COVID-19: Essential Information

Winter Term 2021

 

Click HERE for CURRICULAR Information
Click HERE for REGISTRATION Information
Click HERE FOR "OPT-OUT" Information

WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
  
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
   
Black Studies
    Comparative Literature
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Food
    Interdepartmental 
    International & Global Studies
    Linguistics
    Writing Program
 

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German
 
  Greek
   Hebrew
   Latin
   Luso Hispanic Studies
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Anthropology
  Education Studies
  Economics
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
  

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Chemistry
   Computer Science
   Geography
   Physics

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute

Middlebury Study Abroad

American Studies

AMST 1017 Material Culture in Focus
In this course we will investigate material culture, objects made or altered by human hands and design. We will keep a tight focus on one object or group of objects, cultivating an in-depth understanding and benefitting from access to local collections, curators, makers, and users. The focus will change annually, but the subject will always be an object of material culture that students will examine first-hand and research. Students will then create a lasting documentation and analysis of the work for public benefit, whether as an exhibition, a publication, or a website.  

For Winter 2021, we will focus on hair and hairwork, exploring the multivalent meanings of hair in American culture, past and present. Nineteenth-century Americans often saved or exchanged locks of hair as mementos, constructing elaborate items of jewelry or keepsake wreaths that emblematized familial relationships and kinship networks. These tokens could serve memorial purposes or solidify friendships. This material, crafted from the body, was often worn on the body, near the heart, or displayed within the intimate space of the home. In more recent decades, hair has become an activist issue and a potent political medium for artists foregrounding feminism and ethnic or racial identity. In this course, we will study many artifacts of hairwork in local collections, conducting archival research and sharing our findings via a website and exhibition; a studio workshop will give us hands-on experience with Victorian techniques of hairwork. We’ll also consider the work of contemporary artists who use hair as a medium: Janine Antoni, Mark Bradford, Sonya Clark, Aisha Cousins, Wenda Gu, David Hammons, Althea Murphy-Price, Paula Santiago. (This course is open to AMST, ART, HIST, and HARC majors, others by waiver) AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST/ENAM 1045 The Graphic Novel and the Postmodern City
From dystopian visions of isolation and alienation to utopian illustrations of soaring towers and integrated communities, comics and graphic novels since the 1970s have represented a range of cityscapes and ways of living in them. Our efforts will focus on understanding how comics work as a cultural form distinct from others and how various artists and writers have imagined urban space in relatively recent U.S. cultural history.  Some texts might include:  Daniel Clowes, Ghost World; Alan Moore and David Lloyd, V for Vendetta; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid on Earth, and G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphono, Ms. Marvel. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)

Anthropology

ANTH 1034 Skull Wars: Sordid True Tales of Rapacity, Revenge, and Racism in the Search for Human Origins
Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. Richard Leakey and Don Johanson. Lee Berger and Tim White. In this course we will examine how jealousy, competition, and racism drive knowledge production and sabotage in the hunt for human ancestors. We’ll do so by exploring how these personalities, and others, have leveraged the media, from the “New York Times” to “National Geographic”, to push forward their vision and status in science. Through scientific articles, popular books, and film, we will also explore how settler colonialism and racism have plagued, and continue to plague, the science of paleoanthropology. SOC (K. Brudvik, visiting winter term instructor)

Mr. Brudvik is a Registered Professional Archaeologist and paleoanthropologist with over 15 years of field and research experience in the United States and Ethiopia. Before moving to Middlebury, he worked in natural and cultural resources management in California, focusing on paleontology and Native American burial protection.

ANTH 1035 Refugees or Labor Migrants: The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to move to high-income countries.  How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on research with international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., as well as African and Mideastern migration to Europe (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1287 or SOAN 1021 or SOAN 329 or ANTH 0329) AAL, AMR, CMP, SOC (D. Stoll)

ANTH 1224 Empowerment or Exploitation? Engaging Communities in the Pursuit of Better Health
Sustained progress in global health and development requires the participation of target communities. Vaccines, for instance, will themselves do no good if caregivers refuse to vaccinate their children. In this course, we will explore the role of communities in the pursuit of improved health – a state often pre-defined by outsiders without direct community consultation. The course will focus specifically on the evolving role of community health workers within global health and development agendas, emphasizing therein the fine line we tread (as global health policy makers, implementers, and donors) between empowering and exploiting the communities on whose participation our success relies. (not open to students who have taken INTD 1224) SOC (H. Napier, visiting winter term instructor)

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (R. Greely, U. Soltan)

ARBC/MSAB 2320M Moroccan Colloquial Arabic (Darija)
In this course the student develops the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. Students will be able to ask questions, understand the responses, express facts, and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include descriptions, guidance, and topics related to the friendship and medical issues. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above-mentioned topics and as a general review but in deep. (ARBC 202) MDE, LNG (A. Guaad, Study Abroad Instructor)

ARBC/MSAB 2320J Jordanian Colloquial Arabic
This course introduces students to colloquial Jordanian Arabic. Units begin with expressions and commonly used vocabulary, moving on to more complex conversations as we explore a variety of daily life topics in Jordan. Students will build fluency through oral practice, listening, studying vocabulary and grammatical structures, and a weekly meeting with Jordanian language partners. Authentic material will enhance the learning experience and broaden students’ cultural knowledge. Students will also get a glimpse of Moroccan Arabic in joint sessions with the course in Morocco. Prerequisite: little or no prior knowledge of ‘Ammiyya and completion of at least two years of Modern Standard Arabic. (ARBC 0202) MDE, LNG (R. AlHindi, Study Abroad Instructor)

Biology

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies. Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period. Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (Open to senior BIOL, ESBI  and MBBC majors, others by waiver) (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course) SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL, (ECON, HARC, JAPN) 1230 Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating meaningful visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, students will attend a combined lecture where they will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will break out into smaller groups to apply these tools to domain-specific research projects in Art History, Biology, Economics, or Japanese and Linguistics.

Students enrolled in Professor Abe’s (Japanese) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create visualizations of social and emotive meanings that surface through Japanese language/culture materials. Participants will use these visualizations to engage in various theoretical and pedagogical topics pertaining to (educational) linguistics. AAL, DED, NOA, SOC

Students enrolled in Professor Allen’s (Biology) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to investigate the drivers of tick abundance and tick-borne disease risk. To do this, students will draw from a nation-wide ecological database. DED, SCI

Students enrolled in Professor Anderson’s (History of Art and Architecture) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings. ART, DED, EUR

Students enrolled in Professor Myers’ (Economics) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create an interactive visualization of the landscape of abortion policy and access in the United States. This visualization will allow users to explore how abortion access varies across the country and how this variation in turn correlated with demographic, health, and economic outcomes. DED, SOC

This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience in statistics, data science, programming, art history, biology, economics, or Japanese is necessary. (S. Abe, D. Allen, C. Anderson, A. Lyford, C. Myers)

Black Studies

BLST/HIST 0462 Histories of Struggle: Middlebury, Town and Gown
In this upper-level seminar, students will examine the historical experiences of Black, PoC, female, LBGTQ, gender non-conforming, and “othered” persons at Middlebury College and in the town, circa 1800-2020. Students will access digital sources housed at Special Collections (Davis Library) and at the Stewart-Swift Research Center (Henry Sheldon Museum) on a range of topics, including race, gender, and sexuality in the contexts of anti-slavery, colonization, eugenics, temperance, women’s rights, and entertainment. Students will receive either BLST or HIST CW credit, for which they will produce 25-page essays. The essays will be archived in Special Collections for use by future researchers. At the conclusion of the course, students will be invited to translate their essays into publicly exhibited Twilight Projects, for which they will receive a small stipend. CW, HIS, SOC (B. Hart, Emeritus Professor of History)

Bill Hart, Emeritus Professor of History, taught a broad range of American History courses at Middlebury College between 1993 and 2020. Bill, the inaugural Director of the Black Studies Program major (2019-20), serves as adviser to The Twilight Project.

BLST/EDST  1002 Make Room: Teaching August Wilson
August Wilson has been hailed as “Theater's Poet of Black America,” yet many students have little exposure to this literary giant. In this course we will explore Wilson’s impressive cycle of 10 plays illustrating 20th century African-American experiences. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading, analyzing, and understanding Wilson’s work, exploring such influences as the blues, visual artist Romare Bearden, and playwright/poet Amiri Baraka. We will also use Critical Race Theory as an analytical tool for understanding Wilson’s significance within the larger context of race relations. AMR, ART, LIT, NOR (T. Affolter)

BLST/INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa. Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum. The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa. This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor. AAL, LNG, SAF (W. Roki, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera is an intellectual entrepreneur and an educator. She was the recipient of the 2010 Carolina Chiron Award for excellent teaching & dedication to students, an award inspired by the late Randy Pausch’s famous last lecture. Gave her own version of a last lecture entitled, “Humanizing the continent of Africa: Demystifying Myths & Stereotypes that Encroach it”. Her writings span diverse fields-The intersection of pathogens and women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, Gender, and African languages

BLST/MSAB 2325Afro-Latinx Geographies in the U.S. and in Latin America
How do ethnic/racial relations, national identity, state violence, immigration, and U.S. policies in Latin America and the Caribbean shape the spatial, economic, and environmental (in)justices affecting Afro-Latinxs? What are commonalities and differences in how Afro-Latinxs and African Americans experience these (in)justices? What does Latinidad mean? How does it travel and is recognized or denied across countries and communities in the Diaspora? How have Black and Brown Latinxs established solidarity among themselves and with white Latinos? This is a project-driven course involving research, self-reflection, interviews, and translating research into creative materials. We will use scholarly, multimedia, film, journalistic, and artistic resources. AMR, SOC (P. Pinto Ferreira Vaz, Study Abroad Instructor)

Chemistry

CHEM 0240 Chemistry of Energy Conversion
With global energy use on the rise, it is essential to understand the different energy systems that are currently in place and how they can, or in many cases, cannot meet the world’s future energy demands in a sustainable manner. In this course we will begin with a brief overview on the energy sources themselves: potential energy (hydro), kinetic energy (wind, tidal), thermal energy (geothermal, ocean thermal), radiant energy (solar), chemical energy (oil, coal, gas, biomass), and nuclear energy (uranium, thorium). Once we understand the energy sources, we will apply the tools of inorganic chemistry (simple bonding, symmetry, transition metal chemistry, ligand field theory, and thermodynamics) to explore the larger topic of energy conversion. We will examine how chemistry provides an incredible opportunity when it comes to understanding energy conversion by approaching the problem from the atomic level all the way up to the empirical macroscopic world. Although the path to sustainable energy will be examined primarily through the lens of chemistry, our learning will be placed in the context of political, social economic and environmental goals, which strongly influence future energy production. (CHEM 104 or CHEM 107) SCI  (A. Vasiliou)

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG K. Wang, C. Wiebe)

CHNS/FMMC 0350 Documentary Film in Contemporary China
In China since the 1980s, new political and socio-economic realities, along with new technologies, created conditions for the emergence of the New Documentary Movement, the collective achievement of a group of artists with new ideas about what the form and function of nonfiction film should be. We will screen and discuss select contemporary Chinese documentary films, place these films in the context of global documentary film history, and learn methods for the analysis of nonfiction film. We will “read” each film closely, and also study secondary sources to learn about the Chinese realities that each film documents. AAL, ART, NOA (T. Moran)

Comparative Literature

CMLT 0200 Once Upon A Time ... Folk Fairy Tales Of The World
Tell me a story! We will examine the complex, inter-connected fairy tale traditions found in every society. Comparing fairy tale variants from around the world-including Japan, China, India, Near East, Africa-we will explore their convoluted and fertile relationships as observed in the rise of fairy tale collections in 15th-century Europe, reaching a culmination in the Brothers Grimm collection, often synonymous with the fairy tale itself. To attain a more dispassionate critical perspective we will explore theoretical approaches to the fairy tales through authors such as Zipes, Bottigheimer, Tatar, and Rölleke, and conclude by examining modern variants in prose, poetry, and film. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1511) CMP, LIT (R. Russi)

Computer Science

CSCI 0390 Spatial Agent-Based Modeling
In this course students will learn efficient data structures and design techniques for spatially-explicit agent-based modeling using the NetLogo programming language. Agent-based modeling techniques will be applied to problems in the social and natural sciences (such as graph pandemic modeling and population dynamics), mathematics and computational sciences (such as graph algorithms), and agent-based games. We will also explore some advanced programming features of NetLogo. Students will design and implement a significant term software project. (CSCI 0201). DED (M. Dickerson)

CSCI 0461 Computer Graphics
Computer graphics is the study of how computers represent, manipulate, and ultimately display visual information. In this course we will focus primarily on three-dimensional graphics, touching on topics such as modeling (meshes, hierarchical models, and transformations), rendering (lighting, texturing, rasterization, and clipping), animation, and GPU programming. We will look at the mathematical foundations of these techniques as well as implementation techniques using WebGL. (CSCI 0202 and MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (P. Caplan)

CSCI 1012 Bias, Belonging, and Power in Technology
Algorithms and big data are informing increasingly important decisions, from hiring to setting bail. While we like to think that computers act objectively, in this class we will examine how technology reflects and often reinforces the biases and power structures of the culture that creates it. Since technology is a reflection of the society that creates it, we will also learn about who has been historically welcomed to or excluded from the spaces where computing technology is made. The course will involve reading, discussion, written reflections, an oral presentation, as well as a coding project that creatively engages with the course topics. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) SOC (S. Kimmel)

CSCI/PHYS 1015 Introduction to Rocket Propulsion
In this course we will investigate the following questions: What is rocket propulsion? How do we send humans and robots to space? How do chemical and electrical rockets work and what applications are they suitable for? How do spacecraft travel to other planets? How can we use computers to design rockets and their trajectories? We will dive into topics including chemical combustion, energy conversion, ionized gases, launch vehicle design and trajectories, Kepler’s Laws, orbit transfers, and much more. We will also read Hidden Figures and have weekly discussions about the text. Assignments will consist of readings, handwritten problem sets, programming assignments, and a short reflection paper on Hidden Figures. (CSCI 101 or CSCI 0145 or CSCI 150, or equivalent and PHYS 109 or equivalent and MATH 0121 or equivalent) SCI (C. Miller)

Dance

DANC 0240 Writing the Body
In this course we will examine the dialogue between the language of the performing body and the written word. Our goals will be to enhance our understanding of the human body through technical practice, experiential anatomy, and ways of writing that respond to and deconstruct the experience of embodiment. Daily technique classes, readings, writings, and performance assignments will encourage a synthesis of personal embodied experience and the words that express that experience. Personal essays, poetry, and several compositional works will culminate in a final performance of works created during the term. ART, PE (K. Borni)

DANC 0380 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest artists as part of the Dance Company to create original performance work. For 2021 this will include performing for virtual events and creating performance happenings on campus. Those receiving credit can expect four to six rehearsals weekly. Appropriate written work, concert and film viewing, and attendance in departmental technique classes are required. This year all interested students can apply by writing a one-page letter of intent to laurelj@middlebury.edu. One credit will be given for each term of participation. Students are required to make a two-semester commitment and must be on campus in the spring. J-Term will focus on research and development, while the spring will focus on creating performances and virtual events. (Open to Freshmen through Seniors, by application.) (DANC 0260; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab ART PE (L. Jenkins)

Economics

ECON, (BIOL, HARC, JAPN) 1230 Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating meaningful visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, students will attend a combined lecture where they will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will break out into smaller groups to apply these tools to domain-specific research projects in Art History, Biology, Economics, or Japanese and Linguistics.

Students enrolled in Professor Abe’s (Japanese) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create visualizations of social and emotive meanings that surface through Japanese language/culture materials. Participants will use these visualizations to engage in various theoretical and pedagogical topics pertaining to (educational) linguistics. AAL, DED, NOA, SOC

Students enrolled in Professor Allen’s (Biology) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to investigate the drivers of tick abundance and tick-borne disease risk. To do this, students will draw from a nation-wide ecological database. DED, SCI

Students enrolled in Professor Anderson’s (History of Art and Architecture) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings. ART, DED, EUR

Students enrolled in Professor Myers’ (Economics) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create an interactive visualization of the landscape of abortion policy and access in the United States. This visualization will allow users to explore how abortion access varies across the country and how this variation in turn correlated with demographic, health, and economic outcomes. DED, SOC

This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience in statistics, data science, programming, art history, biology, economics, or Japanese is necessary. (S. Abe, D. Allen, C. Anderson, A. Lyford, C. Myers)

Education Studies

EDST 0306 Elementary Science Methods
In this course we will investigate children’s scientific understanding and how to design learning experiences to advance their understanding. Working closely with practicing elementary school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing science instruction, conducting assessments, lesson planning, and teaching standards-based lessons. Students will learn to use a claim/evidence/reasoning framework to develop children’s scientific explanations. We will also study recent research in science education and the engineering and design process. Students will gain an understanding of how to plan, implement, and assess science instruction through seminars. Students will also continue to work on their Vermont licensure portfolio. [Open to EDST Elementary Licensure candidates only]. (Approval Required) (A. Johnston)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level.  In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and case studies, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a major in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (Open to EDST Secondary Licensure candidates only) (A. Johnston)

EDST/BLST 1002 Make Room: Teaching August Wilson
August Wilson has been hailed as “Theater's Poet of Black America,” yet many students have little exposure to this literary giant. In this course we will explore Wilson’s impressive cycle of 10 plays illustrating 20th century African-American experiences. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading, analyzing, and understanding Wilson’s work, exploring such influences as the blues, visual artist Romare Bearden, and playwright/poet Amiri Baraka. We will also use Critical Race Theory as an analytical tool for understanding Wilson’s significance within the larger context of race relations. AMR, ART, LIT, NOR (T. Affolter)

EDST 1008 Educational Change and Teachers Strike
From West Virginia to Chicago, teachers – the country’s largest sector of unionized workers – are striking. What are strikes and why do teachers use them? What do they mean for schools and communities? In this course we will examine teachers’ strikes as a way to understand the collisions of race, class, gender, and the state in education. Focusing on episodes of intense friction and controversy, this course will chart liberal, radical, and conservative tendencies in labor and educational history. Using theoretical, historical and contemporary texts about the politics of labor and education, students will critically examine the possibilities and limits for teachers’ organizing. AMR, NOR, SOC (E. Schirmer, visiting winter term instructor)

Eleni Schirmer is a PhD candidate at University of Wisconsin – Madison in Educational Policy Studies. A former co-president of the Teaching Assistants’ Association, the nation’s oldest graduate employee union, her writing has appeared in Dissent, Jacobin, The Progressive, LaborNotes, and espnW.

EDST 1009 Social Justice and Evolutionary Spirituality
In this “course” we will explore whether we can create intellectually dynamic spaces of regeneration and renewal, using Zoom, while enrolled at an historically White supremacist institution. There are two central texts for our inquiry: (1) /Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love and Liberation/ (2016), by The Reverend angel Kyodo Williams, Lama Rod Owens and Jasmine Syedullah, Ph.D. and, (2) /American Awakening: Evolutionary Spirituality, Non-Duality & Free Thinking in the Tradition of American Philosophy/ (2020) by the spiritual philosopher, Jeff Carreira. Class meetings will involve contemplative practices, writing workshops and students will share in the leading of our seminar-based discussions. CW, PHL (J. Miller-Lane)

English and American Literatures

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. While this course is primarily online, on-campus students will have opportunities to meet in person with fellow students and the professor in small groups and during office hours, if circumstances allow. Off-campus students will be accommodated with additional optional online opportunities to connect. 3 hrs. lect. ART (K. Gottshall)

CRWR 1010 Power, Privilege, and Politics in Immersive Journalism
Immersive journalism has perhaps never been more essential, but is full of ethical and practical landmines. How do journalists respectfully tell stories about places unfamiliar to them? How does one engage with vulnerable communities and earn the trust of both sources and readers? In this course we will study journalism ethics and delve into controversies old and new. Readings will include works by Adrienne Nicole Leblanc, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Luis Alberto Urrea, Nikole Hannah-Jones, and Susan Sontag among others. Students will craft a “pitch,” write a profile and be profiled by a classmate, and undertake an ambitious reporting project. By engaging in ethical debate and workshopping assignments, students will emerge as more sophisticated writers and readers of journalism. SOC (S. Crane-Murdoch, L. Markham, visiting winter term instructors)

Lauren Markham ‘05 is the author of The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life, a work of narrative reportage which was awarded the Ridenhour Prize, the California Book Award, and was shortlisted for the LA Times Book Prize. She teaches in the MFA programs at Ashland University and the University of San Francisco, and her writing has appeared in outlets such as The New York Times, Harper’s, Guernica, The Guardian, Orion, The New York Review of Books, and VQR, where she is a Contributing Editor.

Sierra Crane Murdoch ‘10, a journalist and essayist based in the American West, is the author of Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country, which was published by Random House in February of 2020. A recipient of a MacDowell Fellowship and a visiting fellowship in the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley, she has written for Harper’s, The New Yorker online, This American Life, VQR, Orion, The Atlantic, VICE, and High Country News, where she was a former staff writer and a contributing editor.

CRWR/ENVS 1048 Writing Place: Class and Conservation in the American South
In this course we will examine non-traditional conservationists and conservation writing in the American South, with a focus on Georgia and South Carolina. We will read Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood; work about and by Carol Ruckduschel; John McPhee's Encounters with the Archdruid; work about MaVynee Betsch; and J. Drew Lanham's Home Place. We'll engage virtually with practicing southern conservationists, look for the ways scientists and self-taught scientists are leaning into underrepresented spaces, and, through our own writing, investigate meaningful and rich connections to place LIT (M. Mayhew-Bergman)

ENAM 0217 Slam Poetry: Artistry and Politics
In this course, we will examine the artistry, politics, and history of slam poetry through a wide range of spoken word performances on video. In addition to writing short critiques, students will develop drafts for two new (3-minute) spoken word poems for performance, working in small groups and also individually with the professor over Zoom. Poets include the likes of Denice Frohman, Danez Smith, Portia O., Andrea Gibson, Rudy Francisco, Emi Mahmoud, Safia Elhillo, G. Yamazawa, Amir Safi, Rachel Rostad, Hieu Minh Nguyen, Yesika Salgado, Glori B., and Samantha Peterson, among others. Warning: some of the material in this course is explicit, emotionally intense, and disturbing. 3 hrs. lect ART, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 1022 Kafka and his Influence
This course is an intensive inquiry into the work and reach of Franz Kafka. In addition to reading his novels, his stories, his letters and diaries, and his aphorisms, we will take up some of the voluminous and often highly imaginative writings on Kafka, with an eye towards fashioning some ideas, and some writings, of our own. EUR, LIT, PHL (R. Cohen)

ENAM 1040 Poems, Poets, Poetry
In this discussion-based seminar we will read a wide range of lyric, narrative, and multi-media poems and explore diverse ways of responding to them, from the personal to the political. We will contemplate the resources of language, historical and personal contexts, social movements, and ideological commitments upon which poets depend and draw. We will strive to make poetry accessible, relevant, and enjoyable, and to encourage a sense of poems as companions for life. LIT (A. Losano)

ENAM/AMST 1045 The Graphic Novel and the Postmodern City
From dystopian visions of isolation and alienation to utopian illustrations of soaring towers and integrated communities, comics and graphic novels since the 1970s have represented a range of cityscapes and ways of living in them. Our efforts will focus on understanding how comics work as a cultural form distinct from others and how various artists and writers have imagined urban space in relatively recent U.S. cultural history.  Some texts might include:  Daniel Clowes, Ghost World; Alan Moore and David Lloyd, V for Vendetta; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid on Earth, and G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphono, Ms. Marvel. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)

ENAM 1046 Advanced Expository Writing
In this course students will have the opportunity to work intensively to improve the style and impact of their expository (non-fiction) writing. Students will write short daily essays on assigned prompts, culminating in a longer essay on a topic of their choosing. This course is meant for ambitious writers who are confident in their basic composition skills. The course will be conducted asynchronously on Canvas, and students will read a selection of exemplary essays as well as work by their fellow students for inspiration. Each student will meet via Zoom with the professor at least twice per week to discuss their progress. ART, CW (B. Millier)

ENAM/MSAB 2387 Representing Morocco: From Mark Twain to the Beat Generation
Since the mid-nineteenth century, an increasing number of notable American writers, artists, scholars, diplomats and travelers have visited Morocco. Their texts they wrote about the country reveal diverse perceptions of the land, the people and the culture of Morocco. This course is concerned with the politics of representation with a focus on American writing on Morocco. Using a flexible historical framework, this course critically analyses a range of important theoretical works and case studies from the mid-nineteenth century to mid-twentieth century. However, the focus is going to be on the representation of the Moroccan people and places in such narratives. Discussions should evolve around questions such: how did certain political and ideological attitudes inform the construction and reproduction of Western knowledge about Morocco? Why and to what effect did Americans turn to the exotic for inspiration, and what strategies and tactics did they use to translate the foreign into terms that could be understood by their audiences at home? How does a travel narrative and other literary texts represent other people and places? In what ways does ‘fact’ overlap with ‘fiction’ in these narratives? MDE, SOC (N. Bejjit, Study Abroad Instructor)

Environmental Studies

ENVS 1035 The Politics of Hope
We are frequently told we must “never give up hope.” But what is at stake in hoping? In this course we will interrogate this ubiquitous injunction to hope. We will analyze contemporary debates about the possibility of hope in the face of uncertain planetary futures to consider the affective politics of how, in what ways, toward what ends, and why we hope. At what point does hope become misplaced, turning into a “cruel optimism”? How is hope mobilized politically? How are different futurities distributed among different groups? And what might happen if we let go of commonly-held yet narrowly-conceived hopes and tried imagining something different? This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 1047 Contemplative Practice and Social Change
What is the relationship between contemplative practice and social transformation? We will examine the lives and works of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and Joanna Macy. Each of these transformational reformers understood their work to be deeply rooted in spiritual practices of various kinds, reflecting— but often going beyond— the traditions of Hinduism, Protestantism, Catholicism and Buddhism. In each case, our intention will be to investigate closely the relationship between spiritual identity and social reform. We will also develop our own (non-religious) community of practice in order to gain an embodied understanding of the questions we will pursue. This course counts as a humanities cognate for environmental studies majors. (Pass/Fail)  CMP, PHL (R. Gould)

ENVS/CRWR 1048 Writing Place: Class and Conservation in the American South
In this course we will examine non-traditional conservationists and conservation writing in the American South, with a focus on Georgia and South Carolina. We will read Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood; work about and by Carol Ruckduschel; John McPhee's Encounters with the Archdruid; work about MaVynee Betsch; and J. Drew Lanham's Home Place. We'll engage virtually with practicing southern conservationists, look for the ways scientists and self-taught scientists are leaning into underrepresented spaces, and, through our own writing, investigate meaningful and rich connections to place. This course counts as a humanities cognate for environmental studies majors. LIT (M. Mayhew-Bergman)

ENVS/MSAB 2370 Culturally Powered Ecosystems of the World
Escape now from the degradationist myth. Preindustrial civilizations forged ecosystems that continue to yield sustainability to this day. Drawing from examples of silvo-agro-pastoralist Coupled Human and Natural Systems in California, Spain, Argentina, Kenya and Bhutan where the past is not even past we examine the complex feedback loops existing between traditional ecological knowledge, political and economic development, social change and the lasting legacy effects of human interventions in ecosystems. Challenging Enlightenment era cultural framings of linearity and progress these culturally powered ecosystems offer us insights into how to build long lasting landscape resilience with important implications for climate change adaptation. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors.  EUR, SOC (F. Seijo, Study Abroad Instructor)

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 0223 Fan Video: Cultures, Theory, Practice
In this course we will explore the range of fan video forms, aesthetics, cultures, and histories. Fans re-edit pre-existing media (TV, film, etc.) into new transformative works that can receive millions of views as well as critical acclaim. We will study the visual and rhetorical logics of fan video, the distribution and reception circuits for fan video, and the legal and political questions bound up in fan video practices. We will consider fan video as a critical practice, and we will learn by engaging with scholarship on fan video as well as by making our own fan videos. ART (L. Stein)

FMMC/HEBM 0258 Israeli Society Through Films

In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel. (formally HEBM 0250) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

FMMC/CHNS 0350 Documentary Film in Contemporary China
In China since the 1980s, new political and socio-economic realities, along with new technologies, created conditions for the emergence of the New Documentary Movement, the collective achievement of a group of artists with new ideas about what the form and function of nonfiction film should be. We will screen and discuss select contemporary Chinese documentary films, place these films in the context of global documentary film history, and learn methods for the analysis of nonfiction film. We will “read” each film closely, and also study secondary sources to learn about the Chinese realities that each film documents. AAL, ART, NOA (T. Moran)

FMMC 1135 Script Development Workshop
This course is organized in conjunction with the Middlebury Script Lab, a screenwriting residential workshop that brings together emerging screenwriters and established industry professionals. The students will attend screenwriting workshops, masterclasses and informal meetings with visiting writers and producers. Students will explore ideation techniques, finding a story that is appropriate for a feature length script, outlining and pitching. We will discuss dramatic structure in depth and explore the high-concept potential of your screenplay ideas, examining their aesthetic as well as their business possibilities. We will assemble a pitching packet for your projects, including synopsis, logline, mood board and fantasy casting. At the conclusion of this class, you will have a solid outline supported by pitching materials and a clear overview of your material. The class makes an excellent preparation for students who want to take FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II or who plan to write a screenplay for their senior tutorial. (FMMC 0106 or instructor approval) ART (I. Uricaru)

Food Studies

FOOD/MSAB 2327 Regenerative Food Systems: A Local Dialogue with the Global Scale and Cases in Chile
This course departs from the definition of food systems and their cultural, gender, social and economic elements from a local to a global scale. After defining the major problems of the global food systems expressed in local diets and foodscapes homogenization, the course will look at the key elements to study and support the regeneration of local food systems. Finally, it will provide tools to understand and reflect on local food systems based on practical exercises and case studies in the south of Chile. AMR, SOC (C. Monterrubio, Study Abroad Instructor)

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (C. Nunley, L. Sainte-Claire)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

Geography

GEOG 1026 Visualizing Our Future: Using Mapping Charrettes to Support Local Planning

Municipal participation is part of New England culture and considered unique in land management. This participation is oftentimes spirited; the pressure for planners to answer simple questions arising from stakeholder meetings can be daunting. For instance: how well does public transport serve communities of color? Or: where is residential development likely to happen? These inquiries require immediate visualization—but how do we make results understandable to non-experts? In this course we’ll explore spatial questions confronting planners and produce meaningful graphics quickly. Students will encounter diverse, real-world problems in New England and evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of their mapmaking decisions. (GEOG 0120) (B. Hegman and B. Meader, visiting winter term instructor)

Ben was a Geography major, class of ‘10.5, and then worked for two years as the Assistant in Science Instruction with Jeff Howarth and Bill Hegman. He has also worked with Middlebury students as interns for the past two summers, 2018 and 2019. Some of his work has taken him abroad, but since leaving Middlebury Ben has worked mostly in New England with academics, publishers, planners, land trusts, and other organizations. He operates his business Rhumb Line Maps (http://www.rhumblinemaps.com/) in South Bristol, Maine.

German

GRMN 0499 Open Topics Research Seminar
In this seminar students will develop and pursue a research project on a topic of their choice. After reading and discussing research methodology and building research strategies, students will formally present a research proposal to their peers and the department’s professors. The seminar will culminate in each student completing a research paper, translation, or creative project with theoretical underpinnings. Class discussions, presentations, and research papers will be in German. (One course above GRMN300 or by waiver) (F. Feiereisen,N. Eppelsheimer, B. Matthias)

GRMN/MSAB 2350 German Biopics

Biopics, motion pictures based on the life of real, rather than fictional, persons, have become a booming genre in German contemporary cinema. In this course we will explore how film makers choose and develop characters and how they deal with the tension of historical accuracy versus fiction. Students will learn about basic film concepts and terminology in German. We will pay special attention to the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Hannah Arendt (Margarethe von Trotta, 2012) and Gundermann (Andreas Dresen, 2018) are included as two well-known examples of the genre.  (GRMN 201) ART, EUR, LNG (M. Meyer, Study Abroad Instructor)

Greek

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Tzuriel)

HEBM/FMMC 0258 Israeli Society through Films (In English)
In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel.  (formally HEBM 0250) AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

History

HIST/BLST 0462 Histories of Struggle: Middlebury, Town and Gown
In this upper-level seminar, students will examine the historical experiences of Black, PoC, female, LBGTQ, gender non-conforming, and “othered” persons at Middlebury College and in the town, circa 1800-2020. Students will access digital sources housed at Special Collections (Davis Library) and at the Stewart-Swift Research Center (Henry Sheldon Museum) on a range of topics, including race, gender, and sexuality in the contexts of anti-slavery, colonization, eugenics, temperance, women’s rights, and entertainment. Students will receive either BLST or HIST CW credit, for which they will produce 25-page essays. The essays will be archived in Special Collections for use by future researchers. At the conclusion of the course, students will be invited to translate their essays into publicly exhibited Twilight Projects, for which they will receive a small stipend. CW, HIS, SOC (B. Hart, Emeritus Professor of History)

Bill Hart, Emeritus Professor of History, taught a broad range of American History courses at Middlebury College between 1993 and 2020.  Bill, the inaugural Director of the Black Studies Program major (2019-20), serves as adviser to The Twilight Project

 History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design              
introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research.  Students will work to analyze existing buildings and design their own. Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment as well to develop their design-mind to reconcile social-ecological challenges are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (S. Pottorf)

HARC 0258 Art Response to Political Strife: Contemporary Arab Art
In what ways can artists protest war? What are the possibilities for creating art during times of conflict? How do artists respond to the memories of a violent and divisive recent past? These are some of the questions we will examine in this course, with a focus on contemporary artistic practices in the Arab world. Considering a range of media—documentary and experimental film, installation and conceptual practices, painting, photography, and monuments, we will ask how artists living in Beirut, Baghdad, Damascus, Jerusalem, and Algiers are able to confront the traumas of the past, intervene in contemporary socio-political realities, and imagine a different future. (not open to students who have taken INTD 1209) AAL, ART, MDE (S. Rogers)

HARC 0373 AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: Construction Documents
Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, and affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to finalize and generate the construction documentation for the housing unit design generated in HARC 0371 & HARC 0372. A schedule of deliverables with an accompanying set of deadlines will need to be met to allow for construction to start in spring 2021. The studio components include final architectural and constructional detailing; building code compliance; building permitting finalization; physical and CAD modeling; structural coordination; and construction specifications. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (Approval Required) (formerly INTD 0274) (S. Kredell, visiting winter term instructor)

HARC 1026 I'm So Mad I Made This Sign
In an increasingly visual world understanding the constructions intertwining image and text are an essential skill. Graphic design explicitly engages these structures, and in this course we will explore its history and practice through the design of Posters. The poster format offers a variety of challenges for the beginning designer in its uses of direction, narrative, and illustration. Central to the course will be the history and theory of poster design. Putting this history into practice, each student will choose their own topic, research it, and design their own poster. By term’s end each student will have their own 18”x24” poster to be displayed. ART (S. Alavi, visiting winter term instructor)

With an MFA in Design, and a BS in Graphic Design, Sepi Alavi has been designing for 19 years.

HARC, (BIOL, ECON, JAPN) 1230 Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating meaningful visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, students will attend a combined lecture where they will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will break out into smaller groups to apply these tools to domain-specific research projects in Art History, Biology, Economics, or Japanese and Linguistics.

Students enrolled in Professor Abe’s (Japanese) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create visualizations of social and emotive meanings that surface through Japanese language/culture materials. Participants will use these visualizations to engage in various theoretical and pedagogical topics pertaining to (educational) linguistics. AAL, DED, NOA, SOC

Students enrolled in Professor Allen’s (Biology) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to investigate the drivers of tick abundance and tick-borne disease risk. To do this, students will draw from a nation-wide ecological database. DED, SCI

Students enrolled in Professor Anderson’s (History of Art and Architecture) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings. ART, DED, EUR

Students enrolled in Professor Myers’ (Economics) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create an interactive visualization of the landscape of abortion policy and access in the United States. This visualization will allow users to explore how abortion access varies across the country and how this variation in turn correlated with demographic, health, and economic outcomes. DED, SOC

This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience in statistics, data science, programming, art history, biology, economics, or Japanese is necessary. (S. Abe, D. Allen, C. Anderson, A. Lyford, C. Myers)

International and Global Studies

IGST/MSAB 2250 The Politics of Gender in Contemporary North Africa
This course will introduce students to complex questions related to gender identities/roles and gender politics in contemporary North African societies with a particular focus on the Moroccan context. It highlights groundbreaking gender concepts through texts, documentaries, Arts and activism. Students will examine varied topics such as history, religion, culture, education, politics, sexuality, youth, development, globalization, social movements and resistance in order to understand the formation of social hierarchies, privilege and gender inequalities. The course will take a multidisciplinary look at gender within the context of Muslim. SOC (R. Touhtou, Study Abroad Instructor)

IGST/MSAB 2326 Social Movements in Latin America: The case of Chile (taught in Spanish)

The course offers a complete approach to the topic of social movements in the contemporary Latin American context, with a strong emphasis in the case of Chile. In this context, the course looks for to review the historical antecedents of political and social activism in Chile, which is related with the conformation of the main social movements in contemporary in this country. Thus, the student will have the opportunity to understand the main features, for instance, of the feminist and students’ movements, as well as the, the major social movement since October 18th 2019. AMR, SOC (G. Parra, Study Abroad Instructor)

IGST/MSAB 2389 Women prisoners in Stalin's labor camps - from lawlessness to rehabilitation: based on E.S. Ginzburg's memoires
The course is based on E.S. Ginzburg’s memoir “Into the Whirlwind”. The unique feature of this source is that it gives a detailed description of each trial a common USSR citizen would have to undergo in the 1930s – early 1950s once they had been suspected of committing a political crime. Written by a woman, whose fate was much harder than that of male prisoners, it also gives particular attention to the problem of deprivation of the right to have a family and parent your children in the totalitarian Soviet State. EUR, SOC (Y. Bit-Yunan, Study Abroad Instructor)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (J. Pirone, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1026 Can’t we just talk about it? Practicing dialogue in a polarized era
Talking to people who disagree with you is important but uncomfortable.  The goal of this immersive course is to practice having those conversations, and to identify what works and what doesn’t. Students will (1) collectively define a list of topics that they want to talk about, (2) assign background materials for their peers, (3) design formats for dialogue, (4) practice having difficult conversations, and (5) reflect on what works and what doesn’t.  We will explore lessons from restorative circles, structured dialogue, appreciative inquiry, and mediation studies. This credit/no-credit course is led by a mix of students and faculty. SOC (S. Stroup)

INTD 1035 Oratory Symposium
Picture an oratory lab where students use ancient and contemporary rhetorical techniques to sharpen their persuasive writing and speaking skills. In this course co-taught with speaking coach Kate Hilscher ‘20.5, students will read, watch, and listen to great speeches past and present, analyzing what it takes, not just to capture and hold attention, but to move an audience to action. Students will also learn by teaching each other, using practices developed in “Oratory Games & Game Changers: A Peer Coaching Playbook,” authored by Yeaton & Hilscher. Finally, rather than take a final exam, students will produce, emcee and participate in a festival of speaking events: The Oratory Symposium. (D. Yeaton)

INTD 1053 Foundations of Personal Finance
Being equipped with financial knowledge will give you the confidence to make any personal financial decision in life. In this course, we will apply an interdisciplinary approach to personal financial decision-making consisting of consumer and student debt management, retirement security, taxation, and investment management. Simultaneously, we will examine issues of inequality and structural biases inherent in current financial institutions. By way of a final project, students will have the opportunity to present their potential solutions to advance issues of equity. (A. Magri)

INTD 1074 MiddCORE
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, and impact-focused learning.  Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management. Acceptance into MiddCORE is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter. (Pass/Fail; Approval Required) (R. Moeller)

INTD 1077 Rural Decline and the Future of Vermont Public Schools
In this course students will examine how the stresses created by Vermont’s shrinking rural population affect the future planning, governance, and politics regarding local public schools.  Students will conduct research projects to better understand the increasing pressures and realities local districts face regarding such issues as enrollment declines, inequitable distribution of access and resources, increasing student needs, significant facility upgrade or repair needs, community engagement and local control, and state and local property taxes.  By the end of the course, we will have weighed competing interests, collated and compared a wide range of relevant data, and considered some solutions. SOC (A. McGlashan, Director of Academic Outreach and Special Projects CCI)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Middlebury Entrepreneurs is a course for students who want to start their own business or non-profit organization. Students spend the month developing their ideas, building their organizations, and preparing for the culminating event -- pitching their ideas to a panel of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, and industry leaders. Entrepreneurship is a process through which individuals identify opportunities or unmet needs, allocate resources, and create value-adding products or programs. Students will follow the process from ideation to launch quickly and effectively through deliverables, class discussions, and hands-on mentoring both from professors and visiting entrepreneurs and investors. Class will be focused on building a prototype, testing the intended market or target group, and engaging with potential clients or customers. Students should be prepared for hands-on work outside of class time. At the conclusion of the course, students will compete with their classmates in a pitch competition for bragging rights. (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, S. Roach-Gerber, visiting winter term instructors)

As the Vice President at Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies Sam Roach-Gerber consults and coaches hundreds of entrepreneurs each year. Sam started the Female Founders Speaker Series in 2016, created and co-hosts VCET's podcast, Start Here, and serves on the board of Vermont Works for Women and LaunchVT.

David Bradbury is President of the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET) and fund manager of the Vermont Seed Capital Fund, LP in Burlington, Vermont. When not having coffee with entrepreneurs, David is most often found snowboarding, surfing and mountain biking with his family.
 

INTD/BLST 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum. The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa. This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor. AAL, LNG, SAF (W. Roki, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera is an intellectual entrepreneur and an educator. She was the recipient of the 2010 Carolina Chiron Award for excellent teaching & dedication to students, an award inspired by the late Randy Pausch’s famous last lecture. Gave her own version of a last lecture entitled, “Humanizing the continent of Africa: Demystifying Myths & Stereotypes that Encroach it”. Her writings span diverse fields-The intersection of pathogens and women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, Gender, and African languages.

INTD 1196 Introduction to Media and Minorities
In this course we will learn a process for understanding how the media portray minorities. Students will be introduced to techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab that enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how social groups as diverse as immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, and others have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will learn how to download bulk newspaper data from Lexis-Nexis, to process it using python notebooks, and to statistically analyze it using Stata as they work on a concrete project of their choice. DED (E. Bleich)

INTD 1197 Love in Action
In this course we will study the power of love to effect social change. We will review historic and current episodes–including the Civil Rights Movement, post-Apartheid reconciliation in South Africa, and Black Lives Matter–to address longstanding injustice. We will learn from historic (e.g. John Lewis, James Baldwin) and contemporary (e.g., bell hooks) leaders who promote love as a ‘force more powerful’ and also study the limits of love in the pursuit of justice. During the course, members of the college community and external speakers will share their perspectives on the power and limits of love. SOC (J. Isham)

INTD 1208 The International Commodity Business
Civilization has been moving natural resources for commercial purposes for thousands of years. In this course we will study the development of the international commodity trade. The course will look at why humans would move a natural resource from one place to another, addressed through four main areas of inquiry: (1) the innovations which have contributed to global resource trade (commodity extraction, waterborne transport, creation of financial exchanges); (2)  the effects that these commercial imperatives have on developing economies- both positive and negative, with a particular focus on the ‘commodity curse’;  (3)  how the introduction of an imported commodity can fundamentally alter societal behavior; and  (4)  the global economics of commodity markets, commodity indexes around the world, and how commercial developments are continually disrupting societies’ demand habits. SOC (C. Mulliken, visiting winter term instructor)

Christopher Mulliken received his Masters Degree in International Relations and Trade in 1987, and since that time has worked in the international Oil and Gas trading business, in both Trading and Management positions.

INTD 1210 Hindi for Beginners
This course is meant for complete beginners who would like to achieve elementary proficiency in Hindi. It will cover everything necessary for students to be able to make themselves understood in everyday contexts such as introducing themselves, asking for directions, giving and responding to commands, talking about the weather, and more. In addition to learning the structures necessary for basic conversation, students will also learn how to read and write Devanagari, the script used for Hindi. LNG (N. Tiwari, visiting winter term instructor)

 Neha is one of the directors at Zabaan School for Languages in New Delhi. She is in-charge of marketing and student affairs at the institute and also teaches Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit and Persian.

INTD 1227 Inclusive Design and Design Justice in Practice
Inclusive design is intentional, participatory, and iterative design work that supports a range of human diversity, with the goal of counteracting exclusionary, racist, or exploitative designs that pervade our society. In this class, we will learn about inclusive design and design justice through a project-based approach in which students put inclusive design principles into practice in their own project. These inclusive design principles and processes can be broadly applied across industries and design contexts, including but not limited to architectural, technology/UX design, and curriculum design. Our work will be informed by texts including /Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need; Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code; and What Can a Body Do? How We Meet the Built World/. SOC (Pass/Fail) (A. Collier, S. Lohnes-Watulak, visiting winter term instructors)

INTD 1228 Introduction to Medical Ethics and Bioethics
This course will introduce students to the field of bioethics with specific attention to common ethical problems found in the modern practice of medicine. We will start by examining conventional Western bioethical normative claims about the primacy of autonomy, and its relationship to beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. We will use real-world case studies to bring out how genuine bioethical dilemmas consistently force us to confront competing, important human values. Controversial topics may include euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, research, and decision-making for children and incapacitated patients. The course will be faculty led/facilitated but grounded in class discussion and will require students’ close reading of a variety of materials prior to each class. PHL, SOC (S. Sayeed, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1230 Policing the Globe
From the Casbah of Algiers to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, police militarization has become one of the key features of the contemporary security state across much of the world. In order to better grasp this global phenomenon, we will adopt a global historical approach. We will trace the historical origins of police militarization by investigating the rise of modern police forces in the nineteenth century, the history of European colonialism, decolonization, and the Cold War. Finally, we will finish with a study of the contemporary policing of dissent. Students will select a contemporary topic in policing and write a research paper, make a podcast, create a website, or make a documentary video. (not open to students who have taken HIST 1044) CMP, HIS, SOC (A. Prakash)

INTD 1232 Online Extremism: Theory, Research, and Practice
In recent years, the Internet has provided extremists and terrorists revolutionary new ways to organize, radicalize, and recruit in pursuit of their aims. No longer confined to fringe communities, online extremism is a profound issue across every major social network and has played a role in political conflicts across the globe. In the first half of this course, we will explore the growing corpus of academic research on online extremism. In the second half, we will use open-source tools to collect, process, and analyze data on Internet-based extremists. DED, SOC (A. Newhouse, visiting winter term instructor from MIIS)

INTD 1233 Nonprofits & Civil Society
Nonprofit and civil society organizations of all types play a crucial and growing role in the economy.  According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics, there are more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations in the United States today. According to the Global Journal, there are more than 10 million nongovernmental organizations worldwide. As the nonprofit sector has grown in scope and size, both domestically and internationally, the boundaries between for-profit, governmental, and charitable organizations have become intertwined.  In this course we will learn about the economics, history, governance, law, and structure relating to the nonprofit sector (also known as the Third Sector). (T. Nguyen)

INTD 1234 How (Not) to Get Away with Murder: The Investigation and Trial of a Homicide
Det. Danny Reagan is called to investigate the disappearance of a college student last seen at a local, off campus bar.  Suspecting foul play, the Crime Scene Team is called in to assist. Utilizing scientifically accepted techniques and pertinent case law, students will help direct and solve the mystery by viewing and analyzing evidence and determining which steps the investigation should follow. Once a suspect is identified and arrested, students will then prepare their case for trial and the scrutiny of the prosecution and defense teams, ultimately learning if they arrested the right suspect. (P. Bevere, visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Bevere, '96, is a Deputy State’s Attorney with the Addison County State’s Attorney’s Office and have experience handling cases ranging from domestic and sexual assaults to homicides. I have been an attorney for 19 years, with over 13 years of experience as a prosecutor in both Vermont and Massachusetts.

INTD 1238 The Future of U.S. Democracy
America’s democracy faces greater challenges to its functionality, legitimacy, and perhaps continuity than at any time since the Civil War. Anti-racism protests confront entrenched institutions, systemic racism, and legacies of the past. Populist leaders upend longstanding democratic norms and disparage democracy’s foundations. The pandemic threatens public health and the economy. Candidates contest the validity of election procedures, parties engage in voter suppression and disenfranchisement, and conspiracy theories—spread via social media—erode trust. Meanwhile, foreign actors exploit the same social media to sow disinformation and aid candidates of their choice. In this course we consider each of these challenges and debate whether and how they are changing democracy in America. (Pass/Fail) (J. Douglas, B. Johnson, J. Nelson, M. Williams)

INTD 1239 Race, Capitalism, Decolonization
What does decolonization mean in the present context? What does race have to do with capitalism and profit, exploitation and dispossession? In this course we will consider the intersections of race and capitalism in shaping contemporary epistemologies, institutional practices, and lived experiences in local and global contexts. We will consider how present-day formations of race and capitalism are related to histories of imperialism and the global extraction of labor and resources. (Pass/Fail) (H. Gupta, M. Rohena-Madrazo, J. Ortegren, E. Oxfeld, Y. Sidiqqi)

INTD 1241 A History of the American Musical
Beginning with overtly racist minstrel shows of the 1840s, musical comedy has drawn freely from European, Black, Jewish and Hispanic cultures, forging something new and uniquely American. A study of the musical is a study of nearly two centuries of American social history, as the musical reflects and amplifies the political, racial and sexual attitudes of its day. We will encounter the masters of American popular music, from Irving Berlin through George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Stephen Sondheim and Lin-Manuel Miranda, and will study footage of the great stars and showpieces of the musical stage. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (D. Anderson, visiting winter term instructor)

Douglas Anderson is artistic director of Town Hall Theater and directs the annual Winter Term Musical, a decades-old collaboration between Middlebury College and THT.  He has directed over 50 musicals and is the founder and artistic director of Opera Company of Middlebury, now in its 17th season. 

INTD 1242 Carbonomics and Renewable Energy at Middlebury College
What is the cycle of carbon from its generation to its exchange on the market? What are the environmental, social, and equity impacts associated with renewable energy projects and assets? How does Middlebury generate, manage, and monitor its growing and increasingly complex portfolio of renewables to reach carbon neutrality? We will explore these questions through lectures and group projects. By the end of this course students will be able to propose ways to optimize the management of Middlebury’s portfolio with an understanding of its relationship to financial, equity, and environmental considerations. (J. Byrne, A. Vaccari, F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 1243 Climate Change, Climate Justice: An Essential Conversation
The iron law of climate change is: the less you did to cause it, the quicker and harder it hits you.  That’s one reason why, over recent years, the U.S. and global climate movements have increasingly morphed into climate justice movements. And it’s why those communities that are hardest hit are in the forefront of the fight for change. This course will focus on how we understand and measure climate impacts, what a fair response to the climate crisis might look like, and how activists and scientists are working to achieve those goals. This course will provide participants with greater capacity to evaluate and advance climate justice efforts. This course will be centered around a diverse group of people living and leading on climate justice issues in communities across the globe, for example: Cancer Alley residents, Black Lives Matter representatives, Sunrise Movement and other youth activists, Indigenous Peoples, Pacific Islanders and African populations at risk of flooding and others. It will be facilitated and supported by B. McKibben, M. Brown, B. Vitek, S. Esser-Calvi, K. Gagne, visiting winter term instructor,  E. Fillion and J. Byrne. (pass/fail)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, S. Mula)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (S. Abe, K. Davis)

JAPN, (BIOL, ECON, HARC,) 1230 Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating meaningful visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, students will attend a combined lecture where they will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will break out into smaller groups to apply these tools to domain-specific research projects in Art History, Biology, Economics, or Japanese and Linguistics.

Students enrolled in Professor Abe’s (Japanese) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create visualizations of social and emotive meanings that surface through Japanese language/culture materials. Participants will use these visualizations to engage in various theoretical and pedagogical topics pertaining to (educational) linguistics. AAL, DED, NOA, SOC

Students enrolled in Professor Allen’s (Biology) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to investigate the drivers of tick abundance and tick-borne disease risk. To do this, students will draw from a nation-wide ecological database. DED, SCI

Students enrolled in Professor Anderson’s (History of Art and Architecture) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings. ART, DED, EUR

Students enrolled in Professor Myers’ (Economics) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create an interactive visualization of the landscape of abortion policy and access in the United States. This visualization will allow users to explore how abortion access varies across the country and how this variation in turn correlated with demographic, health, and economic outcomes. DED, SOC

This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience in statistics, data science, programming, art history, biology, economics, or Japanese is necessary. (S. Abe, D. Allen, C. Anderson, A. Lyford, C. Myers)

LATIN

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I
The course offers an intensive introduction to the Latin language that prepares students to read the major authors of ancient Roman literature. In addition to their systematic study of grammar and syntax, students translate excerpts from Vergil, Seneca and the Vulgate Bible. This course is designed for students who have had no previous experience with Latin, as well as those who have had some Latin but want to review the fundamentals of grammar. LNG (J. Chaplin, R. Ganiban)

Linguistics

LNGT 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor. Not open to students who have taken LNGT 1001. (K. Hanta, visiting winter term instructor)

A translator and writer with 25 years of experience, Karin Hanta, Director of the Feminist Resource Center at Chellis House, also holds a PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Vienna

 

Luso Hispanic Studies

Middlebury Study Abroad


MSAB/IGST 2250 The Politics of Gender in Contemporary North Africa
This course will introduce students to complex questions related to gender identities/roles and gender politics in contemporary North African societies with a particular focus on the Moroccan context. It highlights groundbreaking gender concepts through texts, documentaries, Arts and activism. Students will examine varied topics such as history, religion, culture, education, politics, sexuality, youth, development, globalization, social movements and resistance in order to understand the formation of social hierarchies, privilege and gender inequalities. The course will take a multidisciplinary look at gender within the context of Muslim. SOC (R. Touhtou, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/ARBC 2320M Moroccan Colloquial Arabic (Darija)
In this course the student develops the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. Students will be able to ask questions, understand the responses, express facts, and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include descriptions, guidance, and topics related to the friendship and medical issues. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above-mentioned topics and as a general review but in deep. (ARBC 202) MDE, LNG (A. Guaad, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/ARBC 2320J Jordanian Colloquial Arabic
This course introduces students to colloquial Jordanian Arabic. Units begin with expressions and commonly used vocabulary, moving on to more complex conversations as we explore a variety of daily life topics in Jordan. Students will build fluency through oral practice, listening, studying vocabulary and grammatical structures, and a weekly meeting with Jordanian language partners. Authentic material will enhance the learning experience and broaden students’ cultural knowledge. Students will also get a glimpse of Moroccan Arabic in joint sessions with the course in Morocco. Prerequisite: little or no prior knowledge of ‘Ammiyya and completion of at least two years of Modern Standard Arabic. (ARBC 0202) MDE, LNG (R. AlHindi, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/BLST 2325Afro-Latinx Geographies in the U.S. and in Latin America
How do ethnic/racial relations, national identity, state violence, immigration, and U.S. policies in Latin America and the Caribbean shape the spatial, economic, and environmental (in)justices affecting Afro-Latinxs? What are commonalities and differences in how Afro-Latinxs and African Americans experience these (in)justices? What does Latinidad mean? How does it travel and is recognized or denied across countries and communities in the Diaspora? How have Black and Brown Latinxs established solidarity among themselves and with white Latinos? This is a project-driven course involving research, self-reflection, interviews, and translating research into creative materials. We will use scholarly, multimedia, film, journalistic, and artistic resources. AMR, SOC (P. Pinto Ferreira Vaz, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/IGST 2326 Social Movements in Latin America: The case of Chile (taught in Spanish)
The course offers a complete approach to the topic of social movements in the contemporary Latin American context, with a strong emphasis in the case of Chile. In this context, the course looks for to review the historical antecedents of political and social activism in Chile, which is related with the conformation of the main social movements in contemporary in this country. Thus, the student will have the opportunity to understand the main features, for instance, of the feminist and students’ movements, as well as the, the major social movement since October 18th 2019. AMR, SOC (G. Parra, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/FOOD 2327 Regenerative Food Systems: A Local Dialogue with the Global Scale and Cases in Chile
This course departs from the definition of food systems and their cultural, gender, social and economic elements from a local to a global scale. After defining the major problems of the global food systems expressed in local diets and foodscapes homogenization, the course will look at the key elements to study and support the regeneration of local food systems. Finally, it will provide tools to understand and reflect on local food systems based on practical exercises and case studies in the south of Chile. AMR, SOC (C. Monterrubio, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/GRMN 2350 German Biopics
 Biopics, motion pictures based on the life of real, rather than fictional, persons, have become a booming genre in German contemporary cinema. In this course we will explore how film makers choose and develop characters and how they deal with the tension of historical accuracy versus fiction. Students will learn about basic film concepts and terminology in German. We will pay special attention to the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Hannah Arendt (Margarethe von Trotta, 2012) and Gundermann (Andreas Dresen, 2018) are included as two well-known examples of the genre. (GRMN 201) ART, EUR, LNG (M. Meyer, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/ENVS 2370 Culturally Powered Ecosystems of the World
Escape now from the degradationist myth. Preindustrial civilizations forged ecosystems that continue to yield sustainability to this day. Drawing from examples of silvo-agro-pastoralist Coupled Human and Natural Systems in California, Spain, Argentina, Kenya and Bhutan where the past is not even past we examine the complex feedback loops existing between traditional ecological knowledge, political and economic development, social change and the lasting legacy effects of human interventions in ecosystems. Challenging Enlightenment era cultural framings of linearity and progress these culturally powered ecosystems offer us insights into how to build long lasting landscape resilience with important implications for climate change adaptation. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors.  EUR, SOC (F. Seijo, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/ENAM 2387 Representing Morocco: From Mark Twain to the Beat Generation
Since the mid-nineteenth century, an increasing number of notable American writers, artists, scholars, diplomats and travelers have visited Morocco. Their texts they wrote about the country reveal diverse perceptions of the land, the people and the culture of Morocco. This course is concerned with the politics of representation with a focus on American writing on Morocco. Using a flexible historical framework, this course critically analyses a range of important theoretical works and case studies from the mid-nineteenth century to mid-twentieth century. However, the focus is going to be on the representation of the Moroccan people and places in such narratives. Discussions should evolve around questions such: how did certain political and ideological attitudes inform the construction and reproduction of Western knowledge about Morocco? Why and to what effect did Americans turn to the exotic for inspiration, and what strategies and tactics did they use to translate the foreign into terms that could be understood by their audiences at home? How does a travel narrative and other literary texts represent other people and places? In what ways does ‘fact’ overlap with ‘fiction’ in these narratives? MDE, SOC (N. Bejjit, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB/IGST 2389 Women prisoners in Stalin's labor camps - from lawlessness to rehabilitation: based on E.S. Ginzburg's memoires
The course is based on E.S. Ginzburg’s memoir “Into the Whirlwind”. The unique feature of this source is that it gives a detailed description of each trial a common USSR citizen would have to undergo in the 1930s – early 1950s once they had been suspected of committing a political crime. Written by a woman, whose fate was much harder than that of male prisoners, it also gives particular attention to the problem of deprivation of the right to have a family and parent your children in the totalitarian Soviet State. EUR, SOC (Y. Bit-Yunan, Study Abroad Instructor)

MSAB 2400 Schools Abroad Internship
A credit-bearing experiential learning remote course offered from Middlebury Schools Abroad.  Depending on location and placement, this would be in English or the host country language.  This course aims to help students gain in-depth knowledge and exposure to a foreign culture and its work environment, including culturally appropriate professional communication skills, and in the case of placements in a foreign language improve students’ foreign language skills. The experience will culminate in a formal academic paper under the supervision of the School Abroad Director. For spring 2021, a limited number of remote internships are available in Brazil, Cameroon, Chile, China, France, Germany, Japan, and Morocco.  Students must have completed the prerequisite language course for study abroad.  Students can only receive one credit for internships at the Schools Abroad.  Students who have already participated in a Schools Abroad internship in a previous semester or plan on pursuing an internship at a School Abroad in the future are not allowed to enroll in this course.  (S. Lorenso Castro, J. Ngabeu, J. Pastene, K. Zhang, A. Tondu, H. Fahrenberg, S. Eda, S. Jaafar, Study Abroad Instructors)

Music

MUSC 1008 Bob Dylan's America
Few figures in American music have had the far-ranging influence of Bob Dylan, who, willingly or not, personified the social turmoil of the 1960s. In this course we will examine the musical and literary traditions on which Dylan draws (rock 'n' roll, country music, the urban folk revival, and the Beat poets), assess his art of crafting songs, and survey the principal phases of his career. Drawing on a range of biographical and historical materials, we will also consider the relationship between the social movements of the post-1960s and the carefully crafted public persona that Robert Zimmerman named Bob Dylan. AMR, ART, NOR (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 1028 Live Code: Computer Programming as Musical Performance
In this course we will learn the art of live coding, an electronic music improvisation/performance practice in which the computer programmer creates music in real time. Live coding is an excellent introduction to computer programming for beginners, and also offers opportunities for more advanced programmers. Students will learn the techniques of live coding, basics of sound design and acoustics, and fundamentals of music theory. Class activities will include solo and group performances, research projects, and class presentations. All students will need a laptop computer (Windows or Mac) with a reasonable amount of free disc space. No experience required. ART (P. Hamlin, Emeritus Professor of Music)

Philosophy

PHIL 0316 Philosophy of Science
Science raises several philosophical issues. These include epistemological issues about scientific practices such as theory construction, explanation, confirmation, experimentation, modeling, and measurement. They also include metaphysical issues about causation, laws of nature, reductionism, dispositions, chance, space, and time. Finally, specific sciences—from fundamental physics to the social sciences—raise unique philosophical puzzles. We will examine a small subset of these topics in depth. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver. PHL (K. Khalifa)

Phyiscs

PHYS 0230 Computational Physics
The laws of physics provide a beautiful mathematical framework for describing the universe. Yet it’s rare that exact solutions to the resulting equations can be found with pen and paper. In this course we will explore a range of powerful computational methods that allow us to solve physical problems, primarily using the Python programming language. Applications of these methods will include problems in Newtonian mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical and thermal physics, quantum mechanics, and relativity. No prior experience with programming is required. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122) DED, SCI (C. Herdman, P. Hess)

PHYS/CSCI 1015 Introduction to Rocket Propulsion

In this course we will investigate the following questions: What is rocket propulsion? How do we send humans and robots to space? How do chemical and electrical rockets work and what applications are they suitable for? How do spacecraft travel to other planets? How can we use computers to design rockets and their trajectories? We will dive into topics including chemical combustion, energy conversion, ionized gases, launch vehicle design and trajectories, Kepler’s Laws, orbit transfers, and much more. We will also read Hidden Figures and have weekly discussions about the text. Assignments will consist of readings, handwritten problem sets, programming assignments, and a short reflection paper on Hidden Figures. (CSCI 101 or CSCI 0145 or CSCI 150, or equivalent and PHYS 109 or equivalent and MATH 0121 or equivalent) SCI (C. Miller)

PHYS 1103 Picture a Physicist

Picture a physicist. Whom do you see? In this course we will learn about the pioneering physics research done by women, African Americans, and members of other groups that are underrepresented in physics. Through in-class demonstrations and simulations, students will understand the many physics questions that would never have been answered without a diverse group of physicists working to solve them. Students will read about the lives and struggles of these physicists and will examine the hidden and overt obstacles that can hinder their persistence in the field. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary nor expected. (FYSE 1548 students require permission of the instructor.) SCI (M. Durst)

PHYS 1108 Quantum Mechanics from Linear Algebra
The mysterious and surprising predictions of quantum mechanics, such as uncertainty in measurement and the failure of determinism, can be best understood through the language of linear algebra. In this course we will use eigenvectors and eigenvalues, dot products, and the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality to develop the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics and their predictions for the behavior of quantum systems.  We will focus particularly on spin systems, which have applications to areas ranging from quantum computing to magnetic resonance imaging to quaternion methods for 3-D graphics and motion tracking. No prior physics experience is assumed apart from basic familiarity with concepts such as momentum, energy, and electric charge.  (Prerequisites:  MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and introductory physics at the high school or college level.) DED, SCI
(N. Graham)

Political Science

PSCI 1003 Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we’ll examine the history, current status and future of US-European relations, focusing on transatlantic security issues. The learning process will be entirely virtual and will include lectures, class discussions, a role-playing exercise and a final policy paper. Issues covered include: persistent and changing aspects of the “transatlantic bargain;” US-European relations during the Trump administration and its prospects during the Biden presidency; relations with Russia and China; the Iranian nuclear deal as a transatlantic issue; NATO enlargement issues;  relations between NATO and the European Union; British exit from the EU (Brexit); and alternative futures for transatlantic relations. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, EUR, SOC (S. Sloan, visiting winter term instructor)

 Stan Sloan, a former senior U.S. government intelligence, foreign and defense policy expert and research manager, has for the past 16 years taught courses on Euro-Atlantic Relations and American Power in the Middlebury Winter Term. He is the author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, book chapters and books, including Defense of the West: Transatlantic Security from Truman to Trump (2020) and Transatlantic traumas: Has illiberalism brought the West to the brink of collapse? (2018).


PSCI 1031 Protest Music in Comparative Perspective
In this course we will examine how marginalized populations around the world use music to interpret, explain, and respond to political, racial, socioeconomic, and gendered inequities. Because music is produced for a wide audience, it is important for the construction of group identity and a useful means of protest. We will discuss the domestic politics of countries such as Nigeria, Jamaica, the U.S., and Brazil by reading the literature of comparative politics, sociology, and critical race and gender theory. Our discussion of these topics will help us better understand how power in various forms is used to repress, and how music challenges existing hegemonies. (Comparative Politics) AAL, ART, CMP, SOC (K. Fuentes George)

PSCI 1041 Contemporary Conflicts in the Middle East
The Middle East is known to be one of the most conflict-ridden regions of the world. In this course we explore the contemporary conflicts in the region and the basic motivation of major actors. Specifically, we will study the rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the war in Syria and Yemen. We will study the causes and consequences of these conflicts at the regional and global level. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) AAL, MDE, SOC (S.  Gumuscu)

PSCI/PSYC 1048 Social Change to Address Systemic Challenges
In this course we will examine different methods to enact social change around systemic challenges such as climate, poverty, and racism. We will evaluate lobbying, protest, public opinion campaigns, psychology of communication outreach, training seminars, behavioral nudges, etc, to determine when and how these efforts are successful.  Through this process we will wrestle with the current debate on how to coordinate and scale individual efforts to realize durable, large-scale change. In addition to the course content, students will advance a social change project (in groups) with instructor mentoring. This effort will be digitally based and supported by skill-building workshops from experts and mentors (instructors approval needed for registration). (Pass/Fail) SOC (J. Teets, M. McCauley, M. Brown)

PSCI 1159 Weapons of Mass Destruction
Technological development has brought human civilization to the point at which we can destroy ourselves in a matter of hours using weapons of mass destruction. What effects do these weapons have on political, and social behavior? Do WMDs deserve their own classification, or is human behavior consistent regardless of the weapon? We explore the technology, political theory and policy that has risen around the prospect of human annihilation. (not open to students who have taken PSCI 0242 or equivalent) (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (A. Yuen)

Psychology

PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) SOC (M. Kimble)

PSYC/PSCI 1048 Social Change to Address Systemic Challenges
In this course we will examine different methods to enact social change around systemic challenges such as climate, poverty, and racism. We will evaluate lobbying, protest, public opinion campaigns, psychology of communication outreach, training seminars, behavioral nudges, etc, to determine when and how these efforts are successful.  Through this process we will wrestle with the current debate on how to coordinate and scale individual efforts to realize durable, large-scale change. In addition to the course content, students will advance a social change project (in groups) with instructor mentoring. This effort will be digitally based and supported by skill-building workshops from experts and mentors (instructors approval needed for registration). (Pass/Fail) SOC (J. Teets, M. McCauley, M. Brown)

Religion

RELI 0298 Privilege and Poverty: The Ethics of Economic Inequality
In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality. Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality. We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” PHL (J. Davis)

RELI 1074 Buddhism in the Modern World
In this course we will survey and analyze Buddhist traditions around the world, from the mid-19th century to the present. We will begin by examining traditional Buddhist cultures in Asia—their teachings, practices, and social and political organizations—and then analyze how they have variously responded to the challenges of colonialism, nationalism, science, individualism, and democracy. We will examine how these led to the assumptions underlying ‘Buddhist Modernism’ both in Asia and the West. Materials will include texts and films on traditional Buddhism, historical, social, and intellectual analyses of its transformations, as well as narratives of individuals’ lives. CMP, PHL (B. Waldron)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (M. Walker, and N. Tsikhelashvil, M. Volchkecvich, Study Abroad Instructors)

Sociology

SOCI 0364 Documentary Sociology
In this course we will consider how documentaries can bring the “sociological imagination” to life by using video and audio to link individual troubles with social issues and personal biography with historical context. Through readings and viewings, we will spend the first third of the class discussing the potential and limitations of the documentary form to illustrate sociological concepts. Students will develop a proposal for their own short video or audio documentary that they will then work on throughout the semester. Students must be willing to spend significant time outside of class on their documentary and to provide constructive feedback on each other’s developing projects in class. The course will culminate in a public presentation of the finished projects. No prior experience or coursework in video or audio production is required. SOC (R. Tiger)

Studio Art

ART 0302 The Art of Pastel Painting
In this class we will study and apply principles of making images using the medium of dry pastels. Pastel-painting involves sticks of dry pigment bound with gum-arabic and applied by the artist’s hand to paper. Used skillfully it is intense, direct, and expressive. Using pastels we will learn color theory and how to control value and perspective by creating images of still-life, interiors, and the human figure. This studio course will also include image-lectures on the history of pastel in art history. (ART 0157 or ART 0159 or ART 0185 or ART 1128 or ART 1129 or THEA 0101). There will be a required purchase of materials. ART (J. Butler)

Theatre

THEA 1219 Discovering the Clown In this physical theatre course students will discover the joy of being on stage and screen, develop a personal relationship with the comic world, and find pleasure in a direct engagement with an audience. The study of theatrical clown helps connect students to the spontaneous, vulnerable, and generous impulses of their work. Through games, improvisation, individual and group exercises, personal writing, performance assignments, and readings we will create a supportive ensemble to encourage each student to succeed in their unique way. This is a screen-on-move-around-get-loud kind of class. ART (J. Proctor, visiting winter term instructor)

Julia Proctor is an actor, the founder and director of Clown Gym, a maker of devised theatrical work, and an educator. She is a graduate of Middlebury College, has an MFA in Classical Acting from GWU, and has studied with some of the most prestigious clown teachers in the world.   

THEA 1236 Introduction to Corsetry
In this course students will build one basic corset. A corset is a good gateway sewing project because it utilizes relatively simple sewing skills to achieve an end product with “wow” effect. Skills covered: commercial paper pattern use and alteration, basic sewing, setting grommets, and fitting. A history of the corset is included. Because we are remote, beginning machine sewing experience is required. Also, must have access to sewing machine, iron, and ironing board plus basic sewing tools. Each student will be required to purchase materials totaling approximately $90. ART (C. Wood, visiting winter term instructor)

Carol Wood has been wearing corsets and teaching corset making for over 25 years. She is a professional pattern maker, costume historian, and since 2019 the Costume Shop Director in Middlebury College's Department of Theatre.

THEA 1237 Stage to Screen: African American Plays
In Stage to Screen, we will explore how stage plays by African-American playwrights are transformed into films. Playwriting and screenwriting are closely related forms of dramatic writing; students will read 8 plays and examine the differences between each play and its film adaptation. Since this course deals with the black experience, students will investigate the socio-historical and political contexts of the play to see how the intersection of race, class, gender, culture, and politics play a role in the artistic product. Students will evaluate whether each playwright’s vision is reaffirmed, enhanced, or challenged in the transformation of play to film. AMR, ART, NOR (N. Nesmith, visiting winter term instructor)

Nathaniel Graham Nesmith is a theatre scholar who specializes in 20th- and 21st-century American drama; he has done extensive research on African American theatre, Civil Rights Era plays, and the representation of crime and the criminal justice system in contemporary American plays. He holds an M.F.A. in playwriting and a Ph.D. in theatre from Columbia University. In AY 2014-2015 and 2015-2016, he was a Creating Connections Consortium Postdoctoral Fellow at Middlebury College.

Writing Program

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.