Middlebury

Winter Term Course Catalog 2014

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.

Waitlist For Visiting Instructor Courses: If you would like to be placed on a waitlist for a visiting instructor’s course after the course is full, please contact Janis Audet at jaudet@middlebury.edu. She will monitor this process until classes begin in January. Contact information for visiting instructors is not provided before classes begin in January, and visitors do not manage their course waitlist before arriving on campus.

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
  Classics/Classical Studies
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
   American Studies
   Environmental Studies
   Gender, Sexuality, &  
    Feminist S
tudies
   Interdepartmental

   Linguistics
   Neuroscience
   Writing Program
  

LANGUAGE Division
   Arabic        Italian
   Chinese      Japanese
   French       Portuguese
   German       Russian
   Greek         Spanish
   Hebrew      
 
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Economics
  Education Studies
 
Geography
 
Political Science
  Sociology/Anthropology

 

LITERATURE Division
  English/American Lits
   Comparative Lit


Student-Led Course

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Chemistry/Biochemistry
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Mathematics
   Physics

 

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute

Trinchera Ranch

Independent Projects & Senior Theses

  
  
  
  
 
 

   

Interdepartmental or Interdisciplinary Courses

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (A. Lynch, a visiting winter term instructor)

Alex Lynch has been teaching American Sign Language (ASL) and History of the Deaf Community at the University of Vermont since January 2011. Previously, he taught ASL at the University of Arizona.

INTD/THEA 1021 Oratory: A Speechmaking Studio
Our teachers will be great speeches wherever we find them: from Antiquity and the Elizabethan stage, to Hollywood, the Civil Rights Movement, and TEDTalks gone viral. We will explore various theories of oratory, and, like students of classical rhetoric, we will emulate masterworks in order to sharpen our own persuasive skills. As speakers, we will practice vocal and physical techniques used by performers, as well as their methods for analyzing text. During the course, students will write and deliver their own speeches, completing an immersion into speechmaking designed to help them communicate with precision, empathy, and personal conviction. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1355 or FYSE 1398) ART (D. Yeaton)

INTD 1041 Persuasive Legal Writing
In this intensive reading and writing course, students will practice writing persuasive arguments while analyzing contemporary legal issues. Readings will include state and/or federal court opinions governing the selected issues.  Classroom discussion will focus on discussion of the readings and on the mechanics of clear and persuasive writing.  Students will work together extensively, editing and revising one another's work, both in and out of class. Students will write (and rewrite) three papers, each written from a different perspective (e.g., prosecutor, plaintiff, or defendant).  Students will also acquire a basic understanding of the way disputes are resolved within the U.S. legal system. CW (K. Kite, a visiting winter term instructor)

Kevin L. Kite received a M.A. degree in English Literature from the University of Colorado at Denver and a J.D. degree from New York University School of Law. He has served as Managing Editor of the New York University Law Review and clerked with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. He is a member of the Vermont Bar.

INTD 1061 The Elements of Murder
In this course we will study a combination of history, chemistry, factual crime, and fictional crime surrounding the darker side of some of the elements. Mercury, arsenic, antimony, lead, thallium have notorious reputations for causing accidental death and as instruments of murder. Readings will include The Elements of Murder, by John Emsley; Beethoven's Hair: An Extraordinary Historical Odyssey and a Scientific Mystery Solved by Russell Martin; The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie, and Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers. We will spend some time in the lab investigating the properties of these elements. (One year high school chemistry) 8 hrs. lect./disc./lab (J. Larrabee)

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2014
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, impact-focused learning.  Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, conflict resolution, and crisis management.  Visit www.middcore.com to learn more. Acceptance into MiddCORE 2014 is by approval only. Please send an email to middcore@middlebury.edu by 5pm on Saturday, Nov. 2nd with the following information: Name, Class Year, Major, and a brief paragraph explaining why you want to be in MiddCORE.  Decisions will be emailed by Sunday evening, Nov 3rd. (Pass/Fail) (M. Fernandez, J. Holmes) 

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Many people have great ideas for new products or services, but few are willing and able to take the steps necessary to make these ideas a reality. Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Through lecture, class discussion, and hands-on mentoring, students will bring a project proposal from concept to launch quickly and effectively. Key concepts that will be taught include: opportunity analysis, financial planning, team building, and fundraising. Classwork will be supplemented with guest visits from notable entrepreneurs. To qualify for this class, each student must have a business idea—for profit or not for profit—for which they care passionately and are willing to commit the time and energy necessary to give the startup a real chance at success. Students must submit a project proposal describing in less than 500 words: 1). the problem or opportunity they will address; 2). the product or solution they propose to solve this problem; and 3). why they are well suited to tackle this project.  Please submit proposals to MiddEnt@middlebury.edu (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, A. Stickney, visiting winter term instructors)

Andrew Stickney and David Bradbury operate the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), an independent nonprofit technology business incubation program offering business mentoring, venture capital, office facilities, and substantive networking to the region’s entrepreneurs and emerging next generation employers.  www.VermontTechnologies.com

INTD 1091 Social Identity and Institutions of Higher Education
College campuses are unique environments that carry the capacity to forge dynamic contemporary change while also sustaining long-standing traditions and legacies. This course offers an opportunity for students to expand their understanding of intergroup relations operating within institutions of higher education, and to broaden their perspectives regarding many of the social influences guiding our daily interactions as members of a learning community. As the dean of Wonnacott Commons, and an alumnus, the instructor of this course has a particular insight and interest in leading the class to consider many of the social dynamics that influence and characterize the undergraduate experience in the new millennium. Course readings will cover social-psychological theories dealing with concepts of social identity and intergroup relations, as well as historical perspectives related to the unique culture of institutions of higher education. Each student will conduct a research study on a topic of their choosing relating to the present day culture of Middlebury College. SOC (M. Longman)

Matthew Longman, ’89, the Dean of Wonnacott Commons, has served as a dean of students at Middlebury College for the past fifteen years.

INTD 1100 Journeys to the Edge: Mountain Exploration and Adventure
In this course, we will examine the history and culture of mountain exploration and adventure through literature, nonfiction narrative, film, and guest presentations.  Students will trace changing cultural attitudes toward risk, adventure, masculinity, and wildness.  Although we will examine different aspects of exploration, we will focus primarily on Euro-American/western romantic approaches to mountains.  Readings will include MacFarlane, Mountains of the Mind; Bernstein, Ascent; and excerpts from work by Jon Krakauer, Jack Kerouac, Roderick Nash, Joe Simpson, and others.  This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with foci in the natural sciences. (Not open to students who have taken ENVS/ENAM 1015)  (S. Barnicle)

Scott P. Barnicle has been the Dean of Atwater Commons for the past fourteen years.

INTD 1102 Hospice and End-of-Life Care
In this course we will explore psychological, sociological, and cultural experiences involving death, learn about the modern hospice movement, palliative care, community services for patients, spirituality and dying, as well as after-death rituals and grief issues.  Guest presenters will include members of the local hospice team (nurses, social worker, chaplain, volunteer coordinator, local palliative care physicians), and specialists in bereavement and dementia.  We will examine variables that impact the end of life and ways to create a meaningful dying experience.  Each student will select a specific interest to explore in depth.  This course will include all the elements required to become a certified hospice volunteer for those wishing to work with hospice patients in the community. (Pass/Fail) SOC (P. Baker, a visiting winter term instructor)

Priscilla Baker is Program Director of Hospice Volunteer Services, a community organization that provides volunteer support to hospice patients, families, and caregivers; bereavement support to anyone who has experienced loss; and community education to promote a healthy understanding of death, dying, and loss. 

INTD 1109 Infectious Disease: Historical Epidemics, Current Dilemmas, and Emerging Problems
Have you ever wondered what happened during the Black Death? What modern-day implications does the bubonic plague hold? What’s really going on with HIV these days? Why do I get the cold and the flu every year? Why shouldn’t I drink the water in Otter Creek? In this course we will cover a broad array of topics past, present, and emerging in medical infectious disease. We will explore classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis, microbiology, immunology, and the social context of infectious diseases, from the perspective of the physician. This course counts as an elective towards the Global Health minor. SCI (A. Hale, R. Johanson, visiting winter term instructors)

Andy Hale, '06, is a resident in Internal Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and a Teaching Fellow at Harvard Medical School. He is starting an Infectious Disease Fellowship in 2014.
Russell Johanson, '06, is a resident in Emergency Medicine at the University of Massachusetts.  

INTD 1120 Spirit of Change: Shifting the Paradigm from Poverty to Prosperity
In this course we will engage with community-based programs attempting to shift the paradigm from poverty to prosperity; reflect on the ways our personal sense of social justice is formed and transformed; and consider the implications of our local learning in a global context. The interactive foci of this course are contemplative practice (two days will be spent in retreat at Treleven Farm); scholarly engagement with texts (Hahn’s Love in Action, Kunin’s The New Feminist Agenda, Palmer’s Let Your Life Speak,  and Senge’s Presence plus two texts co-selected by each student with the instructor) and small group engagement with a nonprofit agency. SOC (C. Mitchell, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell is the president of Treleven Inc, a learning and retreat collaborative that promotes stewardship and social action, reverence and innovation. She has also served as a consulting scholar in civic engagement for Middlebury College, a research professor and faculty member for UVM, Deputy Secretary of Vermont’s Agency of Human Services under Gov. Howard Dean, Coordinator of People of Addison County Together, and Co-Director of the Addison County Parent/Child Center. She and her family live on a three-generation sheep farm and being a Quaker has been a grounding influence in her life.

INTD 1122 Social Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts
What are the goals of the liberal arts? What is social entrepreneurship?  In this challenging new century, can these two ideals be complements or are they at odds? In this course we will first examine the two-and-a-half millennium history of the liberal arts, asking how ideals rooted in the classical Greek tradition still have meaning in the 21st Century.  We will then study the recent history of social entrepreneurship, in theory and in practice.  Students will conduct their own research with assistance from the Center for Social Entrepreneurship. (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) SOC (J. Isham)

INTD 1123 Communication and Connectedness: The Real and the Virtual
Computers and other digital technologies, rightly called ‘just tools’, do ingenious things, but are they changing our sense of humanity? For millennia, face-to-face communication was our only means for connecting with each other. Two consequences of the new digital media are the blurring of boundaries between what is virtual and what is real and the creation of what is described as ‘new solitude.’ We are now able to ‘bring the distant close’, but in so doing are we making ‘the close distant?’ In this course we will address questions and issues including and related to: What gains and losses do we experience through the use of new technologies? Does the ease of electronic accessibility create or deter yearned for connection? How does the blurring of virtual and real boundaries affect inter-personal problem solving, the establishment of values and trust, intergenerational communication, the importance of family, the expression and experience of love as well as other emotions, and do e-devices affect the way we define life? SOC (R. Marum, a visiting winter term instructor)

Roger Marum, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Middlebury, and a writer.

INTD 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Basic sitting and walking meditation will be taught and practiced. We will use the breath to foster a relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Meditation has been shown to lower stress and increase concentration, but the emphasis in this course will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavor. Contemporary readings from the Tibetan and Zen Buddhist traditions will be assigned but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Truth should be verified by one’s experience. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. AAL (J. Huddleston)

INTD 1131 Visual Data Analysis
If a picture is worth 1000 words, then a graph can illuminate 1000 data points.  In this course, we will explore the principles and tools of scientific data visualization, an underutilized but powerful way of understanding patterns in data.  Using datasets drawn from a variety of fields such as public health, geography, ecology, political science, and students' choice, we will gently introduce the computing language, R, the premier tool for data visualization and analysis.  No previous knowledge of programming is assumed, but by course's end, students will be able to write powerful scripts to analyze and present data in a clear and compelling way. (Pass/Fail) (M. Landis)

INTD/ MATH 1139 Understanding Uncertainty: Exploring Data Using Randomization
In this course we will use computer-intensive methods to explore the randomness inherent in a data set and to develop the scientific logic of statistical inference. We will introduce randomization methods as a basis for framing fundamental concepts of inference: estimates, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. The capabilities of computers to draw thousands of random samples and to simulate experiments will replace theoretical approximations grounded in mathematical statistics, especially the normal theory methods like t-tests and chi-squared analyses. Students will use the R programming language to implement the analyses. Much of the course development will proceed through independent and collaborative computer investigations by students using real data sets. No prior experience with statistics and with computer programming is necessary. CW, DED (J. Emerson)

INTD 1141 Recycle, Reuse, Reimagine: A Transformation Journey
In this course students will explore the process and possibilities that non-traditional and recycled found objects offer to create meaningful and imaginative works of art. Our main goal will be to look beyond the original function of objects and to creatively combine, arrange, and transform. With a strong focus on experimentation, students will complete several projects using different relief, assemblage, and construction techniques. No previous experience is necessary. Each student will be required to purchase their own tools and materials, costing approximately $120. ART (M. von Loebenstein, a visiting winter term instructor)

Michael Von Loebenstein (MFA) is a visual artist and educator living in Middlebury Vermont. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally.

INTD 1142 The Alienated Man
The alienated man has figured prominently in Western thought, challenging not simply received truths but the very foundations of philosophy and literature. In this course we will examine the role played by the alienated man from the ancient world to the modern age. Texts will include Augustine's Confessions, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Dostoevsky's Notes From Underground, and Camus' The Stranger. Norman Mailer's essay "The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster," will provide the basis for a final discussion on violence, insanity, and Lee Harvey Oswald. CW, PHL (P. Savodnik, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Savodnik, '94, is a journalist who contributes frequently to The New York Times Magazine. He has also written for The Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, The New Yorker, GQ and Wired. His book, on Lee Harvey Oswald’s Soviet foray, is being published by Basic Books.

INTD 1143 Craft in the Digital Age
Modern digital technologies offer new platforms for designing, testing, and fabricating the physical world. Design technology has become more user-friendly, allowing individuals to use and manipulate the ever-increasing amount of available data. Rapid prototyping and digital fabrication methods have modernized the way people design and make. In this course we will survey the history of craft and how the recent shift from analogue methods to digital production alter our understanding of our world. This course counts as a HARC elective. ART (C. Nielson, S. Ostrow, visiting winter term instructors)

Christopher Nielson, '06, is a designer interested in the nexus of technology and tradition. It is his goal to progress his practice of architecture while bringing his experience to the classroom.
Sam Ostrow is a designer and craftsman working in Middlebury Vermont. With interests in how materials and techniques can improve the quality of the built environment, he aims to explore the overlap between contemporary theory and practice.

INTD 1144 Introduction to Literary Journalism
Literary journalism is a genre of nonfiction writing that combines hard facts and credible research with a narrative voice that expresses emotion and opinion. Pioneers of this field include Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, John McPhee, and Gay Talese.  Today, you can find literary journalism in popular periodicals such as Harper’s, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker and Esquire, as well as in many major newspapers and online magazines.  In this course we will examine the antecedents of literary journalism and discuss selected examples of this genre (“New Journalism”) in order to understand the research techniques and aspects of craft that make them well written and resonant. This course counts as an introductory creative writing elective for the ENAM major. (J. Obuchowski)

Janice Obuchowski serves as a member of the editorial panel at the New England Review and also serves as a member of the admissions board for the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

INTD 1145 Health Disparities in the United States
In this course we will explore the growing conversation surrounding health inequities in the United States. We will examine how health and wellness are affected—and often determined—by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, geography, and ability. We will examine current policies, health determinants, and possible solutions to health inequities by reading works by experts such as David Williams and Ichiro Kawachi. Students will write short responses to the readings and a health autobiography that reflects on how their identities impact their health status. This course counts as an elective towards the Global Health minor. CMP, NOR, SOC (D. Simmons, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dena Simmons, '05, is a former NYC DOE middle school teacher and current doctoral candidate in the Health Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on assessing teacher preparedness to handle bullying situations in
the middle school context.

INTD 1146 Political Violence, Memory and Cultural Representation
In this course we will study cultural and human responses to the violence of genocide politics and the political repression of terrorist state in Latin America. Central to the theoretical and critical corpus of the course is the multidisciplinary work of scholars writing in response to historical violence, with questions regarding social trauma, the links between mourning and memory, and the social and cultural role of artistic creation. In order to introduce students to the complex issues of memory and violence in its subjective and social dimension, we will analyze a variety of sources, such as literature, film, art, oral history, journalism, and popular music. This course is taught in English. AAL, PHL (L. Evangelista)

Liria Evangelista is the Spanish Summer School Director at Middlebury College/Buenos Aires. She is also a literary critic and writer.

INTD 1147 The Dutch Maritime Empire in the Long Seventeenth Century
In this course we will learn about various aspects of the Dutch Golden Age, 1588-1712, and related maritime material culture. We will examine the establishment of the Dutch Republic, its rise as a major maritime power rivaled only by England, and the artistic preeminence of the Netherlands in this period. The focus will be on the institutional, colonial, and economic rise of this small but important nation.  This interdisciplinary course will be of particular interest to students of History, Art History, Literature, and International and Global Studies. This course counts as elective credit towards the History major. EUR, HIS (J. Schokkenbroek, a visiting winter term instructor)

Joost C.A. Schokkenbroek is Chief Curator at Het Scheepvaartmuseum Amsterdam and  holds the Scheepvaartmuseum chair in Maritime History and Maritime Heritage at VU University, Amsterdam.

INTD 1149 The Recipients of Aid
Despite international and domestic development efforts, poverty and inequity continue to characterize our world, and vastly different theories abound about how to eliminate them. In this course we will examine how development interventions might support empowerment and, more frequently, how development has reduced the capability of its recipients to address their own needs in the future. We will look at these impacts through a psychological lens, applying theories from social psychology to better understand the effects of external development efforts. We will also analyze the role that a changing global economy plays in marginalizing good development practice.  We will consider how to improve development practice using techniques developed from a social psychological perspective. SOC (S. Peterson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Stephen Petersen has 25 years of international development experience in applying concepts from social psychology to public health and community development programs in Botswana, Bhutan, Myanmar and Nepal. He is currently Country Director for Nyaya Health Nepal.

INTD 1151 The China Boom: The Historical Routes of China’s Current Economic Dynamism
In this course we will look backward into Chinese history to the mid-19th century through the series of essayist portraits of prominent officials, intellectuals, reformers and revolutionaries (Wei Yuan, Feng Guifen, the Empress Dowager, Liang Qichao, Sun Yat-sen, Chen Duxiu, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, Zhu Rongji, and Liu Xiaobo). Our goal will be to better understand how China, once “the sick man of Asia” managed to reincarnate itself in the 1980s to become the economic powerhouse of today.  Using intellectual and politically history as seen through the lives and works of these iconic Chinese thinkers and activists, we will seek to delineate the singular evolutionary pattern that, contrary to all western developmental theories, enabled China to transform itself into the superpower that it has become. AAL (O. Schell, a visiting winter term instructor)

Orville Schell is a writer who was educated in Chinese history at Harvard, Stanford, and UC Berkeley, where he became Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism. He is currently the Director of the Center on US-China Relations at the Asia Society in NYC.

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture. The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum. The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience.  AAL, LNG (B. Kafumbe, a visiting winter term instructor)

Betty Kafumbe holds a B.A. in music from Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda with voice and piano as her major instruments.  Having been born in Kenya, spent part of her childhood in Tanzania, and grown up in Uganda, Mrs. Kafumbe’s knowledge of Swahili is fairly eclectic. She also has experience in teaching Luganda, one of the main dialects used in Uganda.

Departmental Courses

American Studies

AMST 1007 Designing a Field House Museum for Middlebury College
In this course students will help design a museum space dedicated to the history of athletics at Middlebury College.  The work we accomplish will contribute to plans for the new Field House, to be erected in 2013-14.  Students will conduct archival research on the history of Middlebury athletics, and they will design interpretive exhibits utilizing digital and analog formats for inclusion in the new museum space. NOR (H. Allen)

AMST 1008 Evolution of Work in America: Industrial Revolution through Post-Industrial Society and Beyond
From farm to factory to office to virtual, work in the United States has dramatically changed since the turn of the last century.  In this course we will examine the evolution of work and the struggle of unions, governments, workers, and employers who shape and are shaped by these changes.  We will also assess forces framing the work of tomorrow.  Through books such as Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King, movies such as Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times and episodes of The Office, we will assess both the impact of work on culture and culture’s impact on work. NOR, SOC (J. Harvey, Jr., a visiting winter term instructor)

Jay Harvey, '78, has spent over 40 years academically and professionally examining work and the workplace in America.  He served as a staff director at the AFL-CIO; as Chief Labor Counsel for the U.S. Senate Labor & Human Resources Committee as well as for a variety of labor end employee relations roles for major U.S. companies; and most recently as a consultant on workplace issues.

AMST 1009 Asian Americans and the Cinema
In this course we will examine Asian American cinematic representations, from classic Hollywood to contemporary independent Asian American films. We will explore how Asian Americans have been depicted in mainstream films as well as how Asian Americans are framing themselves through independent films. We will approach the topic both chronologically and thematically as well as examine a number of cinematic genres and film forms, with films ranging from the Charlie Chan detective series (1920s-40s) to the musical Flower Drum Song (1961), the experimental Chan Is Missing (1982), and the documentary Seeking Asian Female (2013). Key issues will include: stereotypes of Asian Americans in classic Hollywood cinema; oppositional practices of Asian American independent films; intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality; and documenting selves and history through documentaries. CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC (W. Hwang)

Arabic

 ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (A. Almallah, R. Greeley, Staff)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well.  How do you randomize mice?  How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated?  If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer?  In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology.  We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results.  Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210) DED (D. Allen)

BIOL/NSCI 0235 Sexual Selection
Charles Darwin described sexual selection as the mode of selection that favors traits that enhance an individual’s reproductive success.  Sexual selection has shaped behavior, morphology, physiology, and cognition in many species.  We will read portions of Darwin’s The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex along with current journal articles representative of the major questions in the field.  Some of the topics discussed will include: mate choice, intrasexual competition, alternative mating strategies, sexual conflict, and the role of sexual selection in the evolution of the brain.  Students will lead discussions and write a final paper on sexual selection.  This course can be taken for Neuroscience and Biology major credit. (BIOL 0140 and 0145) SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 1005 Cancer in America: History, Biology and Social Impact
There were over 1.5 million new diagnoses of invasive cancer in the United States in 2010. While our overall approach to treating this ancient disease is still somewhat rudimentary, current treatment regimens have resulted in nearly two of three patients being cured. Despite this, a diagnosis of cancer remains a life altering event that can forever alter self-image and family dynamics. In this course students will be introduced to the history, basic biology, screening, and public policy of cancer. We will also explore the place that cancer holds in American society and how we, as individuals and society, approach this disease. This course counts as an elective towards the Global Health minor. SCI, SOC (J. Lally, D. Ozimek, visiting winter term instructors)

Jennifer Lally ’10, and David Ozimek ’09, are fourth year medical students at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine pursuing careers in Internal Medicine.

Chemistry & Biochemistry

CHEM 0241 Organic Chemistry I
This course is an introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules.   Topics covered include chemical nomenclature, bonding, structure, acid-base relationships, mechanistically simple reactions, and theoretical aspects of structure determination.  Laboratory exercises include hands-on introductions to techniques such as distillation, crystallization, chromatography, polarimetry, and modern spectroscopic techniques such as NMR and IR.  (Students must have received a grade of B- or better in CHEM 0104 or 0107) SCI (J. Byers, S. Oster)

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (H. Du, X. Jiang, C. Reed, H. Yang; J. Wang, a visiting winter term instructor) 

Classics

CLAS/GSFS 1016 Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine issues of gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of ancient texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. In addition we will examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities in literature and the actual roles of men and women in society. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Virgil, Ovid, and Catullus. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Classics and the major in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies) CMP, SOC (J. Evans, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jessica Evans is a lecturer at the University of Vermont and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Writing and Linguistics at Middlebury College

Comparative Literature

CMLT/PHIL 1014 Existential Philosophy and Literature
In this course we will examine how existential thinkers and writers confront core dilemmas of existence such as mortality, anxiety, and the paradox of life. Existential thinkers attempt to make sense of a disordered world, but more importantly, to live meaningful lives within a state of ambiguity. Themes such as the comic, the absurd, freedom, choice, and indirect communication will fuel our discussion of authenticity in response to paradox. Existentialism as a way of life will be central to our work, as will the relationship between philosophy and literature. Authors will include Kierkegaard, Kafka, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Dostoevsky. This course counts as elective credit towards the Philosophy major and the Comparative Literature major.  LIT, PHL (N. Rogerson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Nicholas Rogerson graduated with a B.A. from Colorado College and an M.A. from the University of Toledo, where he studied Philosophy with an emphasis on Social-Political Philosophy and Philosophy of/and Literature. 

Computer Science

CSCI 1002 Web Database Systems
In this course we will learn how to create an online database. We will cover the basics of database design using ER (Entity-Relation) modeling and SQL programming. We will build an SQL database and learn how to use PHP to create websites that interact with the database. Finally, we will learn how to create Java programs that interact with an SQL database. This course will count as an elective towards the CSCI major in the CSCI 0311-0314 category. (CSCI 0201) DED (A. Christman)

CSCI 1003 Generative Art
Generative art is process-driven creation in which the artist creates an autonomous system that produces the artwork as output. In this course we will write computer programs, focusing on algorithmic creation to generate images. We will discuss the nature of generative art and cover technical topics such as basic algorithmic drawing, image manipulation, randomness and noise, emergence, and visualization. There is no assumption of prior knowledge of programming, so significant time will be spent learning the basics of programming using Processing, a popular visually oriented programming language. DED (C. Andrews)

CSCI 1099 GUI Applications in C++/Qt
In this coding-intensive course, students will gain an understanding of the C++ language through the development of Graphical User Interface (GUI) applications within the cross-platform Qt development environment.  We will begin with small, simple applications, culminating in application development projects of the students’ choosing, all the while building our understanding of fundamental C++ concepts such as classes, templates, pointers, constructors/destructors, and ownership. (Approval required) (F. Swenton)

Dance

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can  expect daily rehearsals  plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval Required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (C. Brown) 

DANC 1014 Principles in Practice: Movement and Philosophies of Yoga
In this course we will explore the philosophy and physical practice of Yoga. Through a daily asana practice, lectures, readings, written assignments, and class discussions, we will invite a cohesive exploration and analysis of the art of yoga in relation to mental and physical activity.  Readings will include works by Indian authors T.K.V. Desikachar and B.K.S. Iyengar as well as western authors Cindy Lee and Stephen Cope in order to study the westernization of yoga and compare the history of yoga with its contemporary practice. (Approval required) ART, CMP, PE (C. Cabeen)

DANC/SOAN 1025 Move2Change: Social Activism and Performance
In this course we will examine the intersection between social activism and performance. This entry-level course will cover a brief history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism but will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will be drawn from fields ranging from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class.  This course counts as elective credit towards the Dance major. ART (T. Rhynard, a visiting winter term instructor)

Interlacing the parameters of activism and art, Tiffany Rhynard is a movement artist exploring the intersection between movement and image, specifically in dialogue with the study of human behavior. Rhynard established Big APE in 2008 as a platform for her adventures in movement and video. She currently lives in Gainesville, Florida where she works as a free-lance choreographer and filmmaker.

Economics

ECON 0429 Trade and Foreign Aid in Latin America … en Español
After a tour of major historical and contemporary topics in Latin American economic development, we will turn to an in-depth examination of several critical issues currently confronting policymakers in Latin America. Economic development, foreign aid and its efficacy, and regionalization and free trade will be analyzed in the context of Latin America. The overall objective is to develop an understanding of the issues, as well as the tools to assess and critique policies designed to address them, integrating models and methods you have learned in your economics training. This course will be taught in Spanish and fulfills a 0400-level seminar elective in economics. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255 or ECON 0340; Spanish course at 0300-level or higher or approval by instructor) AAL, LNG (J. Maluccio)

ECON 1017 The Application of Statistics to Sports
The central problem of quantitative analysis in any social science is trying to explain the complex and multivariate character of individual human and institutional behavior.  The problem of quantitative research, in turn, is that of finding a statistical method that yields a useful approximation of reality.  The objective of this course is to give students with an interest in athletic games an opportunity to apply the tools of statistical analysis to the study of several sports topics of their own choosing. (MATH  0116 or ECON 0210 strongly recommended) DED (P. Sommers) 

ECON 1023 Extending Financial Services to the Unbanked
In this course, taught by two experienced international development professionals, we will explore different interventions and tools used for poverty alleviation, financial inclusion, and the extension of financial services to the unbanked poor in emerging markets. We will look at the use of microfinance, microinsurance, financial literacy, and the rising use of technology to achieve these goals in developing countries. Guest speakers will discuss case studies and themes from the course. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Economics) SOC (P. Oldham, E. Toder, visiting winter term instructors)

Phil Oldham, '90, spent 20 years in international relief and development including postings in Russia, the Balkans, Africa, and Haiti before returning to Vermont to join the staff of Middlebury College in 2011.  
Elizabeth Toder, '90, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand 20 years ago, and since then has lived in Brazil, Argentina, Jordan, Haiti, and Vietnam developing microfinance and microinsurance programs. She is the Senior Manager for WaterCredit Advisory Services at Water.org

Education Studies

EDST 0317 Children and the Arts
This course will examine the integration of the arts into the elementary curriculum. Students will teach standards-based lessons that include the literary, performing, and visual arts. Activities will include art projects, sketch journals, reading assignments, and the exploration of community and teaching resources. Students will gain an understanding of the important role the arts can play in the curriculum through field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week) and class discussions. (Pass/Fail) ART (G. Humphrey)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (J. Murphy, a visiting winter term instructor)

John Murphy has 37 years' experience in public education, 13 years as a Speech-language Pathologist/special educator at the middle school, and 24 years as the Director of Special Education for the Addison Central Supervisory Union.

EDST 0337 The New York City Urban Education Internship
This internship provides teaching and learning opportunities at New York City Public Schools. During the term, each student will be assigned to work as an intern with a classroom teacher or program at a New York City school. Tasks will vary but may include: observing classes, tutoring, directing small-group work, working with special education students, working in the computer lab, and working with outreach programs. Students will spend five full days at the school each week, keep a journal, and complete a formal essay about their experience. In addition, there will be visits to other schools and educational programs in the area. (EDST 0115; Approval required, please contact Jonathan Miller-Lane or Trish Dougherty prior to registration). (Pass/Fail) (C. Beato, a visiting winter term instructor)

Carlos Beato, '07, is the Assistant Principal, 9th Grade, at New Visions Charter High School for Advanced Math and Science.

EDST 1001 Education for Sustainability in Action
What skills, knowledge, and attitudes do young people need to meet the challenges and opportunities that await them? What role do educators play in preparing students for their future? In this course we will consider these questions as students explore, experience, and create Education for Sustainability (EFS) in Burlington, VT. During the third week of the semester, students will live at Shelburne Farms, a global leader in EFS, as they observe and participate in EFS in K-12 classrooms. (E. Hoyler)

Emily Hoyler has been a Visiting Lecturer in Education Studies at Middlebury during the spring 2013 and fall 2014 semesters. She is also the curriculum specialist at Shelburne Farms.  She is currently working toward her Ph.D. in Environmental Studies with a focus on Education for Sustainability at Antioch University New England.

English and American Literatures

ENAM/WRPR 0288 Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings will include essays, stories, and poems by modern and contemporary writers such as: James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Amy Tan, Tim Wise, Sherman Alexie, Suheir Hammad, Junot Diaz, Ellen Gilchrist, and Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai. We will discuss the content and the style of these texts as well as engage in writing workshops, contemplative exercises, and a service learning exchange with high school writers in NYC. Writing assignments will consist of creative non-fiction, narrative criticism, and a research paper or project. CW, LIT (C. Wright)

ENAM 1001 Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Coetzee’s Elizabeth Costello, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective. LIT (C. Baldridge)

ENAM 1004 Short Dickens
“Whatever the word ‘great’ means,” wrote Chesterton, “Dickens was what it means.”  In this course we will study five of the shortest of Dickens’s fifteen novels, which appeared serially between 1837 and 1870: Oliver Twist, Hard Times, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood.  We will discuss, in addition, Dickens’s rise to fame, Victorian London, serial publication, sentimentalism, the illustrations to Dickens’s novels, as well as various commercial enterprises based on the mania for Dickens—among them the ill-fated Dickens World in Kent. EUR, LIT (E. Napier)

ENAM 1008 Writing Poems This Month, For A Lifetime
In this poetry writing and reading workshop, we will learn how personal, national and international “occasions”, events, and news offer us the opportunity to engage language, form, and feeling in writing and revising our poems. We will read published poems, as examples, and respond to prompts, in and out of class, that will allow us to experiment with and refine our own poems. This course counts as an introductory creative writing elective for the ENAM major. ART (G. Margolis)

Gary Margolis, '67, is an emeritus Executive Director and Associate Professor of English and American Literatures. He has had four books of poetry published and been on the staffs of the Bread Loaf, University of Vermont and Tennessee Writers’ Conferences.

ENAM/LNGT 1009 History of the English Language
Who was the first “dude”?  Is “unfriend” acceptable English? In this course we will explore the story of English as a history of language contacts and language change.  We will begin the story in 449 AD with the Germanic dialect of Anglo-Saxon invaders, and end by examining global Englishes in the digital age.  Along the way we will study literary and popular texts (from “Caedmon’s Hymn” to Harry Potter) representing the major English periods (Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Modern) in order to understand the changes in spelling, pronunciation, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary resulting from both internal evolution and such external, cultural factors as war, migration, global markets, music, film, television, and the internet. LIT, SOC (K. Skubikowski)  

ENAM 1010 The Nature of Intimacy
In this course we will investigate how contemporary ideas of nature, environmentalism, and environmental degradation intersect with different notions of intimacy. Scholars such as William Cronon, Val Plumwood, and Jenny Price will provide the backdrop for our exploration of a provocative range of literature and art—including fiction by Don DeLillo, photography by Subhankar Banerjee, poetry by Mary Oliver, and films by Werner Herzog. We will consider the following questions: can art and literature animate questions of intimacy in our environmental context; what kind of environmental politics can aesthetics inspire; and how is digital culture changing the face of nature and intimacy? This course counts as elective credit towards the ENAM major. ART (N. Jandl, a visiting winter term instructor)

Nathan Jandl, ’05, is a doctoral student in Literary Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he studies 20th-century American literature and environmental thought.

ENAM 1011 Celebration and Resistance: Modern Representations of War in Literature and Film
In this course we will consider some iconic war novels and films that have defined our modern understanding of war. In particular, we will consider the narrative as a vehicle for both celebration and resistance. Questions we will address include: Does the narrative change from war to war? Is there a “good” war in these narratives? If representation requires a kind of exaggeration to approximate its object, what happens when the object of representation is itself extreme? How is social capital transformed in war? What constitutes bravery in resistance? When does resistance become terrorism? What kinds of resistance are possible in literature? This course counts as elective credit towards the ENAM major. LIT (N. Haddad, a visiting winter term instructor)

Nellie Haddad earned her BA and PhD at UC Berkeley where she specialized in Early Modern Drama. Her particular interests are in the way Shakespeare is translated from text to stage and film.

CRWR 0380 Workshop: Nonfiction
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera--the tools of today's investigative journalists--students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course counts as a Creative Writing elective. (Approval Required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105. LIT (P. Lourie, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book for Henry Holt about Jack London in the Klondike.

Environmental Studies

 ENVS 1023 Sustainability: Writing and Rhetoric
In this writing-intensive course we will examine the ways in which sustainability and environmentalism have been shaped and defined through a variety of literary, scientific, political, and popular texts.  Class discussions will trace the roots of sustainability in environmental writing, analyze the diverse debates surrounding sustainability, and consider local, national, and international texts about sustainability. Students will engage with invited guest speakers, conduct field research on environmental texts in local communities and institutions, and create their own narratives and scenarios for sustainable futures based on their findings and speculations. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. CW (C. Weisser, a visiting winter term instructor)

Christian Weisser is an Associate Professor of English at Penn State University. He is the editor of the scholarly journal Composition Forum, and his research focuses on public writing, environmental discourse, and the rhetoric of sustainability.

ENVS/GEOG 1024 Conservation and Land Management in Practice
In this course we will investigate conservation and resource management issues with a focus on Trinchera Ranch, a 265-square mile ranch in the greater Sangre De Cristo Conservation Area in southern Colorado.  Studying the application of conservation tools and practices at spatial scales from site to landscape, we will explore forest, game, and wildlife management; agricultural production; water use/conservation; fire; and energy. We will visit public and private lands to glean the local, regional and national context and hear numerous perspectives. We will develop spatial (GIS-based) analyses for conservation and management efforts on the ranch and in the region. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. (Approval required; informational meeting on November 4 at 7:00 p.m. in MBH 331). (B. Hegman, M. Lapin)

ENVS 1025 Kingdom Community Wind - Perspectives On Renewable Energy Development
In this course we will study the Kingdom Community Wind Project in Lowell, Vermont. We will consider the perspectives of the project developers, project opponents, Public Service Board, legislature, and news media, and will examine the role of federal policy.  Using public materials from the permitting process and contemporaneous news coverage, we will analyze the case’s issues and arguments and the diverse positions taken by Vermont’s environmentalists.  We will ask: How should renewable energy projects be sited in Vermont? Is the existing approval process fair to neighboring towns and landowners?  Are the claims of project proponents and opponents accurate? This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. (B. Marks, a visiting winter term instructor)

Benjamin Marks, is an attorney who has represented public utilities before Vermont Public Service Board for the past seven years.

ENVS 1026 Impact Investing for a Sustainable Planet
In this course, we will explore the field of impact investing, with specific emphasis on innovative financing instruments ranging from venture capital to harvest finance. Using EcoEnterprises Fund as the platform for learning, we will focus on the evolution of the sector that encourages new business models (e.g., “first movers”, “lost leaders” and growth companies) which sustainably manage natural resources, mitigate climate change, and protect ecosystems while making a profit. We will look at tools to measure environmental and social metrics and financial results.  Lastly, we will discuss fund management strategies, including building a portfolio, effective due diligence, and structuring deals. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. (T. Newmark, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tammy E. Newmark, a leader in the impact investing field for 20 years, serves as President and CEO, EcoEnterprises Fund, a pioneering venture capital fund for sustainable ventures in emerging markets. 

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 1018 Cinematography
What makes a movie look beautiful? Whether it is the heat of a scorching desert, the chill of a glacial lake, or the grime of a city street, movies look and feel the way they do because of the cinematography. In this course we will work as dedicated digital video cinematographers.  In this course we will practice lighting, composition and camera movement, first in a single cinematic shot and then as a sequence of shots cut together.  We will apply the work of master cinematographers to our own creative work.  Finally, we will assemble into small teams to produce short film projects. (FMMC 0105) ART (D. Houghton)

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (I. Uricaru)

FMMC 1022 The Films of Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick’s films are technically dazzling and intellectually stimulating, and they always involve serious investigations into the nature of films. In this course we will examine the complexities of meaning generated by Kubrick's films, paying particular attention to questions of narrative and style. The course will explore how the films' thematic investigations relate to and evolve out of their stylistic and formal operations. We will study most of Kubrick's major works, including: Killer’s Kiss (1955); The Killing (1956); Paths of Glory (1957); Lolita (1962); Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1963); 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968); A Clockwork Orange (1971); Barry Lyndon (1975); The Shining (1980); Full Metal Jacket (1987); and Eyes Wide Shut (1999). Through a combination of lectures, close analysis, discussion, student presentations and readings, we will thoroughly examine the work of one of the great filmmakers of the 20th Century. ART (M. Falsetto, a visiting winter term instructor)

Mario Falsetto taught at the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University (Montreal) for over 30 years where he served as Graduate Program Director of the M.A. in Film Studies, Chair of the Cinema Department, and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts. He is the author of five books: two on the work of Stanley Kubrick and two books of original interviews with contemporary film directors.

FMMC 1134 Sound and Story: Documentary for the Airwaves
In this course students will learn the production skills and storytelling approach necessary to create compelling audio documentary. Through curated readings and practical exercises, we will cover field-recording basics and interview techniques which each student will use to produce their own short audio piece. At the conclusion of this seminar, each student will air their work in a public listening event. Each student will be required to purchase a set of studio quality, noise-canceling headphones (no ear buds) costing approximately $50. ART (E. Davis, a visiting winter term instructor)

Erin Davis’ audio documentary work has aired on NPR's All Things Considered and WNYC's Studio 360. She currently creates documentary for radio and film.

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (B. Humbert, J. Tamas) 

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS 1001 Performing Power
Social power is embedded in our identities, our bodies, and our performances of self. We will read about the intersectionality and performance of power in race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation. Texts will come from critical race and gender theorists (bell hooks, Judith Butler and Robin Bernstein), performance studies (Erving Goffman, Victor Turner, Richard Schechner, and Charlotte Canning), and 20th/21st century artists and critics (Richard Pryor, Aasif Mandvi, Peggy Shaw, and James Howard Kunstler). We will use the readings as a basis for the creation of multi-media pieces about the performance of power and the power of performance. SOC (J. Perry, a visiting winter term instructor)

Performance artist Janice Perry has toured and taught in the USA and Europe since 1982. See www.janiceperry.com. 

GSFS/CLAS 1016 Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine issues of gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of ancient texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. In addition we will examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities in literature and the actual roles of men and women in society. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Virgil, Ovid, and Catullus. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Classics and the major in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies) CMP, SOC (J. Evans, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jessica Evans is a lecturer at the University of Vermont and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Writing and Linguistics at Middlebury College

Geography

GEOG 1006 Space and Place in the Graphic Novel
The graphic novel is an increasingly popular genre combining art and written work used by journalists, fiction and nonfiction writers, artists, and academics. This genre presents new and exciting ways of understanding and representing space and place, concepts at the heart of human geography. In this course we will read graphic novels by Joe Sacco, Marjane Satrapi, and Art Spiegelman, among others. We will also read key texts from human geographers: Doreen Massey, Gillian Rose, David Harvey and Tuan Yi-Fu. Students will practice visual analysis, maintain reading journals, write critical reviews, and create mini graphic novels exploring space and place. ART, SOC (K. McKinney)

GEOG/ENVS 1024 Conservation and Land Management in Practice
In this course we will investigate conservation and resource management issues with a focus on Trinchera Ranch, a 265-square mile ranch in the greater Sangre De Cristo Conservation Area in southern Colorado.  Studying the application of conservation tools and practices at spatial scales from site to landscape, we will explore forest, game, and wildlife management; agricultural production; water use/conservation; fire; and energy. We will visit public and private lands to glean the local, regional and national context and hear numerous perspectives. We will develop spatial (GIS-based) analyses for conservation and management efforts on the ranch and in the region. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. (Approval required; informational meeting on November 4 at 7:00 p.m. in MBH 331). (B. Hegman, M. Lapin)

Geology

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

GEOL 1033 Paleolimnology
In a glaciated region like the Northeast, lacustrine sediments can be analyzed to interpret evolution of a lake and the surrounding catchment since deglaciation.  Students in this class will core a local lake through the ice and work in small groups analyzing the core in the laboratory.  The results will be pooled, allowing each student to interpret the postglacial sedimentary, geomorphic, and ecologic history of the lake basin.  Students will work independently and collectively, and will gain experience working with actual data on a project where the outcome is not known beforehand. Winter outdoor experience strongly recommended. SCI (J. Munroe)

GEOL 1034 Geology & Landscapes of France
France hosts a remarkable variety of landscapes, created by a wide range of geological processes: continental rifting and volcanic activity, mountain building, canyon carving, and coastline processes. In this course we will consider the major forces that shape a country, and the influence of geology on its economy and cultural heritage: fossil fuel and mineral ores, building material for castles and cathedrals, and the notion of terroir in agriculture and winemaking. Students will be encouraged to research the geological history and attributes of their own home state or country. SCI (C. Frankel, a visiting winter term instructor)

Charles Frankel, '79, has written several books on planetary geology, volcanology, and French landscapes and terroir.

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning  German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will
further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (N. Eppelsheimer, R. Russi)

Greek

GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I
This course is a rapid and intensive introduction to classical Greek for beginners. The aim of the course is to prepare students to read the major authors of Greek literature. In addition to a systematic study of grammar and syntax, we will also read excerpts from a variety of ancient authors. LNG (P. Sfyroeras, C. Star) 

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Goldman)  

History

HIST 1023 Unnatural Border
In this course we will explore how the U.S.-Mexico border transformed from a “line in the sand” to a place of increasing physical presence. The 20th century brought customs stations and fences to channel bodies through a federally regulated space. Over time, fences and check points transformed into walls, buildings, and a network of roads built to control the movement of mobile nature: people, animals, and pathogens. Using both primary and secondary texts, documentaries, and news articles, we will learn why federal agencies created an unnatural border and how it has affected immigration and the environment in the borderlands. This course counts as elective credit towards the History major. NOR, SOC (M. Mendoza, a visiting winter term instructor)

Mary E. Mendoza , '06, is a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Davis. She has a Master’s Degree from American University, 2010; and a Master's Degree from the University of California, Davis (2012).

HIST/ITAL 1024 “Il Nuovo Mondo:” Italian Contributions to American Culture
Between 1880 and 1920, more than four millions Italians migrated to the U.S.A. In this course we will explore this diaspora in historical, social, and economic terms by analyzing the situation in Italy in the 1860s and 1870s and the perception of the new world as a “promised land.” We will consider the hardship of the uprooting experience of every migrant, the conflicts with previous immigrants, and the problems of cultural integration. We will also examine the Italian-American contributions to various areas of American life (e.g. music, food, etc.) We will also explore the exceptional situation of Italians in Vermont. CMP, HIS, NOR (I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

HIST 1025 Ni Yankees ni Marxismo: Peronismo: Its Origins and Political Development, Its Cultural Projection, and Its Relationship with the U.S. (Offered in English)
In this course we will consider the rise of Populism and its political experience in Argentina in order to study the cultural core of the Peronist social movement. Through the study of oral history, popular culture, and personalities such as Juan Perón, Eva Perón, and Brasil’s Getúlio Vargas we will examine the building of political popular sentiment and the continental nature of Populism. In addition we will examine the interaction between Peronism and U.S. foreign policy and how it shaped the Argentinian experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the History major. AAL, SOC (C. González Chiaramonte, a visiting winter term instructor)

Claudio González Chiaramonte is the Director of the Middlebury College School in Latin America. After studying in the United States as a Fulbright Fellow and Scholar, and earning his Ph.D. in History at the State University of New York (Stony Brook), Claudio returned to his native Argentina, where he taught 20th century history and foreign relations of the U.S. and Latin America.

History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design        
This is a studio course that introduces its members to the values and methods used in the practice of architecture, landscape architecture, and environmental art.  A daily journal and intensive group and individual work within the studio space are requirements.  This course demands an exceptionally high commitment of time and energy. The course's goals are to use the process of design to gain insight regarding individual and community value systems, and to provide basic experience in the design professions.  It is recommended for anyone wishing to improve his or her appreciation for the built environment.  Students should anticipate that substantial additional time will be required in the studio in addition to the scheduled class time.  ART (A. Murray)

HARC 0332 Buildings in Context
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that enrich and deepen our understanding of architecture and the built environment.  This seminar will help students hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, and provide them with the tools to probe the relationship of the built environment to professional practices and larger cultural forces. In general, students will gain an awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and will sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of architecture. It is strongly encouraged that students majoring in Architectural Studies take this course in their second or third year. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW, HIS (E. Sassin)

HARC 0345 Four American Artists
In this course we will examine the art and lives of four masters of American modernism: Ansel Adams, Georgia O'Keeffe, Man Ray, and Joseph Cornell.   While Adams and O'Keeffe projected nationalist and environmental themes in their work, Man Ray and Cornell offered a European-based Surrealist approach.  Through examining these artists and the interconnections between them, we will consider photography, painting, sculpture, and film in the context of American modernist art. We will consider the following questions: What makes art modern?  What is the role of national identity? How do artists work in a variety of media?  What makes these artists important?  ART, NOR, HIS (K. Hoving)

HARC 1014 Experiencing the Bauhaus Vorkurs
The Bauhaus, in the words of its originator, was an ‘idea’.  This idea—a state run experiment in arts education during the Weimar Republic—remains one of the most powerful underlying generators for modern design from buildings to furniture available at IKEA. Fundamental design principles were introduced through an intensive course, the Vorkurs, taught by luminaries Itten, Kandinsky and Albers.  In this course we will experience a condensed Vorkurs.  Content will include historical background for design principles which will be explored through hands-on design workshops. No prior artistic proclivities needed, just a desire to experience expressing one’s inner self through form. This course counts as a HARC elective. ART, HIS (W. Cox)

HARC 1016 Art in Action: Performance Art in Context  
In this course we will survey the history of performance art with particular emphasis on the activities of the Guerrilla Girls and a number of street artists whose works express a political point of view. Based on our study we will organize an exhibition of posters by the Guerrilla Girls for installation in the Museum in the spring of 2014. This course counts as a HARC elective. ART (E. Donadio)

Emmie Donadio, Chief Curator of the Middlebury College Museum of Art, has organized exhibitions on 20th-century art, photography, and sculpture at Middlebury and other venues, and currently oversees the acquisition of contemporary art at the college museum.

Italian

ITAL 0102 Intensive Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (A. Barashkov, P. Zupan)

ITAL 1002 Italian Cinema
In this course we will study the major developments in Italian cinema from post-war Neorealism to the present.  We will screen numerous films, including works by Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier-Paolo Pasolini, Bernardo Bertolucci, Lina Wertmüller, Sergio Leone, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, and Marco Bellocchio.  This course is taught in English. ART, EUR (T. Van Order)

ITAL/HIST 1024 “Il Nuovo Mondo:” Italian Contributions to American Culture
Between 1880 and 1920, more than four millions Italians migrated to the U.S.A. In this course we will explore this diaspora in historical, social, and economic terms by analyzing the situation in Italy in the 1860s and 1870s and the perception of the new world as a “promised land.” We will consider the hardship of the uprooting experience of every migrant, the conflicts with previous immigrants, and the problems of cultural integration. We will also examine the Italian-American contributions to various areas of American life (e.g. music, food, etc.) We will also explore the exceptional situation of Italians in Vermont. CMP, HIS, NOR (I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese  
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (M. Arakaki, M. Takahashi, L. White)

Linguistics

LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor. (K. Hanta)

Karin Hanta is the Director of Chellis House at Middlebury College, and has an ABD in translation studies. 

LNGT/ENAM 1009 History of the English Language
Who was the first “dude”?  Is “unfriend” acceptable English? In this course we will explore the story of English as a history of language contacts and language change.  We will begin the story in 449 AD with the Germanic dialect of Anglo-Saxon invaders, and end by examining global Englishes in the digital age.  Along the way we will study literary and popular texts (from “Caedmon’s Hymn” to Harry Potter) representing the major English periods (Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Modern) in order to understand the changes in spelling, pronunciation, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary resulting from both internal evolution and such external, cultural factors as war, migration, global markets, music, film, television, and the internet. LIT, SOC (K. Skubikowski) 

Mathematics

MATH 1009 Discovering Infinity
"Infinity" has intrigued poets, artists, philosophers, musicians, religious thinkers, physicists, astronomers, and mathematicians throughout the ages.  Beginning with puzzles and paradoxes that show the need for careful definition and rigorous thinking, we will examine the idea of infinity within mathematics, discovering and presenting our own theorems and proofs about the infinite. Our central focus will be the evolution of the mathematician’s approach to infinity, for it is here that the concept has its deepest roots and where our greatest understanding lies. In the final portion of the course, we will consider representation of the infinite in literature and the arts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1229). 3 hrs. lect. DED, PHL (M. Olinick) 

MATH/INTD 1139 Understanding Uncertainty: Exploring Data Using Randomization
In this course we will use computer-intensive methods to explore the randomness inherent in a data set and to develop the scientific logic of statistical inference. We will introduce randomization methods as a basis for framing fundamental concepts of inference: estimates, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. The capabilities of computers to draw thousands of random samples and to simulate experiments will replace theoretical approximations grounded in mathematical statistics, especially the normal theory methods like t-tests and chi-squared analyses. Students will use the R programming language to implement the analyses. Much of the course development will proceed through independent and collaborative computer investigations by students using real data sets. No prior experience with statistics and with computer programming is necessary. CW, DED (J. Emerson) 

Music

MUSC 0259 Musicianship
In this course students will develop aural perception and listening skills, music reading ability, and enhanced ensemble performance skills. Daily work will include fundamental and advanced musicianship concepts in these areas along with the study of score analysis and interpretation in performance. (MUSC 0109 or MUSC 0160 or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (J. Buettner)

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (C. Christensen Evancho; D. Anderson, H. Rommer, visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson is the executive director of Town Hall Theater, Middlebury.  Carol Christensen teaches voice in the Department of Music at Middlebury College. Hannah Rommer, '08.5, has conducted musical theatre, orchestras, and choruses. She is a Masters student at Bard College Conservatory. 

MUSC 1022 Electronic Music
In this course we will begin with an overview of the theory and techniques of electronic music, and then focus on developing student projects from conception to fruition. Individual and group projects will be supplemented with listening and discussion of important electronic works. Much of the focus will be on how the electronic medium enables composers to work with sound and musical forms in non-traditional ways. Software, techniques, and listening will be driven by the needs of the students’ projects. This course is not open to students who have taken MUSC 0212. ART (E. Beglarian, a visiting winter term instructor)

Eve Beglarian is an internationally acclaimed composer who works in acoustic and electronic media, dance, and theater. The natural and cultural environments are integral to her work.

Neuroscience

NSCI/BIOL 0235 Sexual Selection
Charles Darwin described sexual selection as the mode of selection that favors traits that enhance an individual’s reproductive success.  Sexual selection has shaped behavior, morphology, physiology, and cognition in many species.  We will read portions of Darwin’s The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex along with current journal articles representative of the major questions in the field.  Some of the topics discussed will include: mate choice, intrasexual competition, alternative mating strategies, sexual conflict, and the role of sexual selection in the evolution of the brain.  Students will lead discussions and write a final paper on sexual selection.  This course can be taken for Neuroscience and Biology major credit. (BIOL 0140 and 0145) SCI (M. Spritzer)

Philosophy

PHIL/CMLT 1014 Existential Philosophy and Literature
In this course we will examine how existential thinkers and writers confront core dilemmas of existence such as mortality, anxiety, and the paradox of life. Existential thinkers attempt to make sense of a disordered world, but more importantly, to live meaningful lives within a state of ambiguity. Themes such as the comic, the absurd, freedom, choice, and indirect communication will fuel our discussion of authenticity in response to paradox. Existentialism as a way of life will be central to our work, as will the relationship between philosophy and literature. Authors will include Kierkegaard, Kafka, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Dostoevsky. This course counts as elective credit towards the Philosophy major and the Comparative Literature major.  LIT, PHL (N. Rogerson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Nicholas Rogerson graduated with a B.A. from Colorado College and an M.A. from the University of Toledo, where he studied Philosophy with an emphasis on Social-Political Philosophy and Philosophy of/and Literature.  

PHIL/PSCI 1038 Thinking Revolution
The French Revolution brought philosophical ideals of equality and self-government into modern politics with unprecedented force and suddenness. In its violent wake, Enlightenment thinkers fiercely debated the limits of progress, institutional reform, and the relation between human nature and government. We will begin with a consideration of Rousseau’s articulation of the social contract and natural right concepts that explicitly inspired revolutionaries. We will then examine the Burke and Paine debate on the comparative advantages of tradition and abstract rights as the basis of government. Finally, we will compare Hannah Arendt’s account of the French and American revolutions with these earlier authors’ challenges in order to reconceive the relation between thought and action in the form of participatory politics. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL (J. Champlin, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jeffrey Champlin, '95, is an associate fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center of Bard College and is also teaching political philosophy and literature this year at The Bard Honors College of  Al-Quds University (East Jerusalem). His teaching and writing focus on political theory, German literature, and aesthetics.

Physics

PHYS 0111 Thermodynamics, Fluids, Wave Motion, and Optics
This lecture and laboratory course covers concepts from classical physics that are not included in PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110, and that serve as a bridge between those two courses. Topics include thermal properties of matter, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, wave motion, sound, and geometrical and physical optics. This course is strongly recommended for all students otherwise required to take PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110 as part of a major or  a premedical program, and is required for physics majors. (PHYS 0109, MATH 0121, or equivalent) DED, SCI (A. Goodsell, S. Watson) 

Political Science

PSCI 1020 American Power: Use and Abuse
The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Libya intervention and the conflicts in Syria have raised important questions about how the United States chooses to use its power on behalf of its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since World War II.  Based on selected case studies, we will examine pro and con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with extensive class debate and discussion. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) NOR, SOC (S. Sloan, a visiting winter term instructor)

Stan Sloan, a retired U.S. government foreign and defense policy specialist and research manager, lectures widely in Europe and the United States and is author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, reports for Congress and books including Permanent Alliance? (Continuum Books, 2010), and The Use of U.S. Power, Implications for U.S. Interests (Georgetown University 2004).

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (J. Douglas)

PSCI 1030 Comparative Political Behavior
In this course we will examine the role played by the masses in politics. We will explore public opinion, voting behavior, and other forms of political participation in a variety of contexts ranging from established democracies in Western Europe, to new democracies in the former USSR, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The primary goals of this course are to gain an understanding of the salient parts of the scholarly debate on political participation, and to analyze the factors that motivate citizens to participate in political life. (Comparative Politics) SOC (E. Mezini, a visiting winter term instructor)

Evis Mezini holds an MA in International Studies from Claremont Graduate University and is currently finishing a PhD in Comparative and World Politics. Her research and teaching interests include political behavior, regime transition, ethnic conflict and nationalism, institutions, and EU integration.

PSCI 1035 Contemporary Political Thought
In this course we will survey political theory in the United States and Europe from 1945 to the present.  Students will explore a broad range of topics, including the revival of political philosophy, relativism, rationalism, totalitarianism, contemporary liberal theory, communitarianism, conservatism, multiculturalism, and postmodernism. We will study leading works by some of the twentieth century’s most influential political thinkers.  Authors will include Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Michael Oakeshott, Isaiah Berlin, Eric Voegelin, John Rawls, Michael Sandel, Michael Walzer, and Michel Foucault. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL, SOC (K. Callanan)

PSCI 1036 Afghan Legal and Political History
In this course we will review the political and legal history of Afghanistan from before the first British-Afghan war to the present. We will examine the current sources of Afghan law, and explore the relevance of western law in light of Afghanistan’s historical struggle between the center and the periphery, and its culture of tribal loyalties, warlords, and political patronage. We will also consider the disastrous results of 35 years of war on most aspects of government, including the very idea of the rule of law. (Comparative Politics) AAL (J. Gelber, a visiting winter term instructor)

James Gelber has been a federal prosecutor in Vermont for 23 years. He worked in Afghanistan for 15 months as a mentor for Afghan judges and prosecutors.

PSCI 1037 The Political Economy of the Euro Crisis
In this course we will undertake an in-depth analysis of the current Euro crisis, a complex process that began as a purely economic crisis and turned into a political crisis that is reshaping the “balance of power” within the European Union. After a short introduction to the European monetary system, we will address the main reasons behind the current Euro crisis, paying particular attention to the issue of sovereign debt as a major economic and political problem in Southern Europe. We will then examine the German austerity approach to the crisis and Germany’s attempts to impose policies on the so-called “non-virtuous” Mediterranean nations in this time of crisis. This course counts as elective credit in Economics. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) EUR (S. Lagi, a visiting winter term instructor)

Sara Lagi is a lecturer on the European Union and Contemporary Italy at the Middlebury College School in Italy, Florence.

PSCI/PHIL 1038 Thinking Revolution
The French Revolution brought philosophical ideals of equality and self-government into modern politics with unprecedented force and suddenness. In its violent wake, Enlightenment thinkers fiercely debated the limits of progress, institutional reform, and the relation between human nature and government. We will begin with a consideration of Rousseau’s articulation of the social contract and natural right concepts that explicitly inspired revolutionaries. We will then examine the Burke and Paine debate on the comparative advantages of tradition and abstract rights as the basis of government. Finally, we will compare Hannah Arendt’s account of the French and American revolutions with these earlier authors’ challenges in order to reconceive the relation between thought and action in the form of participatory politics. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL (J. Champlin, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jeffrey Champlin, 95, is an associate fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center of Bard College and is also teaching political philosophy and literature this year at The Bard Honors College of  Al-Quds University (East Jerusalem). His teaching and writing focus on political theory, German literature, and aesthetics.

PSCI 1039 Security Issues in South Asia
In this course we will examine various security matters in South Asia, including interstate conflict, terrorism, and issues related to weapons of mass destruction. South Asia refers to the region encompassing Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. However, given that security matters in Afghanistan are linked closely to Pakistan, this course will include Afghanistan as part of the broader southern Asian region. We will look at topics from the historical, political-economic, and foreign policy perspective. We will discuss various conflicts between countries, including the India-Pakistan dyad, and the reasons behind the wars between them. Cases studies will include Islamist terrorism in the region, and the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. This course will also consider nontraditional security matters such as environmental degradation and refugee movements. (International Relations) AAL, SOC (S. Joshi, a visiting winter term instructor)

Sharad Joshi, PhD. Assistant Professor, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies Program, Graduate School of International Policy and Management, Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA.

Portuguese

PGSE 0102 Intensive Beginning Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0101 and a pre-requisite for PGSE 0103. (PGSE 0101) LNG (L. Silva) 

Religion

RELI 1020 Giving Meaning to Ordinary Time: Exploring the Cycles of our Lives and our Year from a Jewish and Christian Perspective
Beginning with an overview of historical developments within both Judaism and Christianity, we will examine selected holy days, holidays, and life-cycle rituals of these traditions. Selected celebrations will be studied in terms of their development and practice, and their role in expressing a theology and a system of values. We will explore themes such as: the human condition and its challenges; forgiveness, repentance and atonement; salvation; the tension between historical memory and spiritual reinterpretation; and the function of ritual in society will be explored. These will include contemporary issues around gender, emerging practices, and the portrayal of religious celebrations in pop culture. PHL (I. Schiffer; S. McGarry, a visiting winter term instructor)

Ira Schiffer is the Associate Chaplain and Rabbi of Middlebury College.
Susan McGarry is the Rector at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Middlebury, Vermont.

RELI 1032 Islam in America
Islam has a long history in America.  However, beginning in the 1960s, large numbers of Muslims from across the globe began relocating to America after restrictive immigration laws eased.  Today, Islam is reportedly America’s fastest growing religion. In this course we will consider the faith and teachings of Islam, Islam in the African American community, immigrant Muslim communities in the United States,  issues of cultural and religious identity, Muslim women in America, and the ways that second generation Muslims are reshaping Islam in the American context.  Throughout the course, our focus will be on the making of an American Islam.  CMP, HIS, NOR, PHL (A. Anzali, B. Rochford) 

RELI 1033 Three Hundred Ramayanas: The Life of a Hindu Epic
In a well-known essay, scholar A.K. Ramanujan asks: “How many Ramayanas?  Three hundred?  Three thousand?”  Featuring prince Rama, his wife Sita, and brother Laksmana, the Ramayana is a complex narrative that has been told and retold in numerous contexts for the past twenty-five hundred years.  Beginning with Valmiki’s Sanskrit text, we will examine various retellings of the Ramayana in South Asia.  We will then shift to discussing the performative life of the text, including dramatic Ramlila performances, Ramanand Sagar’s well-known television serial, and the popular comic book Amar Chitra Katha. We will conclude by examining the political significance of the Ramayana in contemporary Hindu-Muslim interactions. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1399) AAL, PHL (H. Kamath)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Beyer; S. Titkova, a visiting winter term instructor) 

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN 1024 From Famine to Feasting: The Role of Food in Modern Chinese Culture
Utilizing anthropological and historical studies, we will examine the role and meanings of food in modern Chinese culture. Topics will include famine and the legacy of famine, the role of food in popular religion, banqueting and feasting, and the impact of fast food and food scandals on the relationship between food and culture in reform-era China. AAL, SOC (E. Oxfeld)

SOAN/DANC 1025 Move2Change: Social Activism and Performance
In this course we will examine the intersection between social activism and performance. This entry-level course will cover a brief history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism but will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will be drawn from fields ranging from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class.  This course counts as elective credit towards the Dance major. ART (T. Rhynard, a visiting winter term instructor)

Interlacing the parameters of activism and art, Tiffany Rhynard is a movement artist exploring the intersection between movement and image, specifically in dialogue with the study of human behavior. Rhynard established Big APE in 2008 as a platform for her adventures in movement and video. She currently lives in Gainesville, Florida where she works as a free-lance choreographer and filmmaker.

SOAN 1026 Native Americans of Northern New England
In this course students will be introduced to Native Americans of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine from pre-European contact to present.  Following a survey of Abenaki peoples and the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac, and Maliseet, we will explore the connection between settlement patterns, population increase, and subsistence economies based on reading assignments. Classroom discussions within a seminar format will focus on the following subjects: peopling of the Americas; wild plant domestication transition to cultigen horticulture; Native American impact on natural ecology; present-day popular myths and misinformation about Native Americans; and the continuing struggle of Native American tribes seeking recognition from state and federal governments. Not open to students who have taken INTD 1132. CMP, NOR, SOC (D. Mathewson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Duncan Mathewson is an Anthropologist with over 40 years of archaeological experience.  He has a Ph.D. in Education, ABD in Environmental Archaeology and an MA in Anthropology.  He is presently writing an up-dated synthesis of the Pre-Contact cultures of the Western Abenaki of Northern New England to be published in 2014.

SOAN 1070 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. (Anthropology) AAL, LNG (M. Sheridan)

Spanish

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish             
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (A. Fil, F. Quintanilla, D. Rodriguez-Solas)  

SPAN 0398 Too Much Power: Authoritarian Leaders in Spanish America
What is it like to live in a society where power is highly concentrated in the hands of one individual? The death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez (1954-2013) has stirred debate about political leadership, authoritarianism, populism, and democracy in Latin America. In this course we will study three very different authoritarian figures whose similarities enjoin us to rethink the borders between left and right: Hugo Chávez (in office 1999-2013), Fidel Castro (1961-2011), and Alberto Fujimori (1990-2000). In order to locate their regimes in their social, ideological, and historical contexts, materials will include their speeches and writings, along with novels, political theory, films, documentaries, news articles, pamphlets, and visual art. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or by waiver) AAL, CMP, LNG, SOC (F. Aguirre)

SPAN 1111 Hispanic Horror Cinema
In this course we will study horror films from Spain, Mexico, the United States, Argentina, and Cuba in order to understand how Hispanic filmmakers employ intertextual horror esthetics to create genre films. The films we will consider focus on zombies (Rec, Planet Terror, Juan of the Dead), vampires (Cronos, Vampires in Havana), ghosts  (The Devil's Backbone, The Others), and misogynist stalkers (Thesis, Sleep Tight). We will discuss both the conservative and transgressive aspects of this emerging genre in transnational Hispanic cinema, focusing specifically on how these films reflect the evolving political and ideological dynamics of their respective national cultures. This course will be taught in Spanish. ART, LNG (E. Garcia)

Studio Art

ART 0159 Studio Art I: Drawing
This course is a complete and thorough basic drawing course. Mediums used will be pencil, charcoal, and ink, among others. Work will be done from observation and invention. Line, perspective, value, composition, and introduction to color will be discussed. Assignments will involve students with the formal and technical aspects of drawing and with the idea of drawing as an individual means of expression. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. This course is required of all art majors and minors.  ART (M. Jordan)

ART 1026 The Magic Image: An Introduction to Digital Photography
In this hands-on course using digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras, Adobe software, and Epson photo printers, students will master the basics of photography, both in terms of technical skills and aesthetic strategies. Topics will include exposure, white balance, file formats, lens types, depth of field, motion blur, noise, file organization, digital development, aesthetic strategies, and introductory theories of photography. Weekly assignments accompanied by slide lectures on historical and contemporary artwork will explore the language of photography. A 35mm DSLR with manual controls and a $100 fee for materials is required. This course counts as an elective towards the major or minor in Studio Art. ART (G. Gatewood)

Gigi Gatewood, '03, an artist working in photography and video was recently awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Trinidad & Tobago. She is currently on faculty at International Center of Photography.

ART 1125 Introduction to Traditional Black & White Photography
Students will learn how to expose, develop, and to print black and white negative film in a wet darkroom. Contemporary and historical fine art approaches to the medium will be explored through assignments and slide lectures. Development of personal vision and expression will be emphasized. This is an intensive workshop style course. Functional 35mm film camera with full manual controls is required. Each student will be required to contribute $125 towards the cost of materials. This course counts as an elective towards the major or minor in Studio Art. ART (M. Mantell, a visiting winter term instructor)

May Mantell has an MFA in Studio Art from Stanford University and a BFA in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute. She has taught Photography and Studio Art courses at Stanford, The San Francisco Art Institute, UVM, & Middlebury College.

Theatre

THEA 0224 Winter Production Studio
We will be designing and creating the scenery, props, and lighting for the touring of the theatre production Pentecost to the American College Theatre Festival (ACTF). Students will be exposed to professional production and design practices in all areas of the theatrical stage.  Depending on area of interest, students will be involved in projects consisting of designing, planning, constructing, painting, hanging, focusing, as well as running and striking the production. Readings, research, drafting, modeling, and writing of journals will be required. ART (M. Evancho)

THEA/INTD 1021 Oratory: A Speechmaking Studio
Our teachers will be great speeches wherever we find them: from Antiquity and the Elizabethan stage, to Hollywood, the Civil Rights Movement, and TEDTalks gone viral. We will explore various theories of oratory, and, like students of classical rhetoric, we will emulate masterworks in order to sharpen our own persuasive skills. As speakers, we will practice vocal and physical techniques used by performers, as well as their methods for analyzing text. During the course, students will write and deliver their own speeches, completing an immersion into speechmaking designed to help them communicate with precision, empathy, and personal conviction. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1355 or FYSE 1398) ART (D. Yeaton)

Writing Program

WRPR/ENAM 0288 Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings will include essays, stories, and poems by modern and contemporary writers such as: James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Amy Tan, Tim Wise, Sherman Alexie, Suheir Hammad, Junot Diaz, Ellen Gilchrist, and Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai. We will discuss the content and the style of these texts as well as engage in writing workshops, contemplative exercises, and a service learning exchange with high school writers in NYC. Writing assignments will consist of creative non-fiction, narrative criticism, and a research paper or project. CW, LIT (C. Wright)

Student Led

STLD 1006 A People's History of Middlebury College
A people’s history is a history centered on marginalized voices and on periods of struggle. In this course we will first define the meaning of the term “marginalization.” We will investigate questions such as: How have marginalized Middlebury students/faculty/staff viewed their experiences here? What has resistance looked like at Middlebury? What is the relationship between education and action on our campus? We will draw from primary and secondary historical sources including Stameshkin’s history of Middlebury College, oral histories from current and past members of the Middlebury community, and resources in the College Archives.  As an interdisciplinary Education Studies course, we will use supplementary texts and multimedia resources on people’s histories, student/worker movements, the development of higher education since the early 19th century, and educational and social theory. (Approval Required; Credit/No Credit) (H. Mahon, K. Johansson; advised by J. Miller-Lane) 

Off-Campus Courses

GEOG/ENVS 1024 Conservation and Land Management in Practice
In this course we will investigate conservation and resource management issues with a focus on Trinchera Ranch, a 265-square mile ranch in the greater Sangre De Cristo Conservation Area in southern Colorado.  Studying the application of conservation tools and practices at spatial scales from site to landscape, we will explore forest, game, and wildlife management; agricultural production; water use/conservation; fire; and energy. We will visit public and private lands to glean the local, regional and national context and hear numerous perspectives. We will develop spatial (GIS-based) analyses for conservation and management efforts on the ranch and in the region. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors. (Approval required; informational meeting on November 4 at 7:00 p.m. in MBH 331). (B. Hegman, M. Lapin)

Monterey Institute of International Studies

MIIS 8500A Development Project Management Institute (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

MIIS 8500B Team El Salvador – El Salvador*

MIIS 8500C Transitional Injustice and Chile’s Vulnerable Populations – Chile*

*The deadline for applying for the courses available through Monterey, as advertised in an October email to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, was October 16.

 

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.