Winter Term 2016

Click HERE for CURRICULAR Information
Click HERE for REGISTRATION Information
Click HERE FOR "OPT-OUT" Information

WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
   Classics
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Interdepartmental
    Jewish Studies
    Linguistics
    Neuroscience
    Writing Program
    Student-Led Course

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German       Greek
   Hebrew
   Spanish & Portuguese
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Economics
  Education Studies
  Geography
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology/Anthropology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
   Comparative Lit

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Physics

 

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


American Studies

AMST/WRPR 0203 Media, Sports, & Identity    
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of individual identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Students will describe, define, explain, and discuss the general challenges to identity formation when confronted by major ideals communicated through mediated sports. Students will further identify and evaluate some of the cultural assumptions in writing about sports. CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)

AMST 1012 Hollywood’s West: The American West on Film
From its beginnings the Hollywood western has presented an imaginative geography, a powerful popular fantasy expressing deep truths, and perhaps still deeper desires about American identity.  Initially the western reasserted 19th century America’s optimistic vision of manifest destiny; ultimately, many westerns challenged that optimism, often explicitly presenting racial, sexual, and political tensions. Over time, westerns have been re-defined, re-invented and expanded, dismissed, re-discovered, and spoofed. Working with a broad range of films, including Stagecoach, High Noon, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Unforgiven, Lone Star, Blazing Saddles—and perhaps even Cowboys vs. Aliens—we will explore the ways in which westerns have both shaped and reflected the dominant social and political desires and anxieties of their respective eras. ART, NOR (D. Evans)

AMST 1014 The American Middle-Class Home, 1850-Today: The Domestic Interior
In this course we will study the visual and material culture of the American middle-class home, 1850 to today. In contrast to the prevailing interest in the high-end decorative arts and homes of the very wealthy, we will examine mass-produced decorations and home-made crafts. How have people constructed and communicated their identities via domestic interiors? How do toys mirror or shape our perceptions of home? From prints to posters, houseplants to aquariums, this course will consider the effects of technology and mechanical reproduction on the look of domesticity. We will also study the culture of at-home visual entertainments, from early “magic lanterns” and optical toys to the effects of televisions and computers on perception and social life.
ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST 1015 American Deaf Culture and History
In this course we will explore America’s “DEAF-WORLD” from the early 19th century through the present day. Creative, community-based, and scholarly readings, as well as memoirs, TV shows, films, and material objects will illustrate diverse traditions of “deaf,” including religious, biomedical, social-cultural, and empowered identity forms. Central themes will guide our work: language and communication, community and identity, cultural values and practices, education, artistic and popular representations, technology and bioethics, and activism. Through these themes we will learn about audism and ableism—foundational concepts in deaf studies—as they relate to other systems of power and privilege. Overlapping identities within deaf cultural worlds also will draw sustained attention. This course does not require knowledge of American Sign Language. NOR, SOC (S. Burch)

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (B. Khattab, R. Greeley)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well.  How do you randomize mice?  How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated?  If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer?  In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology.  We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results.  Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0235 Sexual Selection
Charles Darwin described sexual selection as the mode of selection that favors traits that enhance an individual’s reproductive success.  Sexual selection has shaped behavior, morphology, physiology, and cognition in many species.  We will read portions of Darwin’s The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex along with current journal articles representative of the major questions in the field.  Some of the topics discussed will include: mate choice, intrasexual competition, alternative mating strategies, sexual conflict, and the role of sexual selection in the evolution of the brain.  Students will lead discussions and write a final paper on sexual selection.  This course can be taken for Neuroscience and Biology major credit. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0280 Immunology
In this course we will explore the human immune system and how it works to protect the body from infection.  Students will be introduced to the cells and molecules of the immune system and how they work together to protect the host from foreign invaders.  We will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of innate immunity before exploring the cellular and genetic principles that underlie the adaptive immune response.  Finally, we will investigate how innate and adaptive immunity work together to combat infection and how disease can arise from inadequacies in this coordinated host response. (BIOL 0145) SCI (G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies.  Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period.  Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) SCI (K. Campen, a visiting winter term instructor)
Kelly Campen is a Post-Doctoral Fellow of Biology in the laboratory of Dr. Catherine Combelles at Middlebury College, where she pursues research on the ovary and factors that affect the development of female gametes.  Dr. Campen completed a Ph.D. in Biomedical Science with a focus in reproductive biology at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. 

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (H. Du, K. Wang, J. Chen, M. Cong)

Classics

CLAS 1001 Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War: History, Poetry, and Philosophy in Fifth-Century Athens
Athens and Sparta fought a fratricidal war during the last quarter of the fifth century B.C., and Thucydides’ account of it is our most important source for knowledge about Greece during that period. While Thucydides emphasizes his concern for facts, he admits he invented all of the speeches he attributes to historical persons in his narrative; he never calls himself an “historian” in our sense of the term.  He compares himself favorably to the poet Homer, while making a claim that is arguably philosophic: no one need write up any future human event, Thucydides says, because his account of the Peloponnesian War reveals what will happen everywhere and always, as long as human nature remains the same.  Through a close reading of Thucydides’ text, we will examine the interrelation of history, poetry, and philosophy in the ancient Greek setting in which these disciplines first came to be distinguished in the West. EUR, HIS, PHL (M. Witkin)

Comparative Literature

CMLT/ITAL 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT (S. Carletti)

CMLT 1002 Literature and Liberation
When Abraham Lincoln finally met Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of the best-selling novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), he is reported to have said: “So, this is the little lady that started the Civil War.” Published only one decade later, but a whole world away, Nikolai Chernyshevsky’s controversial novel What is to be Done? (1863) has been described as the single work that “supplied the emotional dynamic that eventually went to make the Russian Revolution.” In this course we will focus on these two novels that exerted an immense impact on society, had a powerful effect on human lives, and demonstrate the power to make history. LIT (M. Katz)

CMLT/ENAM 1027 England’s Ovid: The Font of Myths (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will read Ovid’s Latin compendium of mythical stories, the Metamorphoses, in the same version that Shakespeare and so many other English poets read: the 16th-century poetic translation by Arthur Golding, which Ezra Pound called “the most beautiful book in the English language.” We will discuss and critique the myths themselves (with an emphasis on oral storytelling) and occasionally explore how some of them reemerge in other English literature. In order to appreciate the particular qualities of Golding’s translation, we will read it alongside George Sandys’s elaborately engraved 1623 translation (a rare first edition of which is owned by Middlebury College), and compare both to one or two recent literal translations. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

CMLT/RELI 1038 The Arabian Nights—Storytelling, Orientalism, and Islamic Culture
In this course we will study the great medieval classic The Arabian Nights or The Thousand and One Nights Entertainment. Compiled in Egypt and Syria in the 14th century and translated into French and other European languages in the 17th and 18th centuries, this “ocean story” has had a profound effect on the development of the literatures of both the Middle East and the West. The incorporation of ‘Arabian Nights’ motifs in European art and orientalist discourse will be central in our enquiry. AAL, CMP, LIT (S. Goldman)

Computer Science

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

Dance

DANC 0240 Writing the Body
In this course we will examine the dialogue between the language of the performing body and the written word. Our goals will be to enhance our understanding of the human body through technical practice, experiential anatomy, and ways of writing that respond to and deconstruct the experience of embodiment. Daily technique classes, readings, writings, and performance assignments will encourage a synthesis of personal embodied experience and the words that express that experience. Personal essays, poetry, and several compositional works will culminate in a final performance of works created during the term. ART, CW, PE (S. Hardwig)

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can expect daily rehearsals plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (T. Kassabova)

DANC/SOAN 1025 Radical Humanity: Performance and Social Activism
In this course we will cover the history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism; we will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will range from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art-making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class. ART (T. Rhynard, a visiting winter term instructor)
Tiffany Rhynard is a filmmaker, choreographer, and activist. Having created over 60 works for stage and screen, Rhynard’s choreography has been presented nationwide and internationally in Europe. Rhynard is an independent filmmaker focused on social justice documentaries and dance for camera films.

Economics

ECON 1023 Extending Financial Services to the Unbanked
In this course we will explore different interventions and tools used for poverty alleviation, financial inclusion, and the extension of financial services to the unbanked poor in emerging markets. We will look at the use of microfinance, microinsurance, financial literacy, and the rising use of technology including cell phone payment services to achieve these goals in developing countries. Guest speakers will discuss case studies and themes from the course. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Economics and towards the major in IPEC) SOC (E. Toder, a visiting winter term instructor)
Elizabeth Toder, '90, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand 20 years ago, and since then has lived in Brasil, Argentina, Jordan, Haiti, and Vietnam developing microfinance and microinsurance programs. She has consulted on issues of financial inclusion for Build Change and the Slow Money movement and currently works on financing for water projects for Water.Org

Education Studies

EDST/LNGT 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field, such as linguistic prejudice, language maintenance, and social justice pedagogy. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. Opportunities for community engagement are also available. The final project is a portfolio that includes a personal philosophy of teaching. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003) (S. Shapiro)

EDST 0317 Children and the Arts
This course will examine the integration of the arts into the elementary curriculum. Students will teach standards-based lessons that include the literary, performing, and visual arts. Activities will include art projects, sketch journals, reading assignments, and the exploration of community and teaching resources. Students will gain an understanding of the important role the arts can play in the curriculum through field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week) and class discussions. (Pass/Fail) ART (T. Weston)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (C. Cooper)

EDST 0337 The Urban Education Internship
This internship provides teaching and learning opportunities in schools in Washington, D.C. During the term, each student will be assigned to work as an intern with a classroom teacher or program at a school in our nation's capital. Tasks will vary but may include: observing classes, tutoring, directing small-group work, working with special education students, working in the computer lab, and working with outreach programs. Students will spend four full days (M-Th) at the school each week, keep a journal, and complete a formal essay about their experience. On Fridays, students will engage in an extensive reflective seminar and work with staff in our Middlebury College, Washington, D.C. office. Lodging and a lunch stipend are provided. (EDST 0115 or SOAN 0215; Approval required, please contact Jonathan Miller-Lane or Trish Dougherty prior to registration). (Pass/Fail) (F. Haque, a visiting winter term instructor)
As the Director of Middlebury in DC, Fariha Haque is responsible for the creation of a strongly branded presence for Middlebury in Washington, DC, with robust and durable links to the Middlebury and Monterey campuses and their programs.

EDST 1006 Contemplative Education: The Art and Science of Mindful Learning
Compelling research in the fields of education, psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science suggests a positive correlation between contemplative practices and the intellectual, emotional, and psychological growth of students.  In this course we will consider the art and science of mindful learning as we investigate the emerging field of contemplative education.  We will look at education and learning theories that inform contemplative pedagogies in K-12 and higher education.  We will also engage in contemplative practices and holistic inquiry to consider mindful learning from a personal perspective.  Students will develop their own curricular models for contemplative teaching and learning. (M. Hammerle, a visiting winter term instructor)
Melissa Hammerle, Ed.D., has recently completed a research study entitled Conceptualizing Contemplative Practice as Pedagogy: Approaches to Mindful Inquiry in Higher Education. She has also served as the Director of the N.Y.U. Creative Writing Program.

English and American Literatures

ENAM 1003 Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as the first “modern” novel and as one of the best novels ever written.  First published in serial form in France in 1856, this story of a deeply dissatisfied provincial wife provoked a sensation, culminating in a spectacular state trial of author and publisher on charges of public immorality.  Those events have long since faded into history, but the novel’s freshness, brilliance, psychological power, and literary influence can be felt to this day. In this course we will read the novel in two English translations, briefly review its historical and cultural context and its enduring literary heritage, and conclude with its most recent film adaptation, by Claude Chabrol (1991). LIT (D. Price)

ENAM 1026 Literary Autobiography and the Art of Self-Representation
Does autobiography reflect or construct identity?  Is autobiography obliged to tell the truth?  What formal structures and literary devices have writers used to represent themselves?  In this course we will explore the art of self-representation.  Along our path of inquiry we will encounter the regrets of St. Augustine, the wild extravagances of the sculptor Cellini, the "floating life" of Shen Fu, the moving narrative of Frederick Douglass, and Maggie Nelson's lyrical and experimental Bluets.  In addition to writing short literary analyses of the readings, students will author their own autobiographical essay and critique it. This course counts as elective credit toward the ENAM major. LIT (V. Valcik, a visiting winter term instructor)
Victor Valcik holds an MFA in Fiction from Warren Wilson College and has worked as an urban public high school teacher, and in the financial industry.

ENAM 1028 Literature and the Ecology of Resistance
We will begin by exploring environmental literature from the Global South. How does this genre of writing and thinking differ from first-world environmentalism? In what ways has ecology become the basis for political movements in those parts of the world that are still affected by the ongoing legacy of colonialism? We will focus in particular on the question of rebellion, resistance, and counter-insurgency, and ask, how do the conditions of the natural world effect both resistance movements and strategies of neocolonial control? Throughout, we will seek to put pressure on the question of “literature” itself, as we ask how writing has played a role in environmental politics from the twentieth century to the present day.  Each week, primary texts by writers such as Zakes Mda, Arundhati Roy, Karen Tae Yamashita, and Raja Shehadeh will be considered alongside selections from critical and theoretical works by Jane Bennett, Frantz Fanon, Ramachandra Guha, Joan Martinez-Alier, Rob Nixon, and Eyal Weitzman, among others. This course counts as elective credit toward the ENAM major. LIT (P. Abatiell, a visiting winter term instructor)
Patrick Abatiell, '07, is a PhD candidate in English at New York University. His research interests include postcolonial literature and theory, queer theory, and the politics of environmentalism in the Global South.

ENAM/CMLT 1027 England’s Ovid: The Font of Myths (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will read Ovid’s Latin compendium of mythical stories, the Metamorphoses, in the same version that Shakespeare and so many other English poets read: the 16th-century poetic translation by Arthur Golding, which Ezra Pound called “the most beautiful book in the English language.” We will discuss and critique the myths themselves (with an emphasis on oral storytelling) and occasionally explore how some of them reemerge in other English literature. In order to appreciate the particular qualities of Golding’s translation, we will read it alongside George Sandys’s elaborately engraved 1623 translation (a rare first edition of which is owned by Middlebury College), and compare both to one or two recent literal translations. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. ART (K. Gottshall)

CRWR 0380 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 1002 Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this course will learn how to report, write, edit, and illustrate a variety of stories, including hard news, features, profiles, reviews, and op-eds. They will learn how to develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write fair and engaging articles on deadline. Students will follow the news daily, and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will discuss the key legal and ethical issues facing today’s journalists, as well as the impact of digital and social media on the news business. Towards the end of the term, we will convert our classroom into a newsroom and produce a publication for the j-term community. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (S. Greenberg, a visiting winter term instructor)
Susan Greenberg is a career journalist who spent 22 years at Newsweek magazine. Currently working as a freelance writer, she has taught Journalism and New Media Studies at Phillips Academy in Andover, MA.

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera--the tools of today's investigative journalists—students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105. LIT (P. Lourie, a visiting winter term instructor)
Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book for Henry Holt about Jack London in the Klondike.

Environmental Studies

ENVS 1028 Social Justice and Environmental Justice
In this course we will study contemporary environmental justice in the context of social justice movements that have preceded them, paying particular attention to how these earlier movements have influenced the challenges and tactics of environmental justice today.  Drawing on the work of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Dorothy Day, and others, we will explore the roles race, class, gender, and religion have played in confronting poverty, racism, and violence.  We will then go on to examine contemporary environmental justice movements, exploring how these movements are rooted in as well as distinct from social justice movements of earlier periods. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences.  NOR, PHL (R. Gould)

ENVS 1030 Changing Our Impact on the Ocean: An Interactive Deep Dive
We will explore, through geographic case studies, how humans impact the ocean, what happens scientifically as result of those impacts, and how local to international communities respond to them. Topics covered will rotate by week: 1) Nutrient pollution: the Gulf and Chesapeake Bay, 2) Ocean Acidification: Washington and Maine, 3) Ocean Temperature: the Caribbean and Alaska, and 4) the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.  Students will write short position papers, do projects in small groups, and make at least one presentation to the class related to the four main topics.  Each week we will have a mock “policymaking” session. Readings will include primary, gray, and popular literature. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors who have a focus in the natural sciences. (L. Jewett, a visiting winter term instructor)
Libby Jewett is the founding Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program and has first-hand experience with US government policy making processes focused on conservation of the marine environment.

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 1018 Cinematography
Cinematography is an advanced video production course with a focus on narrative film lighting, composition, and camera movement.  In this course we will produce 4-5 short video assignments, will complete a research presentation on a cinematographer, will learn lighting and camera movement techniques in a hands-on collaborative environment, and will attend lectures and screenings to develop a better understanding of the art and craft of Cinematography.  Each day we will spend the first hour performing increasingly technical lighting and camera setups, the second hour learning about new concepts in a traditional lecture setting, and the third hour screening films. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) ART (E. Murphy, a visiting winter term instructor)
Ethan Murphy is the Media Production Specialist in the Film and Media Culture Department.  Ethan has worked on television shows, independent films, live broadcasts, commercials, and music videos for PBS Frontline, MTV, and HGTV.  He recently completed The Camera and Visual Storytelling workshop with Steven Fierberg, ASC; The Camera Operator Workshop with Amy Vincent, ASC; and Tom Richmond, ASC at Maine Media Workshop + College.  His cinematography work has screened at the Vermont International Film Festival and the Green Mountain Film Festival.

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (D. Miranda Hardy)

FMMC 1021 Boxers and Boxing in American Cinema
In this course we will examine the representation of boxing and the boxer in American film, principally fiction film.  Popular images of “the fight” and “the fighter” will be investigated and special attention will be given to social conflicts including class, race, and gender expressed through these films. We will study the influence of literature, painting, sports culture, and the film industry upon the evolution of the boxer in American cinema.  The formal conventions and innovative practices that organize such representations and, in turn, affect audience response will also be investigated. ART, NOR (L. Grindon)

FMMC 1135 Script Development Workshop
In this course we will focus on the necessary preparation phase before the screenplay writing can begin. Participants will explore ideation techniques, finding a story that is appropriate for a feature length script, outlining and pitching. We will discuss dramatic structure in depth and explore the high-concept potential of your screenplay ideas, examining their aesthetic as well as their business possibilities. We will assemble a pitching packet for your projects, including synopsis, logline, mood board and fantasy casting. At the conclusion of this class, you will have a solid outline supported by pitching materials and a clear overview of your material. The class makes an excellent preparation for students who want to take FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II or who plan to write a screenplay for their senior tutorial. (FMMC 0106) ART (I. Uricaru)

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (B. Humbert, M. Garoiu)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS/LNGT 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor. Not open to students who have taken LNGT 1001. (K. Hanta, a visiting winter term instructor)
Karin Hanta is the Director of Chellis House at Middlebury College, and has an ABD in translation studies.

Geography

GEOG 0325 Cartographic Design
In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, wayfinding, thematic map design, realism, 3D rendering, and interactive maps. Laboratory exercises will provide opportunities for students to use graphics software and geographic information systems to implement concepts from lectures. Through a series of independent projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate spatial information to specialist and lay audiences. (Approval required) ART, SOC (J. Howarth)

GEOG 1007 Putting Business on the Map: Today’s Geospatial Industry
In this course we will explore the key practices, players, and products in the geospatial industry and the industries it serves. How are businesses using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to improve their processes today? What are the biggest hurdles in implementing geospatial solutions? Which companies and advances (i.e., cloud computing, big data analytics) are driving change in geospatial technologies? Through a series of interactive case studies, guest speakers, and field visits, we will examine how GIS is being deployed in the energy, retail, government, and agriculture industries.  Students will analyze how cost, technical scalability, accessibility, partnerships, and competition between industry leaders and emerging tech companies results in both innovation and—at times—stagnation across the industry. (GEOG 0120 or by approval) (C. Minton, a visiting winter term instructor; B. Hegman)
Chelsea Minton, ’08, is a geospatial professional who has worked in three technology startups. She has experience productizing, selling, marketing, and implementing a range of geospatial solutions across a breadth of industries including energy, oil and gas, government, and agriculture and environmental management.

GEOG/HARC 1021 Landscape: Photography and Geography
In this course we will examine the influence of concepts closely associated with geography—space, place, and landscape—on landscape photography. We will explore how these concepts are used in photography to analyze changes in the environment, such as the impact of climate change. Students will read and discuss geographical theory, examine and critique the work of landscape photographers, produce their own photos, write analytical papers, and view and critique films. The class will include a weekly lab and culminate in a public exhibition of student photos at a local venue. Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. ART (T. Case, a visiting winter term instructor)
Timothy Case, PhD, has applied his interests in scale, space, and place to his photographs of urban, rural, and industrial landscapes.

Geology

GEOL 1002 Mars: Geology, Evolution, and Exploration
Mars is an Earth-like planet that holds a fascination for scientists, space explorers, science fiction writers, movie makers and anyone with a curiosity about the universe. In this course, we will explore what we know about the geology and evolution of Mars from spacecraft missions. Volcanism, tectonics, existence of water, and possible presence of life are some topics that will be covered. We will follow the progress of Curiosity rover, as it slowly ascends Mt Sharp on the surface of Mars. We will also investigate plans for sending humans to Mars and building a base on the red planet. (R. Coish; C. Frankel, a visiting winter term instructor)
Charles Frankel, '79, has written several books on planetary geology and has participated in simulations of manned missions on Mars.

Greek

GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I
This course is a rapid and intensive introduction to classical Greek for beginners. The aim of the course is to prepare students to read the major authors of Greek literature. In addition to a systematic study of grammar and syntax, we will also read excerpts from a variety of ancient authors. LNG (J. Chaplin, J. Evans)

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning  German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (N. Eppelsheimer, R. Russi)

GRMN 1004 German Architecture and Power (in German)
Architecture reveals not only the aesthetic and formal preferences of the architect or client in charge, but grants insight into a society’s aspirations and power struggles. In this course we will study Berlin’s public buildings (and architectural proposals that never came to fruition) to understand the many complex forces that have shaped Germany’s old and new capital city. Recognizing that a building’s meaning changes over time depending on its cultural context, we will use semiotic models and historical background information to “read” a variety of iconic buildings as symbols for Germany’s identity formation processes. Examples to be scrutinized include the Brandenburg Gate, the various faces of the Reichstag, Hitler’s bombastic visions for the Welthauptstadt Germania, Stadtschloss/Palast der Republik, Şehitlik Mosque, Jewish Museum, and others. ART, EUR, LNG (F. Feiereisen) 

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Aloni) 

HEBM/SOAN 0251 Traveling in (and out of) the Holy Land: Israeli Tourism
Tourism is one of the most salient cultural phenomena in the post-World War II era and a main feature of modern life. In this course we will approach tourism from the Israeli perspective. Located at the juncture of Asia, Africa, and Europe and the birthplace of the three monotheistic religions, "The Holy Land", is an important site of pilgrimage and tourism. The diverse landscapes, pleasant weather, varied ethnic mosaic, Middle Eastern cuisine, and vibrant night life further contribute to the country's appeal. Yet Israel is also a hotspot of political disputes and the site of one of the longest standing conflicts of our era, scaring away many tourists, yet attracting others—interested in different kinds of "dark-tourism". Israelis themselves are big travelers, roaming the world individually and on tour-groups, carrying along their cultural traits and behavioral patterns. The lectures and readings for this course will outline the contemporary social theory of tourism and will analyze touristic practices in and of Israel and the Israelis. AAL, SOC (N. Avieli)

History

HIST 0352 Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
In this course we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Using an array of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will study the consumption of and attitudes toward specific foodstuffs, gauging the relevance of items like spices and coffee in the pre-modern period and of dishes like baklava within modern nationalist constructions. We will also investigate how Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have historically used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOC (F. Armanios)

History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design                   
This is a studio course that introduces its members to the values and methods used in architectural design and related disciplines.  A daily journal and intensive group and individual work within the studio space are requirements.  This course demands an exceptionally high commitment of time and energy. The course's goals are to use the process of design to gain insight regarding individual and community value systems, and to provide basic experience in the design professions.  It is recommended for anyone wishing to improve his or her appreciation for the built environment.  Students should anticipate that substantial additional time will be required in the studio in addition to the scheduled class time. ART (A. Nelson)

HARC 0301 Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field.  To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. ART (E. Sassin)

HARC 1010 Museum Studies: Exhibit Design
In this course we will explore the many aspects of the exhibit design process in a museum setting–from object care and interpretation through space analysis, display furniture design, graphics, and lighting. Utilizing digital images, readings, and discussions, the class will explore the history of exhibit design from Victorian curiosity rooms to current trends in interactive exhibits and designing for the disabled. Through hands-on exercises, model making, and electronic CAD and graphics programs, students will experiment with exhibit lighting, gallery layouts, and graphic design. Students will keep a daily design journal and as a final project, each student will present a formal design proposal of a particular museum installation.  This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. ART (K. Pohlman, a visiting winter term instructor)
Ken Pohlman is the exhibit designer for the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In over 28 years as a designer, he has designed more than a 150 installations. In addition to this course, Ken has also co-taught a course called Early Scientific Instruments: Exhibiting Artifacts from Middlebury’s First Century.

HARC 1019 Van Eyck to Bosch and Beyond: Early Netherlandish Painting and the Museum
An artistic revolution occurred in Northern Europe in the Early Modern Period (c. 1400-1550). In this course we will look at the innovations generated by such artists as Robert Campin, Jan Van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hans Memling, Gerard David, and Hieronymous Bosch. We will also explore the impact of the North on the Italian Renaissance, and the early history of collecting. The rediscovery of Early Netherlandish painting is linked to its presentation in museums around 1800. We will examine the interaction between these paintings’ presentation in museums and the reception and scholarship they generated.  This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. ART, EUR (T. Borchert, a visiting winter term instructor)
Till-Holger Borchert is the Director and Chief-Curator of the Groeningenmuseum in Bruges, Belgium. He holds degrees in music and art history from his native Germany and from Indiana University. He had curated seminal exhibitions on Jan Van Eyck, Hans Memling and published articles and catalogs on Northern Renaissance art and artists. 

HARC 1020 African Art in the Museum
In this course we will survey the arts of Africa through a close examination of the Middlebury College Museum of Art collection. We will learn how cultures from across the continent—Dogon, Yoruba, Benin, Ndebele, and others—use art objects to address questions such as: What makes a ruler? How do we solve problems? What does it mean to be in a community? Who is our neighbor? Our time will be divided into lecture, discussion, and museum research. Students will investigate the objects in the museum’s collection, the cultures they represent, and issues that surround African art in the museum. This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. AAL, ART (E. Searcy, a visiting winter term instructor)
Elizabeth Holland Searcy is a PhD candidate in the Art History department at UCLA. She specializes in African American and African art.

HARC/GEOG 1021 Landscape: Photography and Geography
In this course we will examine the influence of concepts closely associated with geography—space, place, and landscape—on landscape photography. We will explore how these concepts are used in photography to analyze changes in the environment, such as the impact of climate change. Students will read and discuss geographical theory, examine and critique the work of landscape photographers, produce their own photos, write analytical papers, and view and critique films. The class will include a weekly lab and culminate in a public exhibition of student photos at a local venue. Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. ART (T. Case, a visiting winter term instructor)
Timothy Case, PhD, has applied his interests in scale, space, and place to his photographs of urban, rural, and industrial landscapes.

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (A. Lynch, a visiting winter term instructor)
Alex Lynch has been teaching American Sign Language (ASL) and History of the Deaf Community at the University of Vermont since January 2011. Previously, he taught ASL at the University of Arizona.

INTD 1041 Persuasive Legal Writing
In this intensive reading and writing course, students will practice writing persuasive arguments while analyzing contemporary legal issues. Readings will include state and/or federal court opinions governing the selected issues.  Classroom discussion will focus on discussion of the readings and on the mechanics of clear and persuasive writing.  Students will work together extensively, editing and revising one another's work, both in and out of class. Students will write (and rewrite) three papers, each written from a different perspective (e.g., prosecutor, plaintiff, or defendant).  Students will also acquire a basic understanding of the way disputes are resolved within the U.S. legal system. CW (K. Kite, a visiting winter term instructor)
Kevin L. Kite received a M.A. degree in English Literature from the University of Colorado at Denver and a J.D. degree from New York University School of Law. He has served as Managing Editor of the New York University Law Review and clerked with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. He is a member of the Vermont Bar.

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2016
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, and impact-focused learning.  Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management.  Acceptance into MiddCORE 2016 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter.  Applications are due by 8:00 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 30th.  Decisions will be emailed by Sunday evening, Nov. 1st. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (J. Holmes, J. Isham)

INTD 1075 Debating Global Literature
In this course we will analyze literary texts in the context of current debates on globalization, world literature, colonial and postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, and gender studies. Readings will include Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Helon Habila’s Oil On Water, C. N. Adichie’s “Jumping Monkey Hill,” and Madeleine Thien’s Certainty, as well as theoretical readings from the fields of postcolonial studies, politics, history, development studies, and anthropology.  AAL, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Students will go from idea to company launch quickly and effectively through deliverables, class discussions, and hands-on mentoring both from professors and visiting entrepreneurs and investors.  Class will be focused on building a prototype, testing the market, and engaging with customers, so students should be prepared for significant hands-on work outside of class time.  At the conclusion of the course, students will compete with their classmates in a pitch competition. To enroll in the course, students must submit a business proposal (either for profit or not for profit idea) and meet in person with one of the instructors, prior to registration. In one paragraph, please explain: 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2) the proposed product or solution to solve this problem; and 3) why you are well-suited to tackle this project. Please submit proposals to MiddEnt@middlebury.edu (by Friday October 29th at the latest). If you do not have an idea but are interested in being a team member, please indicate your interests and relevant skill sets in an email to the same address.  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, A. Stickney, visiting winter term instructors)
Andrew Stickney and David Bradbury work at the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), an independent nonprofit technology business incubation program offering business mentoring, venture capital, office facilities, and substantive networking to the region’s entrepreneurs and emerging next generation employers. www.VermontTechnologies.com.

INTD 1102 Hospice and End-of-Life Care
In this course we will explore psychological, sociological, and cultural experiences involving death, learn about the modern hospice movement, palliative care, community services for patients, spirituality and dying, as well as after-death rituals and grief issues.  Guest presenters will include members of the local hospice team (nurses, social worker, chaplain, volunteer coordinator, local palliative care physicians), and specialists in bereavement and dementia.  We will examine variables that impact the end of life and ways to create a meaningful dying experience.  Each student will select a specific interest to explore in depth.  This course will include all the elements required to become a certified hospice volunteer for those wishing to work with hospice patients in the community. (Pass/Fail) SOC (P. Baker, a visiting winter term instructor)
Priscilla Baker is Program Director of Hospice Volunteer Services, a community organization that provides volunteer support to hospice patients, families, and caregivers; bereavement support to anyone who has experienced loss; and community education to promote a healthy understanding of death, dying, and loss. 

INTD 1118 Modern Media and Healthcare: Beyond Viagra and Scrubs
News, entertainment, commercials, TV, movies, on line and social modern media is the primary source of health information for consumers. Much is credible but there is also no shortage of contradictory and incorrect health content.  In this course we will examine various media forms and their influence on health perceptions, expectations, priorities, and beliefs. Using current examples we will flesh out how particular health issues break into public consciousness, change behaviors, and evolve and drive healthcare policy, as well as cite case histories where media spin led to unwarranted consumer hysteria.  The course will prompt analytic skills to comprehend "raw" medical studies to compare with popular media interpretations while at the other extreme will look at content including House, Scrubs, and even mens' and womens' health commercials and their contribution to the healthcare landscape. The term culminates in hands on multi-media project to prompt a consumer response to an emerging health issue or behavior. NOR, SOC (H. Torman, a visiting winter term instructor)
Howard Torman, M.D.  is a former national  medical correspondent and health editor for CBS News. He currently is a medical media consultant for healthcare.

INTD 1123 Communication and Connectedness: The Real and the Virtual
Computers and other digital technologies, rightly called “just tools,” do ingenious things, but are they changing our sense of humanity? For millennia face to face communication was our only means for connecting with each other, and though new technologies have facilitated varieties of change in how we communicate, none has impacted us the way e-devices have during the last decades. Two consequences of new digital technologies are; blurring boundaries between the virtual and real, and the creation of a new solitude. As we bring the distant close are we making the close distant? In this course we address questions and issues regarding: What gains and losses do we experience through our use of new technologies? Does electronic accessibility create or deter yearned for connection(s)? Does the altering of virtual and real boundaries impact inter-personal problem solving, the establishment of values and trust, intergenerational communication, the importance of family, the expression and experience of emotions, and do e-devices effect the way we define life? SOC (R. Marum, a visiting winter term instructor)
Roger Marum, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Middlebury, and a writer.

INTD 1131 Visual Data Analysis
“The greatest value of a picture is when it forces us to notice what we never expected to see” (John W. Tukey, American statistician). In this course we will focus on scientific data visualization, a powerful complement to statistical analysis.  Using datasets from various fields, as well as students' choice, we will learn principles for processing and visualizing data.  Throughout, we will use R, the premier programming language for data visualization and analysis.  No previous knowledge of programming is assumed, but by course's end students will write powerful scripts to analyze and present data in a clear and compelling way. (Pass/Fail) (M. Landis)

INTD 1144 Introduction to Literary Journalism
This course will introduce you to reading and writing literary journalism, which is, at essence, a genre of nonfiction writing that combines immersion reporting and storytelling.   Like newspaper reporting, literary journalism presents hard facts and credible research, but it also often uses a subjective narrative voice, one that expresses emotion and opinion. Each week, we’ll discuss literary journalism articles in order to understand and then practice the research techniques and aspect of craft that make them well written and resonant.  You’ll also write your own work of literary journalism on a subject you choose.  This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (J. Obuchowski, a visiting winter term instructor)
Janice Obuchowski has her BA in English from Cornell University and her MA in English from the University of Virginia.  She also received her MFA in fiction from the University of California, Irvine.  Currently she’s a fiction editor at the New England Review and serves on the admissions board for the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.  She’s been a lecturer at the University of Vermont and her work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Gettysburg Review, Slice, Seattle Review, and Passages North.

INTD 1148 Law and Disorder: Criminal Practice and Procedure in the 21st Century
This course will familiarize students with both the Vermont Criminal Justice system and the rules of criminal procedure within which attorneys must operate.  This course will further develop students’ ability to view, analyze, and present a criminal case to a jury.  What decisions go into the filing of criminal charges, who are the players, what are the rights of the defendant, and how is a case prepared and presented to jury?  These questions will be explored through both lecture and practical experience.  The course will culminate with students participating in a mock trial. (P. Bevere, a visiting winter term instructor)
Peter Bevere, '96, is the Deputy State’s Attorney in Rutland, Vermont, and has experience handling cases ranging from domestic and sexual assaults to murder. 

INTD 1154 Ways of Learning: Building the Traditional Japanese Boat
In this course we will build a traditional Japanese boat, using its construction as a backdrop to explore the cultural underpinnings of apprentice learning.  Traditional craft apprenticeships are still very much the norm in Japan, standing in stark contrast to Western notions of teaching and learning.  Exploring how apprenticeship reflects aspects of Buddhist training will shine a light on students’ accepted notions of learning.  Readings will cover the history, traditions, and technical aspects of Japanese boatbuilding with emphasis on the pedagogy of craft training. Prior woodworking experience is not necessary. Each student will be required to contribute $60 towards the cost of materials. AAL, ART (D. Brooks, a visiting winter term instructor)
Douglas Brook is a boatbuilder, writer, and researcher.  He has researched traditional Japanese boatbuilding since 1996, apprenticing with five boatbuilders from throughout Japan.  He has published three books, and his work has been honored by the Japanese Ministry of Culture.  He recently received the American Crafts Council’s 2014 Rare Craft Fellowship Award.

INTD 1164 Drones and Surveillance
We live in an era of satellite surveillance, video monitoring, and electronic surveillance and now the hot button topic of drones performing these tasks in addition to armed drones carrying out assassinations. In this seminar we will deal with the technical, policy, and legal issues involved in these subjects Privacy rights are often in conflict with the technical capabilities in these and other areas. Civil liberties are balanced against security interest, with or without the knowledge of the population. The course will provide the student with a working understanding of the issues involved in the current use of drones and overhead surveillance and will provide a look at the future uses and limitations, examining how civil liberties are and can be balanced against security interests. (G. Moore)
George Moore, Ph.D., is a Scientist-in-Residence at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. He is also a licensed attorney in California and Colorado.

INTD 1167 Making Better Decisions:  Concepts & Cases
In this course students will learn an empirically-grounded 7-step decision-making process, and a variety of research-based conceptual frameworks, for addressing challenging personal and professional decision-making dilemmas.  Students will then apply the process and conceptual frameworks to address detailed case studies describing personal or professional challenges faced by decision makers.  Specifically, students will identify (in writing) an appropriate research-based conceptual framework, identifying the key variables that need to be considered; having done so, they will recommend (in writing) a solution to the challenge, supporting their recommendation with evidence and reasoning.  The different approaches and recommended solutions will be discussed.  In the final week of the course, students will have a chance to write their own challenging case studies, and to have their challenges discussed by the class. (D. Smith, a visiting winter term instructor)
David K. Smith Jr., ’68, served in Peace Corps Sierra Leone and did his graduate work at Tuck School of Business and the University of Minnesota.  Smith served as a Fulbright Scholar in Nigeria and has done academic assignments in Nigeria, Argentina, France, Ghana, Japan, and Kenya; he has also published case studies involving personal and/or professional challenges faced by decisionmakers in most of those locations. Until December 2015 Smith served as Dean of the Faculty of Management & Social Sciences at Baze University in Abuja, Nigeria.   

INTD 1168 Frontier Market Investment
Investment and commercial opportunities in the “frontier” countries are immense. A large part of global growth is taking place in the frontier markets. However, investing in these markets is complex and rife with challenges. Most businesses are family owned and with poor governance. Challenges are cultural, structural, regulatory, and those of management bandwidth. There is the challenge of how to build the companies successfully, while keeping reputations intact in the areas of social and environmental compliances. And of course, the challenges of how to exit the investments at the appropriate price and through the appropriate suitor remain. In this course we will explore these opportunities and complexities with real life investment cases focusing especially on Bangladesh. (K. Quadir, a visiting winter term instructor)
Khalid Quadir, '90, is the managing partner of Frontier Fund which invests private equity in businesses in Bangladesh. Prior to that, he founded a few companies and worked in investment banking in New York City.

INTD 1169 Introduction to R for Social Science Research
In this course we will become familiar with the R computing environment, an open source statistical package commonly used in the social sciences. We will work with R’s tools for exploratory data analysis (focusing on graphics) and statistical analysis. Depending on student research interests, different analytic techniques will be emphasized. Spatial analytic techniques will be covered. Students will also learn best practices for using help files and online sources to trouble-shoot problems. Sessions will include lecture and lab. DED (A. Pantazis, a visiting winter term instructor)
Athena Pantazis is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University of Washington, focusing on demography and quantitative methods. Her research is in global fertility processes and health policy evaluation, and her teaching experience is focused on quantitative methods and the use of statistical analysis programs.

INTD 1170 Seed Matters: Exploring the Human Relationship to Agricultural Seed
In this course, we will examine how seeds are an integral part of human well-being. Diving into examples such as coffee, cotton, and corn, we will explore questions such as: How were plants domesticated and how do humans manipulate plants through plant breeding? How do intellectual property rights and international policies affect farmer sovereignty over seed? How has seed been a driver of economic and landscape change throughout human history? The class will feature hands-on activities and will culminate with a student project that further explores the human relationship to seeds as a source of food, fiber, and fuel. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors who have a focus in the natural sciences. (C. Luby, a visiting winter term instructor)
Claire Luby, '10, is a PhD candidate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Plant Breeding and Plant Genetics. She studies the effect of intellectual property rights on access to and sharing of plant genetic diversity.

INTD 1171 Wisdom in an Information Age: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives on Technology
In this course we will chart a path from Techné to Twitter as we consider philosophical and religious interpretations of technology. We will first ask—What is technology? Can it be defined? We will read accounts on the origins of technology in philosophy alongside stories of technology in myth and scripture. Next we will consider critiques of technology as articulated in the history of philosophy, ethics, and theology. Finally, we will reflect on the contemporary ubiquity of technology as it raises questions of nature and human nature, and the future thereof.  PHL (D. Cooperrider, a visiting winter term instructor)
Daniel Cooperrider is Pastor at the Weybridge Congregational Church (UCC) in Weybridge, VT. He has an A.B. from the University of Chicago and a Master of Divinity (M.Div) from the University of Chicago Divinity School.

INTD 1172 "Garden of the Empire:" History and Myth in Crimea
Russia's annexation of the Crimean Peninsula in 2014 precipitated the most severe geopolitical crisis of the early 21st century, and the effects are still reverberating in the news. This is not the first time, however, that Crimea has been the site of contention. By looking at history, literature, politics, and environmental studies, we will achieve greater understanding of the complexity of discourses—documentary and imaginary—that make up the fabric of Crimea. We will read selected poetry and fiction by Pushkin, Mickiewicz, Tolstoy, Twain, Chekhov, Tsvetaeva, Aksyonov, and Pelevin, and we will also engage with movies, photography, academic articles, as well as news reports. This course will count as an elective towards the Russian Major and the IGS/REES Major. EUR, HIS, LIT (D. Kenarov, a visiting winter term instructor)
Dimiter Kenarov, '03, is a freelance journalist and poet. He has covered the Balkans and the Black Sea region for a number of print and online publications, including Esquire, Foreign Policy, The International New York Times, The Nation, Outside, The Atlantic, and VQR.

INTD 1173 International Maternal and Child Health
In this course we will study Maternal and Child Health (MCH) using a multidisciplinary approach, which will provide perspective on determinants of health and the ways that various levels of society and culture influence the health of women and children around the world. Issues will include: human rights, water, nutrition, sexual/ reproductive health, childbirth, and infectious disease, as each relates to maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Students will utilize MCH indicators to describe MCH as a part of holistic global health, applying course concepts to illuminate the importance of MCH to socio-economic progress, sustainability, and ultimately, global development. This course will count as an elective towards the Global Health Minor. SOC (M. McLaughlin, a visiting winter term instructor)
Megan McLaughlin is a global health professional focusing on international, maternal, and child health with a strong focus on water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH); reproductive and sexual health, and preventable illness in children. She has worked in the non-profit and benefit corporation sectors supporting and completing projects in Uganda, Ghana, Haiti, and Honduras.

INTD 1174 African Cinema: Negotiating Post-Colonial Identities        
In this course we will study how African films from 1967 and beyond address the rapidly changing and conflicting cultural identities of post-colonial Africans. Through a combination of film and African Studies readings, paired with screenings of films from East, West, and South Africa, students will come to understand the impact of colonialism on African culture and will respond critically to how these changes are reflected in cinematic representations of post-colonial African lives. Assignments will include a screening journal, a research paper, and a group presentation. AAL (N. Ngaiza, a visiting winter term instructor)
Natasha Ngaiza is a filmmaker and scholar whose work investigates issues of black identity, displacement and exile, motherhood, and the intricacies of cultural heritage. Her works have been screened and recognized in over a dozen film festivals. Natasha holds a BA in Literary and Cultural Studies from The College of William & Mary and an MFA in Film and Media Arts from Temple University.

INTD 1175 Translation, Localization, and Project Management Workshop
In this course, native speakers or near-native speakers of modern languages who are interested in translation will complete a real-life, 2000-word translation for a non-profit organization or a humanitarian cause.  We will analyze key concepts in translation, localization, and project and terminology management, such as client types, glossary preparation, project scope, and translation/editing/proofreading. We will also explore key business concepts, such as quality assurance and quality control. Students will translate the deliverable text into their native languages and write a translator’s journal. Students will be paired with graduate student mentors from the Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation, and Language Education from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. This course will be taught via video conferencing from the Monterey campus. (Approval required, please contact the instructor at csilva@miis.edu) (C. Silva)
Cristina Silva is a translation instructor, translator, conference interpreter, and terminology and project manager. She coordinates the Portuguese Language Program at The Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation, and Language Education (GSTILE) in Monterey.

INTN 1052 Coaching and Issues in Sports
In this team-taught course we will examine coaching and its impact on students from elementary school  through the  college level. Students will develop a portfolio that will include coaching philosophy, sport psychology, physiology, and sport pedagogy. Each student will learn teaching techniques for his or her sport or sports of interest. Several guest speakers will lead discussions on current issues happening in the world of sports. Outside reading with response papers, in class participation, and a final portfolio will determine the grade. (Open to Juniors and Seniors only). (Athletic Faculty)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, F. Sarti)

ITAL/CMLT 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT (S. Carletti)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (C. Cavanaugh, M. Takahashi, M. Nashiro

Jewish Studies

JWST 1001 Social Movements in Modern Jewish Life
Over the last half century, social movements have challenged, shaken up, and transformed American Jewish life. In this course we will consider the influence of civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Soviet Jewry campaign, and struggles over Israel. More recent cases will include Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, and gender identity movements. Throughout, our focus will be on the reciprocal influence of political and religious movements, and on the changing character of American Jewish life. NOR, SOC (T. Sasson)

JWST/PHIL 1016 Hannah Arendt: The Politics of Philosophy
Hannah Arendt was one of the most dynamic and original thinkers of the twentieth century. She once described her philosophy as “thinking without banisters,” which meant engaging the ideas and events of her time without ideological preconditions. Topics of her work included the Holocaust and Israel, race theory and racism in America, nationalism, totalitarianism, and moral responsibility under dictatorship. Controversial but always innovative, her work provides an immediate gateway to the discussion of ethics, politics, and the purpose of philosophy. We will read selections from her Eichmann in Jerusalem, Responsibility and Judgement, Origins of Totalitarianism, and The Jewish Writings. We will also watch interviews and the feature film from director Margarethe von Trotte, Hannah Arendt (2012). PHL (E. Jacobson, a visiting winter term instructor)
Eric Jacobson, Ph.D., teaches philosophy and religion in the Department of Humanities at the University of Roehampton, London (UK).  He is the author of books on Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Hans Jonas, and one forthcoming on Hannah Arendt.

Linguistics

LNGT/EDST 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field, such as linguistic prejudice, language maintenance, and social justice pedagogy. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. Opportunities for community engagement are also available. The final project is a portfolio that includes a personal philosophy of teaching. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003) (S. Shapiro)

LNGT 0226 The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology
In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. SCI (A. Germain-Rutherford)

LNGT/GSFS 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor. Not open to students who have taken LNGT 1001. (K. Hanta, a visiting winter term instructor)
Karin Hanta is the Director of Chellis House at Middlebury College, and has an ABD in translation studies.

Music

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (C. Christensen; D. Anderson, T. Irwin, visiting winter term instructors)
Douglas Anderson (director) and Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 10th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Les Misérables (2014).  They will be joined by conductor Terence (Bear) Irwin, affiliate artist with the Middlebury College Music Department.

MUSC 1021 Sounds and Sweet Airs: Shakespeare and Music
Shakespeare's plays are the stories we tell ourselves to explain to ourselves who we are. We have told them over and over, and they have proven to be infinitely adaptable to our needs. Composers, too, have been drawn to them from the beginning, adding their music to the music of Shakespeare's language. In this course we will study a number of plays, among them Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and A Midsummer Night's Dream, and the operas, ballets, film scores, and symphonic works they have inspired from the 17th century to the present. (Not open to student who have taken FYSE 1132) ART, CW, EUR (G. Vitercik)

Neuroscience

NSCI/PSYC 1045 The Sleeping Brain
The average person will sleep approximately a third of his or her lifetime. What is the brain doing during this altered state of consciousness? In this course we will broadly explore the neuroscience of sleep, including anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, human disease, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, sleep deprivation, and dreaming. Sleep and cognition, and particularly the effects of sleep on memory, will be emphasized. Students will become skilled at critically reading peer-reviewed journal articles, and will participate in hands-on labs and demonstrations (i.e., collecting sleep data and polysomnography training). This course counts as a Psychology elective. SCI (K. Bennion, a visiting winter term instructor)
Kelly Bennion,’10, is in her final year of a Ph.D. program in Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston College, previously having obtained a Ed.M. in Mind, Brain, and Education from Harvard University. She has taught at Boston College and Emerson College, and her research, supported by a fellowship from the U.S. Department of Defense, focuses on the effects of sleep and stress on memory consolidation.

Philosophy

PHIL/JWST 1016 Hannah Arendt: The Politics of Philosophy
Hannah Arendt was one of the most dynamic and original thinkers of the twentieth century. She once described her philosophy as “thinking without banisters,” which meant engaging the ideas and events of her time without ideological preconditions. Topics of her work included the Holocaust and Israel, race theory and racism in America, nationalism, totalitarianism, and moral responsibility under dictatorship. Controversial but always innovative, her work provides an immediate gateway to the discussion of ethics, politics, and the purpose of philosophy. We will read selections from her Eichmann in Jerusalem, Responsibility and Judgement, Origins of Totalitarianism, and The Jewish Writings. We will also watch interviews and the feature film from director Margarethe von Trotte, Hannah Arendt (2012). PHL (E. Jacobson, a visiting winter term instructor)
Eric Jacobson, Ph.D., teaches philosophy and religion in the Department of Humanities at the University of Roehampton, London (UK).  He is the author of books on Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Hans Jonas, and one forthcoming on Hannah Arendt.

PHIL 1017 The Pragmatists and Environmental Pragmatism
William James and John Dewey approached philosophy as a practical necessity for interpreting, evaluating, criticizing, and redirecting culture.  In this course we will introduce their philosophies – along with the philosophies of Charles S. Peirce, Jane Addams, and George Herbert Mead – and explore their continuing relevance for current struggles, with an emphasis on environmental problems.  Our principal focus will be Dewey, the foremost representative of American pragmatism.  We will dedicate at least a full day each week to environmental pragmatism, a contemporary movement among philosophers who are struggling to think more perceptively, imaginatively, and effectively about environmental issues.  Course work will culminate in a philosophical analysis of a chosen environmental problem. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors who have a focus in the natural sciences. PHL (S. Fesmire, a visiting winter term instructor)
Steven Fesmire is Professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at Green Mountain College.  He is the author of Dewey (Routledge Press, 2015) and John Dewey and Moral Imagination:  Pragmatism in Ethics (Indiana University Press, 2003), and he is currently editing the Oxford Handbook of Dewey for Oxford University Press.

Physics

PHYS 0221 Electronics for Scientists
An introduction to modern electronic circuits and devices, emphasizing both physical operation and practical use. Transistors and integrated circuits are considered in both analog and digital applications. Examples and laboratory experiments stress measurement and control applications in the physical and biological sciences. Students will gain hands-on familiarity with the design, use, and troubleshooting of electronic instrumentation. (Approval required; PHYS 0110 or by waiver) DED, SCI (S. Watson)

Political Science

PSCI 1020 American Power: Soft, Hard, or Smart
The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Libya intervention and the conflicts in Syria have raised important questions about how the United States chooses to use its power on behalf of its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since World War II.  Based on selected case studies, we will examine pro and con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with extensive class debate and discussion. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CW, NOR, SOC (S. Sloan, a visiting winter term instructor)
Stan Sloan, a retired U.S. government foreign and defense policy specialist and research manager, and currently a Visiting Scholar in Political Science at Middlebury, lectures widely in Europe and the United States; and is author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, reports for Congress, and books including Defense of the West (Bloomsbury, forthcoming, 2016), Permanent Alliance? (Continuum, 2010), and The Use of U.S. Power, Implications for U.S. Interests (Georgetown University 2004).

PSCI 1023 What Can I Say? Free Speech v. Racist Speech in the United States and Europe
Students in this course will be introduced to the politics and law surrounding issues of racist speech in the United States and Europe.  We will look at the development of speech doctrines in the post-World War Two era, drawing on well known case studies from American constitutional history, as well as European examples such as the Danish Cartoon Controversy and Holocaust denial cases.  Through comparison across countries, we will debate the appropriate limits on racist speech in different contexts. (Comparative Politics) CMP, SOC (E. Bleich)

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that didn’t fare as well as we emerged from the Great Recession? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (J. Douglas, a visiting winter term instructor)
James Douglas, '72, successfully sought the office of Governor in 2002 and was inaugurated as the 80th Governor of Vermont in January, 2003. He was re-elected in 2004, 2006, and 2008.

PSCI 1042 Constitutional Rights of the Accused
In this course we will research developments in constitutional law, including issues involving the Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search and seizure, the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent, and the Sixth Amendment right to counsel.  Students will be paired in teams and presented with factual scenarios, requiring them to research constitutional issues and draft motions and memoranda.   Each student will present legal arguments in a courtroom before a panel of judges. (American Politics) SOC (W. Sessions, a visiting winter term instructor)
William Sessions, '69, practiced law in Vermont from until 1995, when he was confirmed to serve as a federal judge in the United States District Court in Vermont, a position he continues to hold.  He has also served as Chair of the United States Sentencing Commission, and currently chairs the Committee on Rules of Evidence for the Judicial Conference of the United States.

PSCI 1043 America, Vietnam, and the Sixties: Diplomacy, War, and Social Upheaval
In this course we will study American diplomacy, the Vietnam War, and social changes that occurred in the U.S. between 1954 and 1975.  The diplomacy section will focus on US-USSR and US-China relations, as well US-North Vietnamese negotiations.  We will examine the conduct of the war from both a strategic perspective and the experiences of fighting men.  The section on social change will examine the civil rights, anti-war, and women's liberation movements. We will employ a variety of tools to examine these topics, including works by historians and social scientists, memoirs, fiction, poetry, documentary and feature films, and music. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) NOR, SOC (R. Leng)
Russell Leng, '60, is the James Jermain Emeritus Professor of Political Economy and International Law at Middlebury College.

PSCI 1044 Political Psychology: The Hidden Dynamics of Political Behavior
Insights from social psychology, behavioral economics, cognitive science, and neuroscience are changing our understanding of how voters make political decisions. In this course we will explore major areas of research in political psychology, including the dynamics of political participation, ideology, and partisanship, as well as the influence of political campaigns and the media. Students will design their own experimental research to test fundamental theories about political behavior. We will run the experiments on consenting individuals using the Amazon MTURK platform.  Course readings will include cutting-edge research articles as well as selected readings from Niemi, Weisberg, and Kimball’s Controversies in Voting Behavior. (American Politics) SOC (S. Guenther, a visiting winter term instructor)
Scott Guenther, ’06, is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of California—San Diego. He served as a legislative aide in the U.S. Senate prior to beginning his doctoral research.

PSCI 1153 Tunisia and the Arab Spring
While Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring, is often considered the only hope, it is also the biggest exporter of Jihadists. Why?  What can we learn from Tunisia’s first post revolution transition that can best help us to evaluate the Arab Spring and understand the certain return of the old regime?  In this course students will investigate Tunisia’s post revolution transition of 2011-2014. Using academic articles, transcripts of constitutional committee meetings (should they become officially available to the public), and materials drawn from traditional media sources and social media, students will examine what makes the Tunisian transition unique. More specifically they will examine how the final draft language of the new constitution emerged from consensus-based decisions on three social and political topics: the distribution of political power, the role of religion in the state, and the equality of citizens’ rights.  What was the exact role of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, in this process?  Alongside an intimate look at the partisan and personal factors that influenced debate on these topics in Tunisia, students will learn about the transitional justice process, as well as related economic and security challenges, by engaging in comparative analysis of the Tunisian transition with other countries of the Arab Spring and beyond. (Comparative Politics) AAL, SOC (M. M’barek, a visiting winter term instructor)
Mabrouka M’barek was elected to the Tunisian Constituent Assembly in 2011 to represent Tunisians living in electoral circumscription of “the Americas and the rest of Europe” (all but France, Germany, and Italy).  She has brought her professional background in auditing and transparency to bear in her constitutional and legislative work for the Constituent Assembly, including the authorship of a law to audit Tunisia’s debts.

PSCI 1154 Crisis Diplomacy
So you want to be National Security Advisor? Crisis Diplomacy deploys the Council on Foreign Relations’ Model Diplomacy simulation suite to illuminate how American foreign policy gets made. We will together recreate the complex environment in which policymakers must operate, one that demands emotional intelligence, strategic vision, thoughtful analysis, and creative and concise arguments. Crisis scenarios will include Drones in Pakistan, Russia and NATO in the Baltics, and Humanitarian Intervention in South Sudan. Students will finish the course with a better understanding of the skills that are desirable for government careers in diplomacy and security. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) NOR (A. Stanger)

Psychology

PSYC/NSCI 1045 The Sleeping Brain
The average person will sleep approximately a third of his or her lifetime. What is the brain doing during this altered state of consciousness? In this course we will broadly explore the neuroscience of sleep, including anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, human disease, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, sleep deprivation, and dreaming. Sleep and cognition, and particularly the effects of sleep on memory, will be emphasized. Students will become skilled at critically reading peer-reviewed journal articles, and will participate in hands-on labs and demonstrations (i.e., collecting sleep data and polysomnography training). This course counts as a Psychology elective. SCI (K. Bennion, a visiting winter term instructor)
Kelly Bennion,’10, is in her final year of a Ph.D. program in Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston College, previously having obtained a Ed.M. in Mind, Brain, and Education from Harvard University. She has taught at Boston College and Emerson College, and her research, supported by a fellowship from the U.S. Department of Defense, focuses on the effects of sleep and stress on memory consolidation.

Religion

RELI 1023 Early Taoist Texts
In this course we will concentrate on the two great early Taoist (Daoist) texts, the Tao te ching (Daode jing) and the Chuang–tzu (Zhuangzi), both of which date from the Warring States period (475 -221 b.c.e.) of China and yet remain widely read and studied. We will read them closely, in multiple translations, and consider questions of authorship, audience, and philosophical and religious content. We will wrestle at length with these wonderful and difficult texts, with attention first to their original context and then to their reception and interpretation in later East Asian religion, philosophy, and literature. (This course is not open to students who have taken RELI 0227). AAL, PHL (E. Morrison)

RELI 1029 Global Pentecostalism
In this course we will explore developments in contemporary Pentecostal and charismatic movements, rapidly growing forms of global Christianity that emphasize direct personal experience with God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit and “speaking in tongues.”  We will begin with an exploration of the central beliefs and practices in Pentecostalism, its modern origins in the Azuza Street Revival, and racial tensions among the early “classical denominations” of North America.  Then we will turn our attention to the global spread of Pentecostalism in the 20th century, examining its cultural and ethnic variations in South America, Africa, and China. Finally, we will consider how these diverse global movements and neo-charismatic mega churches (especially their use of the media and endorsement of prosperity theology) are re-shaping the face of traditional Christianity. CMP, NOR, PHL (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI 1032 Islam in America
Islam has a long history in America.  However, beginning in the 1960s, large numbers of Muslims from across the globe began relocating to America after restrictive immigration laws eased.  Today, Islam is reportedly America’s fastest growing religion. In this course we will consider the faith and teachings of Islam, Islam in the African American community, immigrant Muslim communities in the United States,  issues of cultural and religious identity, Muslim women in America, and the ways that second generation Muslims are reshaping Islam in the American context.  Throughout the course, our focus will be on the making of an American Islam. CMP, HIS, NOR, PHL (A. Anzali)

RELI 1036 The Way of the Ascetics: The Making of the Self in Christian Monasticism
The practice of asceticism appeared in ancient Christianity as a movement striving for a deeper spiritual life and connection with the Divine. Men and women withdrew into the wilderness to become fully attuned to God, engaged more empathetically with their human communities and the natural environment, and served the poor and socially marginalized.  We shall examine how their new model of living challenged the traditional formations of identity and power through cultivating a watchful mind and deepening awareness.  We shall also consider its possible relevance for our postmodern world. Readings will include the Gospel of Thomas, Desert Wisdom anthologies such as "The Philokalia," and works of American mystic Thomas Merton and novelist Annie Dillard. CMP, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

RELI 1037 A Hell of a Class: An Exploration of the Afterlife
Is there life after death, and if so, what is it like? How could a loving God condemn people to hell? What are the social and personal implications of not believing in an afterlife?  In this course we will explore these questions by reading ancient texts from all the major world religions, classic depictions of heaven and hell such as Dante’s Divine Comedy and Lewis’ Great Divorce, modern accounts of near-death experiences such as neurosurgeon Eben Alexander’s Proof of Heaven, and analytical essays on how our views of the afterlife affect how we live out our lives in the present. This course will count as an elective towards the Religion major.  PHL (J. Gray, a visiting winter term instructor)
Jonathan Gray received his Ph.D. from Stanford University and has taught at Stanford, Virginia Theological Seminary, the University of Mississippi, Middlebury College, and the Pentecostal Bible College of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. His first book, Oaths and the English Reformation, was recently published by Cambridge University Press.

RELI/CMLT 1038 The Arabian Nights—Storytelling, Orientalism, and Islamic Culture
In this course we will study the great medieval classic The Arabian Nights or The Thousand and One Nights Entertainment. Compiled in Egypt and Syria in the 14th century and translated into French and other European languages in the 17th and 18th centuries, this “ocean story” has had a profound effect on the development of the literatures of both the Middle East and the West. The incorporation of ‘Arabian Nights’ motifs in European art and orientalist discourse will be central in our enquiry. AAL, CMP, LIT (S. Goldman)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Smorodinska; A. Mihaylovna Litovkina, a visiting winter term instructor)

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN/HEBM 0251 Traveling in (and out of) the Holy Land: Israeli Tourism
Tourism is one of the most salient cultural phenomena in the post-World War II era and a main feature of modern life. In this course we will approach tourism from the Israeli perspective. Located at the juncture of Asia, Africa, and Europe and the birthplace of the three monotheistic religions, "The Holy Land", is an important site of pilgrimage and tourism. The diverse landscapes, pleasant weather, varied ethnic mosaic, Middle Eastern cuisine, and vibrant night life further contribute to the country's appeal. Yet Israel is also a hotspot of political disputes and the site of one of the longest standing conflicts of our era, scaring away many tourists, yet attracting others—interested in different kinds of "dark-tourism". Israelis themselves are big travelers, roaming the world individually and on tour-groups, carrying along their cultural traits and behavioral patterns. The lectures and readings for this course will outline the contemporary social theory of tourism and will analyze touristic practices in and of Israel and the Israelis. AAL, SOC (N. Avieli)

SOAN/DANC 1025 Radical Humanity: Performance and Social Activism
In this course we will cover the history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism; we will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will range from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art-making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class. ART (T. Rhynard, a visiting winter term instructor)
Tiffany Rhynard is a filmmaker, choreographer, and activist. Having created over 60 works for stage and screen, Rhynard’s choreography has been presented nationwide and internationally in Europe. Rhynard is an independent filmmaker focused on social justice documentaries and dance for camera films.

SOAN 1030 Global Environmental Activism
In this course we will critically explore foundations of anti/postcolonial theories and environmental activism. We will use an interdisciplinary perspective to challenge global dominant concepts of the environment and agri-food systems and critically explore collective/individual responses. We will examine macro and micro level environmental realities connected to collective agency, social change, environmental activism, and individual implications in our everyday social relations in a transnational context. Throughout the course we will explore literature from different disciplines (such as sociology, environmental studies, anthropology, history, women’s studies, ethnic studies, and other interrelated disciplines), and cover different regions of the world. This course will count as an elective towards the SOAN major and as a cognate for ENVS majors who have a focus in the natural sciences. SOC (D. Thompson Bello)

SOAN 1070 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. (Anthropology) AAL, LNG (M. Sheridan)

Spanish & Portuguese

PGSE 0212 Let’s Talk! Speaking on the Lusophone World
In this course we will focus on the development of oral skills in Portuguese. Students will also be exposed to cultural content in Portuguese through which they will be introduced to the social and political trends in the Portuguese-speaking world. Course material will also include significant review of complex grammatical structures in order to better prepare students for continuing Portuguese studies. (PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210 or by waiver) LNG (D. Silva)

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish                                 
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (L. Garcia, R. Pareja, A. Fil) 

SPAN 1301 Hispanic Horror Cinema
In this course we will study horror films from Spain, Mexico, the United States, Argentina, and Cuba in order to understand how Hispanic filmmakers employ intertextual horror esthetics to create genre films. The films we will consider focus on zombies (Rec, Planet Terror, Juan of the Dead), vampires (Cronos, Vampires in Havana), ghosts (The Devil's Backbone, The Others), and misogynist stalkers (Thesis, Sleep Tight). We will discuss both the conservative and transgressive aspects of this emerging genre in transnational Hispanic cinema, focusing specifically on how these films reflect the evolving political and ideological dynamics of their respective national cultures. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students who have taken SPAN 1111. ART, LNG (E. Garcia)

Student Led

STLD 1008 History’s Great Debates
History is more than dates and dead guys. In this course we will tackle four major themes: personal liberties, economies, governments, and worldviews. In each class, we will address a particular sub-theme, e.g., (Un)Free Speech, The Rise of Technology, War & Conquest, Reason & Faith. To do so, we will study historically significant people, institutions, developments, ideas, and arguments from across the world and throughout time. Through analysis and discussion, we will strive to answer questions and discover lessons that are directly relevant to our lives today. (Credit/No Credit) (A. Hutchinson; advised by Bill Hart)

Studio Art

ART 0159 Studio Art I: Introduction to Drawing
This course is a complete and thorough basic drawing course. Mediums used will be pencil, charcoal, and ink, among others. Work will be done from observation and invention. Line, perspective, value, composition, and introduction to color will be discussed. Assignments will involve students with the formal and technical aspects of drawing and with the idea of drawing as an individual means of expression. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. This course is required of all art majors and minors. Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. ART (H. Wallner, R. White, visiting winter term instructors)
Heimo Wallner is a visual artist from Austria, his main focus is drawing, animation, and sculpture.
Roger White is a painter and writer. He has exhibited his work in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago, and his book The Contemporaries: Travels in the 21st-Century Art World was published this year by Bloomsbury.

ART 1027 Intaglio Printmaking for Bookmaking
In this intensive course we will focus on the art of making prints with the intention of binding them into artists’ books.  Students will learn traditional intaglio printmaking techniques by creating a series of works using methods such as hard ground and aquatint.  Several bindings for bookmaking will be covered including accordion, four hole, and long stitch/link stitch.  Other bindings, registration, and sequencing of imagery will also be covered.  Students will be encouraged to develop imagery that has a relationship to the binding as well as to their developing body of work. Each student will be required to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials. ART (A. Kralovic, a visiting winter term instructor)
Amanda Kralovic received a BA in Studio Art/Illustration from Central Connecticut State University and an MFA in Printmaking from University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  Her work has been exhibited in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York.

ART 1028 Introduction to Painting
This class will cover the technical and conceptual essentials of painting.  Students will learn basic painting skills from building stretcher bars, priming, composition, working with oil paint, and mixing colors. Beyond the basics, students will uncover painting’s specific capacity to underline the intersection of the “stuff of the world” and how we perceive it.  Moving through major movements of 20th century art, students will step into the perceptual and conceptual shoes of these moments and occupy them with their own individual expression.  Importance will be placed on class critiques, dialogue, and building a painting vocabulary. Each student will be required to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials. ART (R. W. Horn, a visiting winter term instructor)
Rebecca Watson Horn is an artist, living and working in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.F.A. from Cooper Union and an M.F.A. from Rutgers in painting. She has exhibited at Soloway, NY; Exit Art, NY; Cleopatras, NY; and David Lewis Gallery, NY.

ART 1029 Methods & Mysteries: The Science of Art
Throughout history, artists and scientists have pursued a common goal: to explore –and if possible, reveal—the mysteries of the universe. Twentieth century physicists, for instance, studied Picasso’s Cubist paintings to theorize on perspective. Conversely, the 21st century artists Fischli and Weiss employed physics in their chain reaction installation piece, “The Way Things Go.” Students will evaluate how science and art inform and inspire one another, as well as create original works that reflect the spirit of collaboration between the two disciplines. A 35mm DSLR camera with manual controls is required; a limited number of cameras are available for borrowing at the Davis Library. ART (G. Gatewood)

ART 1125 Vision and Process: Black & White Photography
Students will learn how to expose, develop, and to print black and white negative film in a wet darkroom. Contemporary and historical fine art approaches to the medium will be explored through slide lectures, museum visits, assignments, and personal work. This is an intensive workshop style course. Functional 35mm film camera with full manual controls is required. Each student will be required to contribute $150 towards the cost of materials. This course counts as an elective towards the major or minor in Studio Art. ART (M. Mantell, a visiting winter term instructor)
May Mantell has an MFA in Studio Art from Stanford University and a BFA in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute. She has taught Photography and Studio Art courses at Stanford, The San Francisco Art Institute, UVM, & Middlebury College.

Theatre

THEA 1021 Oratory: A Speechmaking Studio
Our teachers will be great speeches wherever we find them: from Antiquity and the Elizabethan stage, to Hollywood, the Civil Rights Movement, and TEDTalks gone viral. We will explore various theories of oratory, and, like students of classical rhetoric, we will emulate masterworks in order to sharpen our own persuasive skills. As speakers, we will practice vocal and physical techniques used by performers, as well as their methods for analyzing text. During the course, students will write and deliver their own speeches, completing an immersion into speechmaking designed to help them communicate with precision, empathy, and personal conviction. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1355 or FYSE 1398) ART (D. Yeaton)

THEA 1023 History of Western Dress: 1300-Present
In this course we will address the changing ways in which societies have clothed the human body since the phenomenon of fashion in Western dress began during the late Middle Ages. Slides, readings, and video clips will be used to examine the ways in which evolving styles of dress reflect the social and political values of a society. This course will count as an elective towards the Theatre Major. Not open to students who have taken THEA 0125. SOC (G. Ryer, a visiting winter term instructor)
Glenna Ryer is a costume designer based in New York City, where she designs for theater and film.  She holds an MFA from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in costume design and a BFA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art in drawing and painting.

THEA 1024 Playwrights’ Thoughts on their Plays
In this dramatic literature course, students will explore plays by four notable contemporary American playwrights, and will interact directly with the playwrights.  One playwright will be featured each week; the class will read two or three plays by that playwright, and may see videos of the plays if they are available. Students will have the opportunity to engage with each playwright in a one-hour Skype discussion about their plays.  The course will provide students with a unique window into the creative process. This course will count as an elective towards the Theatre Major.  LIT, NOR (N. Nesmith)

Writing Program

WRPR/AMST 0203 Media, Sports, & Identity    
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of individual identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Students will describe, define, explain, and discuss the general challenges to identity formation when confronted by major ideals communicated through mediated sports. Students will further identify and evaluate some of the cultural assumptions in writing about sports. CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)

WRPR 1005 Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using James W. Pennebaker’s Opening Up and Louise de Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, short stories, essays, and books that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own healing narratives in a workshop setting. Assignments will include short in-class writing prompts, 3 essays, electronic journals, and a final portfolio of 15-20 pages of revised work. CW, LIT (J. Crystal, a visiting winter term instructor)
Jennifer Crystal,'00, teaches various non-fiction courses and seminars at Grub Street Creative Writing Center in Boston, and is a weekly columnist for the Global Lyme Alliance. She specializes in writing to heal projects and narrative medicine, and has written for local and national publications about her journey with chronic illness. She is working on her second book. 

WRPR/INTD 1041 Persuasive Legal Writing
In this intensive reading and writing course, students will practice writing persuasive arguments while analyzing contemporary legal issues. Readings will include state and/or federal court opinions governing the selected issues.  Classroom discussion will focus on discussion of the readings and on the mechanics of clear and persuasive writing.  Students will work together extensively, editing and revising one another's work, both in and out of class. Students will write (and rewrite) three papers, each written from a different perspective (e.g., prosecutor, plaintiff, or defendant).  Students will also acquire a basic understanding of the way disputes are resolved within the U.S. legal system. CW (K. Kite, a visiting winter term instructor)
Kevin L. Kite received a M.A. degree in English Literature from the University of Colorado at Denver and a J.D. degree from New York University School of Law. He has served as Managing Editor of the New York University Law Review and clerked with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. He is a member of the Vermont Bar.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

MIIS 8500B Team El Salvador – El Salvador*

MIIS 8500D Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) - Rwanda*
MIIS 8500E Team Peru – Peru*

*These courses are already fully enrolled

*The deadline for applying for the courses available through Monterey, as advertised in an October email to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, was October 19.

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.