasson, visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson (director) and Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 10th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Les Misérables (2014).  The will be joined for the first time by conductor Emmanuel Plasson, music director for the Opera Company of Middlebury.

MUSC 1024 Making Music with Tablets and Smartphones
In this course students will compose and perform music using only tablets and smartphones as musical instruments. Students will form groups, compose and improvise, and develop performances. Through student research projects, we will study what musicians and researchers are doing with this new medium. No musical experience is required other than a love of music, an open mind, and a willingness to experiment and explore. All students must have access to an Android or iOS smartphone or tablet throughout the month) ART (P. Hamlin; M. Childs, a visiting winter term instructor)

Philosophy

PHIL/MATH 1015 Philosophy of Mathematics
Mathematics is one of humankind’s greatest cognitive endeavors, yet it raises many puzzling questions. Unlike much of our other knowledge, most mathematical knowledge is not established by gathering empirical evidence. So how is mathematical knowledge possible? Unlike most other things we consider to be real, mathematical objects are not physical objects. So in what sense do mathematical objects, such as numbers, exist? What are the foundations of mathematics? Do some mathematical proofs provide greater understanding than others? No prior knowledge of mathematics or philosophy is required. DED, PHL (S. Abbott, K. Khalifa)

Physics

PHYS 0220 Introduction to Mathematica
Mathematica
is a scientific software application that consists of a flexible high-level programming language with thousands of powerful built-in functions for symbolic, numeric, and graphical computation typical of physics and other quantitative fields.  Undergraduates can use Mathematica for coursework, senior projects, and throughout their professional careers.  In this course we will focus on the principles at the core of Mathematica and how these principles unify such a great range of computational capabilities. (PHYS 0109 and 0110; Recommended: MATH 0200 and a traditional “computer programming course” in high school or college) DED, SCI (J. Dunham)

PHYS 1105 Ancient Astronomy
In this course we will learn about astronomy through the lens of ancient civilizations. By studying the civilizations of the Babylonians, Mayans, and Greeks, we will learn how ancient astronomers determined the sizes of the Earth and Moon as well as distances to bodies in the solar system. We will employ hands-on, lab-like observations and minimum use of mathematics to learn how our ancestors understood our place in the cosmos. CMP, SCI (E. Glikman)

Political Science

PSCI 0288 Love and Friendship in Literature and Philosophy
Love and friendship are important topics for understanding the best human life and its relationship to the best regime. We will study Plato’s Phaedrus and Symposium; Aristotle’s Ethics; essays on friendship by Montagne and Bacon; Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and another play; Rousseau’s Emile; a Jane Austen novel, and Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. We will also watch two movies: The Philadelphia Story and Anna Karenina. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1030) (Political Theory) EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Dry)

PSCI 1003 Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we will examine the history, current condition and prospective future of US-European relations, focusing primarily on transatlantic security aspects but with reference to political and economic contexts and bilateral ties.  The learning process will include lectures, class discussions, guest speakers, a role-playing exercise, and a final policy options paper.  Issues covered include: persistent and changing aspects of  the “transatlantic bargain;” the Ukraine crisis and relations with Russia; NATO enlargement issues; impact of 9/11 and the Iraq crisis; NATO’s role in Afghanistan; US-European relations under the Obama administration; relations between NATO, the European Union and the UN; alternative futures for transatlantic relations. (This course counts as an elective towards the major in Political Science). (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, EUR, SOC (S. Sloan, a visiting winter term instructor)

Stan Sloan, a former senior U.S. government intelligence, foreign and defense policy expert, and research manager is one of America’s top experts on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs,  and books, including Permanent Alliance? NATO and the Transatlantic Bargain from Truman to Obama (Continuum Books, 2010).

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (J. Douglas)

PSCI 1040 From One World War to Another: Diplomacy, War, and Social Change, 1918-1948
Traumatic events create great changes. No event in the 20th century was more traumatic than World War II.  In this course we will consider the diplomacy that led to the war, determined the conduct of the war, and shaped post-war politics.  We will examine what it was like to be engaged in the war on the battlefield and on the home front.  Then we will consider the war's effects on future wars, on international law, and on society, including gender and racial relations.  We will employ a variety of sources: readings in history and politics, memoirs, poetry, feature films, and documentary videos. (Political Science) HIS (R. Leng)

Russell Leng, '60, is the James Jermain Emeritus Professor of International Law and Political Economy at Middlebury College.

PSCI/INTD 1153 Writing the Tunisian Constitution: Process and Problematics
In this course students will investigate the process of drafting Tunisia’s new constitution from the ground up.  Using transcripts of constitutional committee meetings and materials drawn from traditional media sources and social media, students will examine how the final draft language emerged from consensus-based decisions on three social and political topics: the distribution of political power, the role of religion in the state, and the equality of citizens’ rights.  Students will investigate which topics have been left out of the constitution, and why.  Alongside an intimate look at the partisan and personal factors that influenced debate on these topics in Tunisia, students will engage in comparative analysis of the Tunisian constitution of other recently composed constitutions. This course counts as elective credit toward the Political Science major. AAL, SOC (M. M’barek, a visiting winter term instructor)

Mabrouka M’barek was elected to the Tunisian Constituent Assembly in 2011 to represent Tunisians living in electoral circumscription of “the Americas and the rest of Europe” (all but France, Germany and Italy).  She has brought her professional background in auditing and transparency to bear in her constitutional and legislative work for the Constituent Assembly, including the authorship of a law to audit Tunisia’s debts.

Portuguese

PGSE 0102 Intensive Beginning Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0101 and a pre-requisite for PGSE 0103. (PGSE 0101) LNG (M. Higa)

Psychology

PSYC 1003 Children and Families Living with Illness: Psychological, Spiritual, and Cultural Perspectives
Over the course of a lifetime, most people are confronted with their own illness or the illness of a loved one. How do children and families cope with illness? How do they make meaning of their experiences? How do their spiritual and cultural beliefs impact their care and their views on healing?  We will examine developmental, psychological, cultural and spiritual issues confronting children and families living with acute, chronic, and life-threatening illnesses. We will explore the psychological and spiritual interventions provided to children & families. Writings, artwork and videotaped interviews will be used to illustrate varied perspectives on illness and healing. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC (L. Basili, a visiting winter term instructor)

Laura Basili, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist whose therapeutic work focuses on how children and families make meaning of illness, suffering, and loss.  For ten years she worked at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

PSYC 1020 Moral Minds: The Psychology of Morality
We have all “taken one for the team,” stood loyally by friends, overcome desires to cheat, and helped others before ourselves. We have also all stretched the truth to make ourselves look better, treated others intolerantly, and given preferential treatment to a friend. What motivates us to act in these moral and immoral ways? Are these actions guided by emotion or by reason? Is there one moral mind or many moral minds?  What makes these actions “moral” in the first place? In this course, we will grapple with these issues by exploring moral psychology from developmental, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives. We will consider the biological bases of moral psychology, how we come to have a sense of right and wrong, and the role of culture in constituting our moral minds. We will apply theories and concepts in moral psychology to Supreme Court cases, while also becoming attuned to the subtle, often unnoticed patterning of moral psychology in our everyday lives. We will use a variety of formats to address these issues, including theoretical and empirical readings, student-led discussions, essays, small group projects, and oral presentations. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC (A. DiBianca Fasoli, a visiting winter term instructor)  

Allison DiBianca Fasoli, ’04, is a Visiting Research Scholar at Middlebury College. Her research interests lie at the intersection of developmental, cultural, and moral psychology. She earned her Ph.D. in Comparative Human Development from the University of Chicago, after receiving her BA in philosophy and psychology from Middlebury College.

Religion

RELI/INTD 0298 Privilege and Poverty: The Ethics of Economic Inequality
In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality.  Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality.  We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” PHL, SOC (J. Davis)

RELI 1029 Global Pentecostalism
In this course we will explore developments in contemporary Pentecostal and charismatic movements, rapidly growing forms of global Christianity that emphasize direct personal experience with God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit and “speaking in tongues.”  We will begin with an exploration of the central beliefs and practices in Pentecostalism, its modern origins in the Azuza Street Revival, and racial tensions among the early “classical denominations” of North America.  Then we will turn our attention to the global spread of Pentecostalism in the 20th century, examining its cultural and ethnic variations in South America, Africa, and China. Finally, we will consider how these diverse global movements and neo-charismatic mega churches (especially their use of the media and endorsement of prosperity theology) are re-shaping the face of traditional Christianity.  CMP, NOR, PHL (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI 1034 C. S. Lewis: His Life, Literature, and Religion
Perhaps no other writer in the last sixty years has had as much influence on English-speaking Christianity as C.S. Lewis. He was a literary polymath. In this course we will delve into Lewis’ fictional worlds, exploring the meaning and symbolism of his Chronicles of Narnia, Space Trilogy, Screwtape Letters, and mythical novel Till We Have Faces. We will also read selections from his nonfictional corpus, including Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, The Abolition of Man, and The Weight of Glory. Finally, we will contextualize these writings by examining Lewis’ life, times, and legacy. LIT, PHL (J. Gray, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jonathan Gray received his Ph.D. from Stanford University and has taught at Stanford, Virginia Theological Seminary, the University of Mississippi, Middlebury College, and the Pentecostal Bible College of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. His first book, Oaths and the English Reformation, was recently published by Cambridge University Press.

RELI 1035 Hinduism in Performance
We will explore the intersection of performativity and Hindu religiosity guided by the analytic categories of Indian aesthetic theory. We will delve into the poetic visions of Kālidāsa; the communal nature of theatrical festivals; the expressions of movement in possession and dance; the social cohesion of popular devotional songs; the divinely inspired singing of Tantric mystics; and the modern critique of Hindu orthodoxy in the films of Ray, Mehta, and Sen. By developing an enriched experiential knowledge of South Asian performance as part of Hindu religious life, we will enhance our own aesthetic appreciation and expressivity. AAL, ART, PHL (J. Pierce)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Portice, P. Alexieva, a visiting winter term instructor)

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN 1021 Latin American Migration & the American Dream
The United States is a nation of immigrants that enjoys the most unsustainable rates of consumption on the planet. In this course we will focus on migration streams from Latin America, the social forces that create them, and their contribution to the increasing diversity and inequality of U.S. society.  We will apply ethnographic research to debates over the southern borderlands, remittance economies in Mesoamérica and the Caribbean, low-wage labor markets in the U.S., and U.S. immigration policies. We will also compare Latin American immigration with other migration streams to Europe and the Mideast. (This course is not open to students who have taken FYSE 1287 or SOAN 0329).  AAL, CMP, SOC (D. Stoll)

SOAN 1027 Gossip, Rumor, and Lies
Small talk can have big consequences. Gossip devastates both high-schoolers and high-ranking government officials; rumors have led to revolutions. Bullying, conspiracy theories, and celebrity scandal are all part of U.S. discourse on gossip, rumor, and lies, and the popular consensus seems to be that talking about others is, well, wrong. But what if gossip is good for you? Why do we gossip anyway, and why do we enjoy it? In this course we will examine powerful speech too often dismissed as “low” or of little importance, conduct close methodical analysis of interaction, and consider macro ramifications of supposedly micro events. NOR, SOC (D. Jones, a visiting winter term instructor)

Deborah Jones, ’04.5, is an anthropologist interested in intersections and interdependencies of language and political economy.  She recently completed two years of fieldwork in Ukraine.

SOAN 1028 Global Population and Food Security
In 1927 there were two billion people on the planet. Today there are over seven billion of us, and one in eight suffers from chronic hunger. What are the implications of rapid population growth and ever-richer consumption habits for our food systems? How do we ensure food security for every person on Earth? In this course students will survey historical and current debates drawing from national and global policy that seeks to control population, to increase food production, or both. We will also consider current trends in international development programming that include climate change adaptation, U.S. Farm Bill implications, and overconsumption. SOC (R. Hamel, a visiting winter term instructor)

Reid Hamel, '03, directs research in food security and economic strengthening programs for Save the Children’s Department of Hunger and Livelihoods in Washington, DC. She is a Ph.D. Candidate in Demography at the University of California, Berkeley.

Spanish

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish                         
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (G. Gonzalez, M. Manrique-Gomez, L. Lesta) 

SPAN 1300 Almodóvar’s Films: Desire, Transgression, History
In this course we will analyze selected films by internationally acclaimed Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar (La ley del deseo, Todo sobre mi madre, Volver, etc.). After Francoism’s end, Spain refashioned itself to produce new subjectivities and meanings of Spanishness. Our analysis of these transformations will involve the interconnections of desire, transgression, and history. By examining filmic constructions of popular culture (music, melodrama, hispanidad), authorship (directors, the creative process, the film industry), gender performativity, and (post)national/global identities, we will understand how Almodóvar’s films demand, portray, and shape social change. Readings include history, criticism, and critical theory. This course is equivalent to a low 0300 course (SPAN 0220 or placement). ART, EUR, LNG (L. Castañeda)

SPAN 1351 Art and Memory in Latin America: The Argentine Case
In this course we will study Latin American art and its relationship to military dictatorships of the ’70s and ‘80s. The term memory—as a necessary subject and as an objective for many of the subsequent artistic practices—will be the main conceptual point to be developed throughout the course. We will work with texts, audio visual materials, and creative exercises of artistic production. We will pay special attention to Argentina, focusing on the Proceso de Reorganización Nacional (1976-1983) and its effects on contemporary art productions and on the cultural institutions of this country. (Two Spanish 0300 level classes or above, or by waiver) AAL, ART, LNG (K. Madonni, a visiting winter term instructor)

Karina Madonni teaches Masters and Doctorate courses on Contemporary Art at the Middlebury College Summer Spanish School.

Student Led

STLD 1007 Campus Microgrid Feasibility Study
Microgrids are emerging as a key part of the local movement. By shortening the connection between energy production and consumption, microgrids promote a decentralized approach to power distribution that is more efficient, more democratic, more renewable, more resilient to grid failures, and often more cost effective. In this course we will work in teams to assess the feasibility of creating a microgrid at Middlebury College with a focus on policy and financial modeling. This course will be hands on and horizontally structured, modeled after previous student efforts that brought the biomass plant, the solar array, and the carbon neutrality to campus. The application for this course is available at go/middgrid. (Approval required; Credit/No Credit) (I. Baker; advised by David Allen)  

Studio Art

ART 0159 Studio Art I: Drawing
This course is a complete and thorough basic drawing course. Mediums used will be pencil, charcoal, and ink, among others. Work will be done from observation and invention. Line, perspective, value, composition, and introduction to color will be discussed. Assignments will involve students with the formal and technical aspects of drawing and with the idea of drawing as an individual means of expression. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. This course is required of all art majors and minors.  ART (J. Kemp)

ART 1026 The Magic Eye: An Introduction to Digital Photography
In this hands-on course using digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras, Adobe software, and Epson printers, students will master the basics of photography, both in terms of technical skills and aesthetic strategies. Topics will include exposure, white balance, file formats, lens types, depth of field, motion blur, noise, file organization, digital development, photoshop basics, aesthetic strategies and introductory theories of photography. Weekly assignments accompanied by slide lectures and screenings on historical and contemporary artwork will explore the language of photography. A 35mm DSLR and a $100 fee for materials will be required. This course counts as an elective towards the major or minor in Studio Art. ART (G. Gatewood, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Gigi Gatewood, '03, an artist working in photography and video was recently awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Trinidad & Tobago. She is currently on faculty at International Center of Photography.

ART 1125 Introduction to Traditional Black & White Photography
Students will learn how to expose, develop, and to print black and white negative film in a wet darkroom. Contemporary and historical fine art approaches to the medium will be explored through assignments and slide lectures. Development of personal vision and expression will be emphasized. This is an intensive workshop style course. Functional 35mm film camera with full manual controls is required. Each student will be required to contribute $150 towards the cost of materials. This course counts as an elective towards the major or minor in Studio Art. ART (M. Mantell, a visiting winter term instructor)

May Mantell has an MFA in Studio Art from Stanford University and a BFA in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute. She has taught Photography and Studio Art courses at Stanford, The San Francisco Art Institute, UVM, & Middlebury College.

Theatre

THEA 1005 Closing Arguments:  The Courtroom on Stage
In this course we will examine the relationship between the courtroom and the theatre: what is it about the trial setting that makes it so intrinsically dramatic?  Starting with four great plays (Inherit the Wind, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, A Few Good Men, and Twelve Angry Men), we will chart components of a court case (opening arguments, presentation of evidence, examination and cross examination of witnesses, etc.), and assess the degree to which “performance” can contribute to a good prosecution or defense, focusing specifically on that ubiquitously dramatized legal aria, the closing argument. Additional source material will include court transcripts, Supreme Court opinions, films and excerpts of televised trials, as well as a selection of famous closing arguments.   ART, LIT (A. Draper)

THEA 1019 Scene Painting
This course will provide an introduction to scene painting techniques for the theatre. We will explore basic principles of scene painting by interpreting research images, paint elevations, and color models for translation into full-scale paint elevations.  We will practice traditional methods of surface texturing and compare styles for two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications.  Student will participate in class discussions and critiques, and develop their skills through painting projects. Each student will be required to purchase materials costing approximately $50. ART (M. Evancho)

THEA 1021 Oratory: A Speechmaking Studio
Our teachers will be great speeches wherever we find them: from Antiquity and the Elizabethan stage, to Hollywood, the Civil Rights Movement, and TEDTalks gone viral. We will explore various theories of oratory, and, like students of classical rhetoric, we will emulate masterworks in order to sharpen our own persuasive skills. As speakers, we will practice vocal and physical techniques used by performers, as well as their methods for analyzing text. During the course, students will write and deliver their own speeches, completing an immersion into speechmaking designed to help them communicate with precision, empathy, and personal conviction. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1355 or FYSE 1398) ART (D. Yeaton)

THEA 1022 Kennedy Center ACTF Preparation
In this course the designated instructor will work with all Theatre majors who have been selected to participate and compete in this year’s Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival/ New England Region.  The group may include actors, designers, playwrights, directors, and dramaturgs. This course will combine group sessions and individual coaching, and will cover areas such as choice of audition material, critical analysis of text, appropriate research for plays and characters, portfolio preparation, coaching of scenes and monologues, and oral presentation skills.  The instructor will prepare the students and accompany them to the festival during the last week of winter term. (Approval required) (C. Medeiros)

Writing Program

WRPR/AMST 0203 Media, Sports, & Identity    
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002) CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)

WRPR 1005 Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using James W. Pennebaker’s Opening Up and Louise de Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, short stories, essays, and books that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own healing narratives in a workshop setting. Assignments will include short in-class writing prompts, 3 essays, electronic journals, and a final portfolio of 15-20 pages of revised work. CW, LIT (J. Crystal, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jennifer Crystal, '00, focuses on writing to heal projects and on narrative medicine. She has written for local and national publications about her journey with chronic illness, and writes a syndicated column for lymedisease.org and tbdalliance.org. She earned her MFA at Emerson College.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

MIIS 8500B Team El Salvador – El Salvador*

MIIS 8500D Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) - Rwanda*

*These courses are already fully enrolled

*The deadline for applying for the courses available through Monterey, as advertised in an October email to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, was October 15.

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.