Winter Term 2019

 

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WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
  
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Interdepartmental 
    Linguistics
    Writing Program
 

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German
   Latin
   Hebrew
   Spanish & Portuguese
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Education Studies
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology/Anthropology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
  

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Physics

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


American Studies

AMST 1012 Hollywood’s West: The American West on Film
From its beginnings the Hollywood western has presented an imaginative geography, a powerful popular fantasy expressing deep truths, and perhaps still deeper desires about American identity.  Initially the western reasserted 19th century America’s optimistic vision of manifest destiny; ultimately, many westerns challenged that optimism, often explicitly presenting racial, sexual, and political tensions. Over time, westerns have been re-defined, re-invented and expanded, dismissed, re-discovered, and spoofed. Working with a broad range of films, including Stagecoach, High Noon, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid Unforgiven, Lone Star, Blazing Saddles—and perhaps even Cowboys vs. Aliens—we will explore the ways in which westerns have both shaped and reflected the dominant social and political desires and anxieties of their respective eras. ART, AMR, NOR (D. Evans)

AMST 1016 Segregation in America: Baseball and Race
This course examines the African-American contribution to the National Pastime. Organized baseball was segregated, black and white, from the end of the 19th century to the mid-20th century. Within segregated black communities, amid the debilitating effects of a separate and unequal world, a rich culture emerged and an absorbing chronicle was written. We will learn about life in baseball's "Negro leagues," and the great black players and teams, and consider how this sporting phenomenon reflects American values and history. AMR, HIS, NOR  (K. Lindholm)

Karl Lindholm Ph.D is the Dean of Advising Emeritus/Ass’t Professor of American Literature at Middlebury. He has written widely on baseball subjects and retired from full-time work at Middlebury in 2011.  He was Faculty Head or Dean in all five Commons.

AMST 1020 Asian American Food Studies
In this course we will discuss how food shapes a sense of belonging and identity in Asian America. Going beyond how Asian American cultures are consumed through food items and restaurants, we will focus on how Asian Americans have defined themselves through food. Required readings will engage questions about the production, circulation, and consumption of food. We will critically engage the genres of memoir, recipe books, fiction, historical accounts, cultural criticism, and food criticism as we write pieces in each of these styles. There will also be a limited amount of cooking involved in the course. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (R. Joo)

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (S. Liebhaber)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145;  Open to BIOL majors or by waiver.) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0330 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
In this course we will explore how microbial pathogens colonize, invade, and persist in host organisms to cause disease.  Microbial pathogens include viruses, bacteria, and single-celled eukaryotic organisms that express virulence factors to potentiate disease in a resident host.  In our consideration of this dynamic interaction we will pay particular attention to the host response to infection and how microbes exploit that response to become parasitic.  Successful human pathogens to be studied will include bacteria (Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Salmonella, Mycobacteria, Borrelia, Listeria, and Helicobacter), fungi (Candida and Cryptococcus), protists (Plasmodium and Toxoplasma), and viruses (HIV, SARS, Ebola, Zika).  Investigating the mechanism(s) that control virulence gene expression can promote our understanding of the processes that render these and other microorganisms pathogenic, and so foster the development of effective treatment strategies aimed at controlling and/or preventing disease.  (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) SCI   (G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0371 Advanced Field Biology: Place-based Global Biology Education
In this biology research course, we will conduct field-based scientific observation, sample and data collection, and interpretation of biological phenomena in coral reef environments on Abaco Island, Bahamas. Students will be deeply engaged in off-campus, place-based learning practicing population genetics, ecology, genomics, biogeochemistry, and site mapping via Rapid Ecological Assessment (REA) protocols. The course is approximately two weeks off-campus (travel costs covered) and two weeks on-campus conducting group research projects integrating field observations with laboratory analysis. Data and samples will be collected while diving and snorkeling in Abaco (dive training available, costs covered) and analyzed both in Abaco and at Middlebury.  This work will contribute to ongoing active reef research with global reef conservation implications. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0140 and a 300-level BIOL class with laboratory or waiver. Instructor approval required; BIOL major or by waiver). (E. Eggleston, S. Trombulak, J. Ward)

BIOL 0490 Seminar in Plant Ecology
Global climate change has led to a huge effort to collect data on the state of the planet, including measurements of temperature, atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, and species distributions and phenologies. Ecologists have never had access to such quantities of data, and thus need new methods for their description and analysis. In this course we will explore how to use statistical models to make sense of these data: how to develop, choose, and fit the best model for a particular data set. The course will be project-based, culminate in an independent project, and use the statistical software, R. (BIOL 0140 and one statistics course required, no R experience required.)  (D. Allen)

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (T. Moran,  K. Wang, X. Zhang, Y, Zhang)

CHNS 1002 Modern Chinese Spoken Drama: Page and Stage
In this course we will read selected works of spoken drama (huaju) and discuss the historical, cultural and aesthetic conditions out of which this modern Chinese theatrical form developed. As we study the history of huaju and read representative texts, we will also rehearse and perform a short Chinese play. This course is for students of Mandarin who have completed CHNS 0201 or above. Discussion will be in Chinese and English; readings and written work may be done in either language; the play will be performed in both. (CHNS 0201 or approval of the instructor.) AAL, ART, NOA (B. Qian, visiting winter term instructor)

B. Qian teaches at the C.V. Starr Middlebury School in China, Beijing. He has a B.A. in Chinese Literature, a M.A. in International Chinese Education, and experience writing, directing and acting in spoken drama.

 

Comparative Literature

CMLT/PHIL 1020 Modern Philosophy & Literature
In this course, focused on close, intensive readings of key texts, we will explore the border that both separates and joins philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning?  We will explore philosophical literature and literary philosophy in 20th Century works, mainly European and North American, on topics such as: style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Morrison, and Woolf. Philosophical readings will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Nussbaum and Ricoeur. (Previous course in PHIL or CMLT or waiver) (Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 0286) EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Woodruff)

Computer Science

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 1007 Practical Analysis of a Personal Genome
In this hands-on laboratory-style course, we will analyze a human genome starting from the raw sequencing data (publicly available). Using databases, scientific literature and other resources, students will formulate hypotheses about that person’s ancestry, physical traits, and disease susceptibility based on the genomic data. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to describe the science underlying human genome analysis, employ and interpret the results of bioinformatics software tools, and debate the ethical, legal and social implications of personal genomics. No biology background is assumed, but students are expected to be able to use command-line software tools. (CSCI 101 or CSCI 150)  (M. Linderman)

Dance

ARDV 0117 Culture as Creative Process
This course is designed for students from a broad range of backgrounds and academic disciplines who are interested in developing their unique creative process, researching their cultural history, and creating and revising performance projects that reflect the intersection of the two. Improvisatory tools and guided imagery provide methods for developing creative work. Weekly workshops in movement from the African diaspora, regular journaling, work-in-progress showings, and feedback sessions add further depth. Students will also generate a bibliography relating to their cultural history and present the results of their research in written form. (This course can count for dance and theatre majors as ARDV 0116). (Not open to students who have taken DANC 1005 or ARDV 0116). ART (D. Brown)

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can expect daily rehearsals plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval Required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (L. Winfield)

Education Studies

EDST/CRWR 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision.  3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Cooper)

EDST 0227 JusTalks at Middlebury
In this course students will develop the ability to facilitate the JusTalks First-Year Forums that will take place during winter term and spring semester. The First Year Forums are intended to (i) foster the habits of listening empathically and responding constructively when engaging in complex discussions that address topics such as privilege and difference, and (ii) develop greater awareness of how to contribute actively to building an inclusive community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students will develop in this course are consciously intended to be transferable to other settings and transformative for the Middlebury community. (Approval Required) SOC (J. Miller-Lane, J. Sanchez)

EDST 0306 Elementary Science Methods
In this course we will investigate children’s scientific understanding and how to design learning experiences to advance their understanding. Students will learn to use a claim/evidence/reasoning framework to develop children’s scientific explanations.  We will also study recent research in science education and the engineering and design process.  Activities will include observing science instruction, conducting assessments, lesson planning, and teaching standards-based lessons. Students will gain an understanding of how to plan, implement, and assess science instruction through class and field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week).  Students will also collect evidence and write an entry for their Vermont licensure portfolio. (Approval Required) (T. Weston)

EDST 1006 Contemplative Education: The Art and Science of Mindful Learning
There is compelling research in the fields of education, psychology, neuroscience and cognitive science that suggests a positive correlation between contemplative practices and the intellectual, emotional and psychological growth of students.  In this course we will consider the art and science of mindful learning as we investigate the emerging field of contemplative education.  We will look at education and learning theories that inform contemplative pedagogies in K-12 and higher education.  We will also engage in contemplative practices and holistic inquiry to consider mindful learning from a personal perspective.  Students will develop their own models for contemplative teaching and learning. (M. Hammerle, visiting winter term instructor)

Melissa Hammerle, Ed.D., is the author of a research study entitled “Conceptualizing Contemplative Practice as Pedagogy: Approaches to Mindful Inquiry in Higher Education.” She is the Director of the MFA in Writing Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. She was, for many years, the Director of the N.Y.U. Creative Writing Program.

EDST 1008 Educational Change and Teachers Strike
From West Virginia to Chicago, teachers – the country’s largest sector of unionized workers – are striking. What are strikes and why do teachers use them? What do they mean for schools and communities? In this course we will examine teachers’ strikes as a way to understand the collisions of race, class, gender, and the state in education. Focusing on episodes of intense friction and controversy, this course will chart liberal, radical, and conservative tendencies in labor and educational history. Using theoretical, historical and contemporary texts about the politics of labor and education, students will critically examine the possibilities and limits for teachers’ organizing. AMR, NOR, SOC (E. Schirmer, visiting winter term instructor)

Eleni Schirmer is a PhD candidate at University of Wisconsin – Madison in Educational Policy Studies. A former co-president of the Teaching Assistants’ Association, the nation’s oldest graduate employee union, her writing has appeared in Jacobin, The Progressive, LaborNotes, Education Review and espnW.

EDST/INTD 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Students will learn and intensively practice basic sitting and walking meditation. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan, and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or EDST/INTD 0125), AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

John Huddleston retired from the Studio Art Program in 2017. For the last five years he also taught mindfulness courses at the college.

English and American Literatures

ENAM 0267 Kazuo Ishiguro
Winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature, Kazuo Ishiguro is among the most influential and celebrated of contemporary writers. In novels like Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, Ishiguro gives shape to today’s most pressing questions: about work and workers, the difficulties of intimacy and caring, the political consequences of historical perspective, and the ethical dilemmas facing scientists and educators. Moving between Europe and Asia, his novels also address the complex negotiation of cultural difference in a globalized world. We will explore his major works in great depth, supplementing our literary investigation with materials from other disciplines. (Diversity)  CMP, EUR, LIT (B. Graves)

ENAM 1003 Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as one of the very best novels ever written.  The sensation that was provoked by its publication in France in 1857, including a spectacular state trial of author and publisher on charges of public immorality, has long since faded into history, but the novel’s freshness, power, and influence can be felt to this day. In this course, we will read the novel in English translation, briefly review its historical and cultural context and its enduring literary heritage, and conclude with two film adaptations by Vincente Minnelli (1949) and Claude Chabrol (1991). LIT (D. Price)

ENAM 1033 Linked Short Stories: Examining Classic and Contemporary short Story Collections
Short story collections often gain in richness and resonance when the stories they contain are linked—whether that linkage exists in terms of community, setting, central characters, or major events.  In this course we will read Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio; Richard Ford’s Rock Springs; Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge; Alice Munro’s The Beggar’s Maid ; and Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried.  We will read to become experts in how individual stories are constructed and how they then build upon themselves.  Students will write two 7–8 page papers examining theme and technique.  As well, student will do some writing exercises that illuminate how these writers are achieving their effects. LIT (J. Obuchowski, visiting winter term instructor)

Janice Obuchowski is a fiction editor at the New England Review.  Her fiction has received a Special Mention in the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology, and her short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Gettysburg Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, LitHub, Four Way Review, Day One, Passages North, Slice, Grist Journal, and Seattle Review.  She has her BA in English from Cornell University, her MA in English from the University of Virginia, and her MFA in fiction from UC Irvine.

ENAM/ENVS 1034 African Environmental Writing, Photography, and Film
Concerned with social implications of environmental change, a burgeoning number of contemporary African photographers, filmmakers, and authors are challenging the public with social documents that protest ecologically destructive forms of neocolonial development. These works actively resist oppression, abuse, and conflagration of both the black body and the environment. Subverting the neocolonialist rhetoric and gaze, these creative practitioners complicate what it means to write about and look at those most affected by environmental injustices perpetrated by international and national actors. In this course we will view relevant photographs and films and read African environmental literature as sources of artistic and activist inspiration. Whilst reading, we will ask ourselves the hard questions of what to do with our own complicity when facing the role that the global north plays in the causation of environmental degradation and human suffering. Students will be expected to reflect upon how best to regard the pain of others in the Anthropocene, as well as upon how culture influences creative depictions of the Anthropocene. Seminar papers will address questions that arise from analyzing particular works. (Diversity) LIT, AAL, SAF (S. Ulmer)

CRWR/EDST 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision.  3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Cooper)

CRWR/THEA 0318 Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval)  ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio and video recorders–the tools of today’s investigative journalists–students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (projects ranging from dog sledding to ice fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history and the narrative thread. In addition to essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio and video files in the final writing projects. (Students will need a laptop and a small hard drive to house Adobe Premiere files for video editing. Video cameras & tripods supplied by the College.) (Approval Only) LIT (P. Lourie, visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book about Henry Morton Stanley and Dr. David Livingstone.  He has produced numerous multimedia stories from the Arctic for the National Science Foundation, including videos from a month-long icebreaker trip in the Beaufort Sea on Canada’s oldest and biggest icebreaker.  In 2017 and 2019, Macmillan published two adventure biographies: Jack London and the Klondike Gold Rush and Locked in Ice: Nansen's Daring Quest for the North Pole.

CRWR 1007 From Page to Podcast: Writing Audio Fiction
This course will have students writing short fiction, which will then be produced for podcast in collaboration with students in From Page to Podcast: Producing Audio Fiction. In the first half of the course, we will discuss craft through assigned readings and lecture, and students will present work for peer critique. Writers will then be paired with production students. Students can expect to gain skills applicable to a writer's life (e.g., working with an editor, giving a public reading, choosing an excerpt). Students will complete the term with a finished story—both on the page and in podcast. ART (A. Krupman, visiting winter term instructor)

Amanda Krupman is a writer and editor in Brooklyn, NY. Her short fiction and essays have been published in numerous print and digital magazines and journals.

CRWR 1008 Writing Powerful Fiction
Every work of fiction employs an implicit speaker, an invented persona independent from the author behind the tale. In this course, students will learn to increase the power of their fiction and release new possibilities by focusing on the building of a strong narrator, perhaps the most crucial tool in a writer’s craft arsenal. We’ll imitate, we’ll play, we’ll create new work. The focus will be on first-person writing but we’ll discuss the third person as well. There will be short writing assignments and an accompanying syllabus of short stories and novel excerpts for study and discussion. (Students must have taken one CRWR 01XX level course) ART (P. Erens, visiting winter term instructor)

Pamela Erens is the author of the novels The Virgins, The Understory, and, most recently, Eleven Hours. She has been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for First Fiction, the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing, and the John Gardner Fiction Book Award. Eleven Hours was named a Best Book of 2016 by NPR, The New Yorker, Kirkus, and Literary Hub. Erens’s essays and criticism have appeared in publications such as The New York Times, Vogue, Elle, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Los Angeles Review of Books.

Environmental Studies

ENVS/RELI 0395 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment
In this class we will consider the relationship between religion and ecology in some of the world’s great wisdom traditions, particularly Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.  Our approach will be comparative across traditions and attentive to a wide range of “big ideas” about human-nature relationships.  We will explore the ways in which religious traditions perpetuate ideas of the bio-physical world that are both “nature-affirming” and “nature-denying,” considering such themes as stewardship, sacred geography and the interdependence of living beings. We will also examine how, in contemporary times, religious identity has fueled and shaped religiously-based environmental activism.  (RELI 0110 or RELI 0130 or RELI 0160 or RELI 0190 or RELI 0295 or ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. This course counts as an approved humanities cognate for the environmental studies major. PHL, CMP (R. Gould)

ENVS/ENAM 1034 African Environmental Writing, Photography, and Film
Concerned with social implications of environmental change, a burgeoning number of contemporary African photographers, filmmakers, and authors are challenging the public with social documents that protest ecologically destructive forms of neocolonial development. These works actively resist oppression, abuse, and conflagration of both the black body and the environment. Subverting the neocolonialist rhetoric and gaze, these creative practitioners complicate what it means to write about and look at those most affected by environmental injustices perpetrated by international and national actors. In this course we will view relevant photographs and films and read African environmental literature as sources of artistic and activist inspiration. Whilst reading, we will ask ourselves the hard questions of what to do with our own complicity when facing the role that the global north plays in the causation of environmental degradation and human suffering. Students will be expected to reflect upon how best to regard the pain of others in the Anthropocene, as well as upon how culture influences creative depictions of the Anthropocene. Seminar papers will address questions that arise from analyzing particular works. This course counts as an approved humanities cognate for the environmental studies major. LIT, AAL, SAF (S. Ulmer)

ENVS 1038 Adirondack Park: Conversations about Conservation
The Adirondack Park is considered one of the world’s greatest experiments in conservation. Throughout its ~130 year history, this experiment has attempted to balance rigorous environmental protections for millions of wilderness acres with the economic realities of local residents who live within the park boundaries. We will undertake an interdisciplinary approach to explore park conservation is affected by climate change, rural economies, recreation, tourism, local food movement, and political action.  Building upon course readings, discussions, and direct engagement with the Adirondack landscape, stakeholders, and local industries, students will develop practical policy recommendations to address pressing conservation issues in the park.  This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (C. Dash, visiting winter term instructor)

Prof. Carolyn Dash majored in Biology at Kenyon College and received her Ph.D. in the Program for Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology at the University of Illinois.  Her research interests include conservation biology, disturbance ecology, climate change, and local food.

ENVS 1040 Theological and Ecological Perspectives on Climate Change
In this course we will examine the interplay between science and religion by examining ecological and theological perspectives on climate change. We will begin with an exploration of how ecology and Christian theologies see the relationship between humans and nature. From there, we will delve into climate change, asking how theological and ecological viewpoints contribute to our understandings of the problem and how each elicits responses in the form of social action and policy. The course will end with an examination of how partnerships between scientific communities and communities of faith are addressing climate change and environmental justice. This course counts as an approved Integrative Cognate toward fulfillment of the ES major cognate requirement.  PHL (A. Lloyd and A. Nagy-Benson, visiting winter term instructor)

ENVS 1041 Watershed Management for Lake Champlain: The Science and Policy of a "Wicked" Environmental Problem
In this course we will examine the scientific, political, and legal challenges that surround the “wicked problem” of nutrient pollution in Lake Champlain. We will take a multidisciplinary approach to understand the fundamental tenants of watershed management, the strategies available to address agricultural sources of pollution, and the ongoing legal battle over the future health of the lake. We will review scientific and technical reports, as well as primary materials with a focus on state and federal statutes and regulations. Class sessions will often feature round-table discussions with important stakeholders, including watershed scientists, attorneys, farmers, and state regulators. Students will work together to propose practical policies that can be applied locally. This course counts as an approved Social Science cognate toward fulfillment of the ES major cognate requirement. (C. Brooks, visiting winter term instructor)

Christopher Brooks, J.D., MELP, is an environmental lawyer and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and Natural Resource Management at Green Mountain College.

ENVS 1042 Science of Climate Change and Its Impact
The disruptive impacts of climate change are already being experienced by coastal communities around the world.  Therefore, it is imperative for world citizens to understand climate change and its resulting impacts.  In this course we will explore both the drivers of and the physical process of climate change.  Via in class discussion and student led presentations, we will also examine some of the downstream impacts of climate change with a focus on its effects on coastal regions.  In the twice weekly computer labs, we will develop a climate model for exploring energy balances and climate feedbacks, and learn the data analysis techniques that scientists have used to interpret trends and identify the changing dynamics that result in these climate impacts. This course counts as an approved Natural Science Laboratory cognate toward fulfillment of the ES major cognate requirement.  SCI (L. Herdman, visiting winter term instructor)

Liv Herdman is an oceanographer with the United States Geological Survey at the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz where she researches coastal storms, sea-level-rise, and erosion with numerical models. She has a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University where she studied coral reef circulation dynamics.

ENVS/GSFS 1043 Researching Women, Water, and Justice
In this course we will explore the process of launching a research project, with a focus on women, water, and justice. We will discuss the gender politics of water. We will then explore initial research processes, including problem identification, collecting community input, narrowing your focus, methods, data, and ethical concerns. Students will explore these issues through participation in the Environmental Contamination and Lactation Justice initiative, a research collaboration with the African American Breastfeeding Network (in Milwaukee). Students will conclude the course developing their own proposal on a women, water, and justice issue of particular interest to them. This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors. (E. Morrell)

Film and Media Culture

FMMC/HEBM 0258 Israeli Society through Films (In English)
In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel.  (formally HEBM 0250) AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (S. Keirans)

FMMC 1026 From Page to Podcast: Producing Audio Fiction
This course offers a deep dive into the world of audio fiction. As podcasts grow in popularity, so do the number and quality of fictional series. In this course students will read contemporary short fiction and listen extensively to great audio fiction including historical audio drama and recent podcasts such as The Truth and Welcome to Night Vale.  Finally, in a unique collaboration between this course and another called From Page to Podcast: Writing Audio Fiction, students will produce fictional audio works with stories created by Middlebury students in the other course.  By the end of this course, students will have developed studio recording and sound editing basics, a small archive of original foley, as well as a completed work of audio fiction. We will premiere the final in a special “listening room” that we organize together.  ART (E. Davis, visiting winter term instructor)

Erin Davis is the producer of the Middlebury original podcast It’s Not What You Think and The Power of a Wish from the Make-A-Wish foundation. Her audio work has aired on All Things Considered, Studio 360 and elsewhere. Her documentary film The Land premiered at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. Erin lives in Weybridge, VT.

FMMC 1029 Culture Jamming & Creative Media Activism
In this course we will study the practice of cultural resistance in the US after the Cold War, focusing mainly on creative media activism (culture jamming, subvertising, hashtag campaigns, etc.) directed against consumer capitalism. Discussions will be informed by critical theory (Adorno, Ahmed, Jenkins) and will explore fiction film (Fight Club), artwork (Banksy, Rodríguez-Gerada), and activist campaigns (Adbusters). Which cultural resistance strategies have worked well and why? How have corporations and the government responded to them? Students will gain the tools for crafting their own culture jams and creative media activist campaigns. (N. Dobreva)

FMMC 1135 Script Development Workshop
This course is organized in conjunction with the Middlebury Script Lab, a screenwriting residential workshop that brings together emerging screenwriters and established industry professionals. The students will attend screenwriting workshops, masterclasses and informal meetings with visiting writers and producers. Students will explore ideation techniques, finding a story that is appropriate for a feature length script, outlining and pitching. We will discuss dramatic structure in depth and explore the high-concept potential of your screenplay ideas, examining their aesthetic as well as their business possibilities. We will assemble a pitching packet for your projects, including synopsis, logline, mood board and fantasy casting. At the conclusion of this class, you will have a solid outline supported by pitching materials and a clear overview of your material. The class makes an excellent preparation for students who want to take FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II or who plan to write a screenplay for their senior tutorial. (FMMC 0106 or instructor approval) ART (I. Uricaru)

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (C. Nunley, A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS 0420 Representing Reproduction: The Politics of Reproduction 2
In this project-based seminar on reproductive politics, students will construct materials related to an animation about abortion that is being produced in the Middlebury Animation Studio. These materials may include a podcast, website, or game. Extending the discussions we had in GSFS 329: The Politics of Reproduction, we will also view popular cultural representations that focus on reproductive issues in the United States (such as television series, films, etc) and examine broader discussions of these representations (in blogs, podcasts, etc). Doing so will allow us to produce materials that both draw from academic discussions of reproduction and push beyond the limits of these texts for addressing contemporary reproductive politics. (GSFS 0329)  AMR, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

 GSFS/LNGT 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class.  (K. Hanta)

GSFS/ENVS 1043 Researching Women, Water, and Justice
In this course we will explore the process of launching a research project, with a focus on women, water, and justice. We will discuss the gender politics of water. We will then explore initial research processes, including problem identification, collecting community input, narrowing your focus, methods, data, and ethical concerns. Students will explore these issues through participation in the Environmental Contamination and Lactation Justice initiative, a research collaboration with the African American Breastfeeding Network (in Milwaukee). Students will conclude the course developing their own proposal on a women, water, and justice issue of particular interest to them. This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors. (E. Morrell)

Geology

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (B. Matthias, R. Russi)

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Zakai)

HEBM/FMMC 0258 Israeli Society through Films (In English)
In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel.  (formally HEBM 0250) AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

History

HIST 0240 History of Pakistan
This course is a political and cultural history of Pakistan. Topics to be discussed include: the pre-independence demand for Pakistan; the partitioning of India in 1947; literary and cultural traditions; the power of the army in politics; the civil war that created Bangladesh; the wars with India; the wars in Afghanistan; the rise of Islamist parties and militant groups; the significance of the Taliban and al Qaeda; and Pakistan's relations with the US, China and India. Readings will include histories, autobiographies, novels, and newspaper and magazine accounts. Several documentary films will also be shown. AAL, HIS, SOA (I. Barrow)

HIST 1028 Practicing Oral History
In this intensive, hands-on workshop, students will prepare for, conduct, and process their own oral histories. We will decide collectively on an overarching theme to investigate through the interviews, such as work, friendship, or mental illness. The first week will be introductory and theoretical. We will explore what oral history is, why historians do it, how the interview fits as an historical source among other sources, and the problem of memory. During the second week, students will focus on preparing for and conducting the interview. This will include conducting background research, developing consent forms, and refining interview techniques. The third week will be about making sense of the interview and exploring different ways to process it (indexing, abstracting, transcribing, storyboarding). Students will also write a reflective paper on the interview process. The fourth week will consist of historical presentations in which the interview is supplemented with other historical sources. The workshop will be grounded in the methodological concerns and questions of the discipline of history. It may also be of special interest to those interested in journalism, sociology, and anthropology (among other fields!). Students from any discipline, with prior oral history experience or none at all, are all welcome.  (L. Povitz)

HIST 1044 Policing the Globe
From the Casbah of Algiers to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, police militarization has become one of the key features of the contemporary security state across much of the world. In order to better grasp this global phenomenon, we will adopt a global historical approach. We will trace the historical origins of police militarization by investigating the rise of modern police forces in the nineteenth century, the history of European colonialism, decolonization, and the Cold War. Finally, we will finish with a study of the contemporary policing of dissent. Students will select a contemporary topic in policing and write a research paper, make a podcast, create a website, or make a documentary video. HIS, SOC (A. Prakash, visiting winter term instructor)

Amit Prakash is a historian whose work centers on global history, decolonization, the history of the police and surveillance, and French colonial history. His scholarship has been published in French Historical Studies and The Historian. For seven years, he was a lead instructor at Leadership Enterprise for a Diverse America (LEDA), a program which prepares students from economically underserved neighborhoods across the country with tools to gain entry to and succeed in elite colleges and universities. He has taught history at Columbia University and Bryn Mawr College. He is currently writing a book on counterinsurgency and contemporary American police practices. 

HIST 1045 The Vietnam War: Did Anyone Win?
Despite Old Testament injunctions not to "study war any more," in this course we will do exactly that, through the particular lens of America's experience in Vietnam.  We will learn the war's contested history; compare cultures and goals of the primary antagonist groups, Vietnamese and American; talk with soldiers who fought, and activists who resisted; explore the war in popular culture; and examine complicating factors: race and civil rights, class and the draft, and women's under-reported roles.  We will conclude by assessing war's costs, and debating the "lessons" Vietnam has to teach. The course will include multiple field trips outside of class time. The instructor will provide details after registration. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOA, SOC (M. Heaney, visiting winter term instructor)

Mike Heaney graduated from Middlebury College.  He led an infantry platoon in Vietnam until being wounded in action in 1966.  He later graduated Harvard Law School and practiced law for 25 years.  Mike then turned to teaching American and Legal History, earning a Ph.D. at Rutgers University in 2008.  He has focused on war, peace, veteran, and constitutional issues, teaching courses at Rutgers, Trinity, and Yale.  He works with troubled vets, and has expeditioned with former "enemy" soldiers in Russia, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam.  Heaney appears in The Vietnam War, a 10-episode PBS documentary, and recently sat on a panel at Middlebury with co-producers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.     

HIST 1046 Magic and the Occult in Early Modern Europe
Magical and occult thinking have played central roles in Western European culture, a point often overlooked or downplayed by historians who have concentrated on the development of rational thought and the decline of “superstition.”  Belief in the ability of human beings to interpret or manipulate supernatural powers shaped popular practices aimed at dealing with everyday problems as well as intellectual theories designed to explain the world.  We will examine both the popular and intellectual sides of magic, and how they came together with brutal force in the witch hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries. EUR, HIS (P. Monod)

 History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design              
Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research as well as field trips to see innovation in the works, including house tours (both in construction and finished). Students will work in teams and individually to analyze existing buildings and design their own.  Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (A. Nelson)

HARC 0351 Fictions of Formal Analysis
Art historical writing rests upon the precise description of art objects, yet the seemingly factual work of formal analysis is powerfully interpretive. This is so much so that many compelling descriptive passages in art history might be said to have a touch of fiction in them. To test this hypothesis, we will reverse these terms and explore instances of formal analysis and ekphrasis as they appear in contemporary fiction. Throughout we will consider the question: what might fictional description reveal about the historical strategies of formal analysis? Written work for the course will often be experimental in nature, potentially including semi-fictional approaches and writing that takes close looking to the point of defamiliarization. In our reading and writing, we will get away from traditional art historical writing for much of the course as a way to return to it more thoughtfully. Some exposure to art history expected. (Pass/Fail) ART, LIT (E. Vazquez)

HARC 1026 I'm So Mad I Made This Sign
In an increasingly visual world understanding the constructions intertwining image and text are an essential skill. Graphic design explicitly engages these structures, and in this course we will explore its history and practice through the design of Posters. The poster format offers a variety of challenges for the beginning designer in its uses of direction, narrative, and illustration.  Central to the course will be the history and theory of poster design. Putting this history into practice, each student will choose their own topic, research it, and design their own poster. By term’s end each student will have their own 18”x24” poster to be displayed. ART (S. Alavi, visiting winter term instructor)

With an MFA in Design, and a BS in Graphic Design, Sepi has been designing for 17 years.

HARC 1027 Mapping Gender in Nineteenth-Century Paris
Using works of art and primary and secondary texts as sources, we will analyze the impact of the built environment on shifting gender roles in Paris in the second half of the nineteenth century. We will consider the physical spaces resulting from the modernization of Paris—the avenues, public squares, apartment buildings, cafés, department stores, cabarets, and World’s Fair venues—as backdrops to and catalysts for this change. The intersection of class and race will also feature in our discussions. We will travel to Williamstown, Massachusetts to view original works of art at the Clark Art Institute and the Williams College Museum of Art.  ART (J. Vrooman, Middlebury College Museum of Art Staff)

Jason Vrooman ’03 is Curator of Education & Academic Programs at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. He majored in Studio Art at Middlebury and holds degrees in Art History from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art (M.A.) and New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts (Ph.D.).

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 0130 Business Ethics
Capitalism and competitive markets are often considered the most efficient system of simultaneously maximizing private wealth and public good. In the real world, however, truly competitive markets do not exist.   Imperfect markets have been made to work efficiently while protecting public good through systems of public intervention, i.e., laws and regulations, and voluntary self-restraint by business organizations in response to societal expectations. In this class we will consider the role of ethics in business, with students analyzing the process by which ethical norms and strongly held moral beliefs guide the conduct of economically driven business organizations.  Students will reflect on business managers’ responsibility to their owners, i.e., shareholders, other stakeholders, and society-at-large. (T. Ngyuen)

INTD 0274 AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: Construction Documents
Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, and affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to finalize and generate the construction documentation for the housing unit design generated in HARC 0371 & INTD 0273. A schedule of deliverables with an accompanying set of deadlines will need to be met to allow for construction to start in spring 2019. The studio components include final architectural and constructional detailing; building code compliance; building permitting finalization; physical and CAD modeling; structural coordination; and construction specifications.  Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time.(Approval Required) (S. Kredell)

INTD 1014 American Sign Language (ASL)
In this course we will introduce American Sign Language (ASL). It is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, and describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (J. Pirone, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2019
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, impact-focused learning. Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management. Acceptance into MiddCORE 2018 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter. A limited amount of financial aid is available to students who might otherwise be unable to enroll due to work-study or other financial obligations. Applications must be received by 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27. Decisions will be emailed by 8 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 29. (Pass/Fail; Approval Required) (J. Grant, H. Vila)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Many people have great ideas for new products or services, but few are willing and able to take the steps necessary to make these ideas a reality. Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Through lecture, class discussion, and hands-on mentoring, students will bring a project proposal from concept to launch quickly and effectively. Key concepts that will be taught include: opportunity analysis, financial planning, team building, and fundraising. Classwork will be supplemented with guest visits from notable entrepreneurs. To qualify for this class, each student must have a business idea—for profit or not for profit—for which they care passionately and are willing to commit the time and energy necessary to give the startup a real chance at success. Students must submit a short project proposal that can be found at go/entrepreneurs, which will ask you to describe in less than 500 words 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2). the product or solution you propose to solve this problem; and 3). why you are well suited to tackle this project.  Please email hneuwirth@middlebury.edu  with any questions  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury and Sam Roach Gerber, visiting winter term instructors)

INTD/EDST 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Students will learn and intensively practice basic sitting and walking meditation. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan, and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or EDST/INTD 0125), AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

John Huddleston retired from the Studio Art Program in 2017. For the last five years he also taught mindfulness courses at the college.

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor.  AAL, LNG, SAF (W. Roki, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera is an intellectual entrepreneur and an educator. She was the recipient of the 2010 Carolina Chiron Award for excellent teaching & dedication to students, an award inspired by the late Randy Pausch’s famous last lecture. Gave her own version of a last lecture entitled, “Humanizing the continent of Africa: Demystifying Myths & Stereotypes that Encroach it”. Her writings span diverse fields-The intersection of pathogens and women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, Gender, and African languages.

INTD 1173 Maternal and Child Health in Humanitarian Crisis
In this course we will introduce Maternal and Child Health (MCH) using a multidisciplinary approach, providing perspective on determinants of health and ways various levels of society and culture influence the health of women and children around the world. Issues will focus on: human rights; water; nutrition; sexual/ reproductive health; childbirth; infectious disease, and each as it relates to maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Case studies applying these topics to humanitarian crisis will be a focus of the course. Students will utilize MCH indicators to describe MCH as a part of holistic global health, using concepts learned in this course to illuminate the importance of MCH to socio-economic progress, sustainability, and ultimately, global development.  SOC  (M. McLaughlin, visiting winter term instructor)

Meg is a global health professional, originally from Vermont, focusing on international maternal and child health with a strong focus on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); reproductive and sexual health, and preventable illness in children. She has worked in the non-profit and benefit corporation sectors supporting and completing projects in Africa (Uganda, Ghana, Burkina Faso), South America (Ecuador), Central America and the Caribbean (Honduras and Haiti).

INTD/SOAN 1185 The Politics of Play
In this course we will look at historical and cultural constructions of play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control which act upon children’s time, space and behavior, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play to explore and move beyond conventional fixed equipment playgrounds to critically examine material and social environments which children and adults create for themselves. SOC  (This course counts as an elective towards the SOAN major) (M. Leichter-Saxby, visiting winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett Universit

INTD/THEA 1186 The Art of the Argument
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes presentation. In this course we will practice the fundamentals of writing and delivering arguments to a judge and jury. We will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors to persuade an audience. Against the backdrop of a Supreme Court or other federal decision, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers and present a persuasive legal argument. Through embodying different roles, in different settings, and taking part in performance exercises, students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose.  ART (M. Overbeck and R. Martin, visiting winter term instructors)

Mari Overbeck is a litigator in the San Francisco office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP and an Adjunct Professor at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. Rebecca Martin trains professionals in the art of public speaking, body language, delivery, and presence in the San Francisco Bay Area. Mari and Rebecca are both graduates of Middlebury College.

INTD 1193 The Origins and Politics of Graffiti and Street Art
Since its emergence in Philadelphia and New York City in the late 60s and 70s, graffiti writing has evolved into the most dynamic art form in urban culture to date, with global popularity. Through readings, films, and discussions, students will delve into the history, language, and techniques of graffiti writing, its evolution to street art, the role street art plays in the gentrification of blighted inner city areas, and the rise of arts districts through commodification of the art form. Students will also get to design and produce their own “tag” names, or nom de plume, utilizing techniques learned. ART (W. Condry, visiting winter term instructor)

Will Kasso Condry is a renowned street artist and community organizer currently living in Middlebury, Vermont. Considered the godfather of the Trenton, New Jersey art scene, Kasso promotes and produces graffiti-inspired art throughout the Northeast and the West Coast. Kasso firmly believes in the power of art to inspire, empower, create dialogue, and improve lives. He previously served as the Alexander Twilight Artist-in-Residence at Middlebury College where he completed extensive mural and portrait art at the Anderson Freeman Resource Center in 2017.

INTD 1196 Introduction to Media and Minorities
In this course we will learn a process for understanding how the media portray minorities. Students will be introduced to techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab that enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how social groups as diverse as immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will learn how to download bulk newspaper data from Lexis-Nexis, to process it using python notebooks, and to statistically analyze it using Stata as they work on a concrete project of their choice. (E. Bleich)

INTD 1197 Love in Action
In this course we will study the power of love to effect social change. We will review major historic episodes, including the Civil Rights Movement, post-Apartheid reconciliation in South Africa, and current efforts – including Black Lives Matter - to address longstanding injustice. We will learn from historic (e.g. Ella Baker) and contemporary (e.g., Van Jones) leaders who promote love as a ‘force more powerful’ and also study the limits of love in the pursuit of justice and reconciliation. During the course, selected members of the college community will share their perspectives on the power and limits of love.   SOC (J. Isham)

INTD 1199 Preventive Medicine in American Society: The Impact of Preventive-Medicine Based Healthcare and Public Health Policy for the Individual, Community and Nation
Chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2 and metabolic syndrome, will be responsible for 5 deaths globally for every 2 deaths caused by infectious disease by the year 2020. The incidents of chronic stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia and fatigue among the general population are widespread. These causes of mortality and morbidity are related to lifestyle factors including diet and activity, as well as to environmental and social factors.  In this class students will gain an understanding of the basic biology & pathophysiology of common diseases. Preventive medicine strategies will be evaluated and applied to individual, community and national models. (M. Perchemlides, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Matthew Perchemlides is a Vermont based primary-care-provider, doctor of Naturopathic medicine and specialist in integrative medicine and oncology. He integrates comprehensive diagnostic approaches with the most effective and least invasive conventional and preventive medicine strategies to control disease symptoms while treating each patient’s underlying medical conditions.

INTD/PSCI 1202 Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship
Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal.  Arguably, such self-governance requires informed and engaged citizens who intentionally participate in the decisions that govern their lives.  Clearly many factors like wealth, power, institutions, culture, democratic procedures and access to information, e.g. social media, and education all facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action.  In this course, we explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship to help us better understand the obligations and challenges that are part of being an informed and engaged citizen in our various communities.  CMP, SOC (S. Stroup, S. Viner)

INTD 1203 Health Policy in Action
This course is an academic internship course that combines a four day/week internship at a Vermont health care organization with one day/week in the classroom. Students will be assigned a specific research project (designed in advance by the faculty member and the internship sponsor) that must be completed by the end of the term. Class time will be spend debriefing the internship experience, building skills relevant to health policy analysis and working on the research project. Grading will based on participation, evaluation by internship sponsor, evidence of personal growth, and performance on final research project. (Approval Only, please contact the professor for more information) (J. Holmes)

INTD 1204 US disability Arts & Social Change
In this course we will explore US disability culture and social change movements across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on the roles and uses of art.  We will critically and creatively engage with wide-ranging primary sources, including community-based documentary films, posters and postcards, dance, memoirs, poetry, blogs, online exhibits, sculptures, and paintings.  Secondary sources from disability studies will undergird our work. We will ask: who tells which stories; how are these stories told and to whom; what are their impacts?. Paying careful attention to interlocking identities and systems of power, we will also consider tensions within disability communities in the United States. (AMST 0260 or AMST 0307 or by waiver) For waiver please contact Susan Burch at sburch@middlebury.edu). AMR, ART, NOR, SOC  (E. Clare, visiting winter term instructor)

Eli Clare is a Vermont-based author, educator, and activist whose work draws critical attention to disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice.

INTD 1205 Longform Sports Journalism in a Cultural Context
While the drumbeat that “newspapers and magazines are dead” goes on, sports longform journalism is actually flourishing on both traditional and what we once designated as “alternative media.” In this course we will examine that craft, as well as the cultural canvas upon which it is written, with the goal of producing one publishable longform piece by semester’s end.  To achieve that, students will deconstruct stories on a variety of subjects (race, cultural identity, gender politics, student-athlete unionism, violence on and off the field), learn about interviewing and story organization techniques, produce a weekly essay (in workshop format), and hear (both live and via Skype) from several of the writers who produced the pieces we will study. LIT (J. McCallum, visiting winter term instructor)

Jack McCallum was a senior writer at Sports Illustrated for thirty years and is still a Special Contributor to the magazine. He is the author of thirteen books and in 2005 was elected to the writers’ wing of the Basketball Hall of Fame.

INTD 1206 The Human Microbiome in Health and Disease
In this course we will study the microbes that live on and in humans, with particular emphasis on their contributions to both health and disease. We will focus on reports from scientific literature of the acquisition and maintenance of the microbiome, the interactions of the microbiome with the immune system, and the influence of the microbiome on a variety of diseases. Students will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of different techniques used to study the microbiome and how to critically evaluate the latest findings. (BIOL0140 or 0145) SCI (E. Putnam, visiting winter term faculty)

Emily Putnam (Middlebury ’10) is currently a candidate for Ph.D. at Yale University, studying microbiology and the microbiome in the laboratory of Dr. Andrew Goodman.

INTD 1207 Financing Community & Economic Development
Socially motivated projects such as affordable housing, community facilities, and public infrastructure are intentionally designed to produce rent and fee structures that are below private market rates. As a result, the economic value and resulting capital attracted to these projects is often below its cost to construct. Overcoming the related “gap” drives the field of community and economic development finance. In this course we will first examine why public subsidies are provided for socially impactful projects, what constitutes a financing gap, and how to fill those gaps using tax credits, municipal bonds, and public-private partnerships. SOC (M. Gaughan, visiting winter term instructor)

Michael Gaughan (’05.5) is the executive director and secretary of the Vermont Municipal Bond Bank. He was previously a director and a public-private partnerships manager for a national community development finance nonprofit. He also has related experience as a public finance banker focused on governmental, housing, and community facilities transactions.

INTD 1208 The International Commodity Business
Civilization has been moving natural resources for commercial purposes for thousands of years. In this course we will study the development of the international commodity trade. The course will look at why humans would move a natural resource from one place to another, addressed through four main areas of inquiry: (1) the innovations which have contributed to global resource trade (commodity extraction, waterborne transport, creation of financial exchanges); (2)  the effects that these commercial imperatives have on developing economies- both positive and negative, with a particular focus on the ‘commodity curse’;  (3)  how the introduction of an imported commodity can fundamentally alter societal behavior; and  (4)  the global economics of commodity markets, commodity indexes around the world, and how commercial developments are continually disrupting societies’ demand habits. SOC (C. Mulliken, visiting winter term instructor)

Christopher Mulliken received his Masters Degree in International Relations and Trade in 1987, and since that time has worked in the international Oil and Gas trading business, in both Trading and Management positions.

INTD 1209 Urban Portraits: Jerusalem, Beirut, Baghdad, and Dubai
In this course we will explore how contemporary Arab artists create urban portraits through their work. Each week we will focus on a different capital of the Arab Middle East that continues to capture the world’s fascination: Jerusalem, a contested and divided city claimed by all three monolithic religions; Beirut, a city recovering from a 15-year civil war; Bagdad, a city today besieged by violence; and Dubai, a city transformed by rapid globalization. Looking at a range of media, we will ask how cultural production confronts the traumas of the past, intervenes in a city’s socio-political realities, and imagines the future.  AAL, ART, MDE (S. Rogers, visiting winter term instructor)

Sarah Rogers is an art historian who co-edited the forthcoming MoMA publication, Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents

INTD 1210 Hindi for Beginners
This course is meant for complete beginners who would like to achieve elementary proficiency in Hindi.  It will cover everything necessary for students to be able to make themselves understood in everyday contexts such as introducing themselves, asking for directions, giving and responding to commands, talking about the weather, and more. In addition to learning the structures necessary for basic conversation, students will also learn to read and write Devanagari, the scripts used for Hindi. LNG (N. Tiwari, visiting winter term instructor)

Neha is a co-director of Zabaan Language Institute, New Delhi as well as a program manager and instructor. She manages the day-to-day affairs of the institute, designs curriculums for different programs, and teaches Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit and Persian.

INTD 1212 Statistical Models of the Stock Market
In this course we will learn about how the stock market works and more specifically what it means to be a “quant”.  Students will use Matlab extensively or another statistical package to try and build models that predict future stock movements.  Morning lectures/discussions will focus on the workings of the stock market and the inefficiencies that might be present.  In afternoons lab sessions and as homework students will work by themselves or in teams (with the instructor’s help) to build actual models of future stock prices.  Students will learn not only how to build those models but also how to evaluate how effective they are.  (S. Smallwood, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1213 Social Entrepreneurship and Global Health
Social and structural determinants of health create barriers to availability, accessibility and uptake of health services in many countries. We will take a case study approach to examining how social entrepreneurs develop and scale up responses to help clients overcome these barriers. We will explore factors including: human rights, poverty, disenfranchisement of women, government health care systems and infrastructure, human resources for health, task shifting, the politics of sexual/ reproductive health, and infectious diseases. We will draw on articles and online materials. This course mixes theory and case study, and will count as an elective towards the Global Health minor. SOC  (D. Torres, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1214 From Pooh Bear to Pixar: Children's Visual Media from a developmental Perspective
In an age where preschoolers are more technologically savvy than their parents, it’s becoming increasingly important to understand children’s media from a developmental perspective: how children experience and learn from the products adults make for them. In this course we will focus on visual media, dissecting picture books, videos, and apps from an interdisciplinary perspective. Through classic and contemporary examples, we will explore the history of media for children, theoretical bases of making meaning through pictures, implications for diversity and equanimity in media, and how new technologies may be transforming early childhood experiences.  SOC (C. Johnson, visiting winter term instructor)

My career in early childhood education began at Middlebury, when I was a work study student at Mary Johnson Children’s Center. In the years that followed, my career has spanned teaching at university lab schools, conducting academic research, and working at Silicon Valley start-ups. Through these varied experiences, I came to understand how connected child development is to a wide variety of fields and how important it is for all adults to consider how children understand the world around them. Teaching child development through the lens of children’s media would attract students who aren’t majoring in education or psychology, and would therefore reach a broader audience than standard early childhood education courses, especially as a J-Term offering. Students can then incorporate this knowledge and perspective into whatever field they choose to go into as future leaders.

INTD 1216 Discovering the Clown
In this physical theatre course students will discover the joy of being onstage, develop a personal relationship with the comic world, and find pleasure in a direct engagement with an audience. The study of theatrical clown helps connect students to the spontaneous, vulnerable, and generous impulses of their work. Through games, songs, improvisation, individual exercises, personal writing, and readings we will create a supportive ensemble to encourage each student to succeed in their unique way. Failure is encouraged. It's funny. And not funny. But that’s funny, too. ART ( J. Proctor, visiting winter term instructor)

Julia Proctor is an actor, the founder and director of Clown Gym, a maker of devised theatrical work, and an educator. She is a graduate of Middlebury College, has a Master of Fine Arts in Classical Acting from GWU, and has studied with some of the most prestigious clown teachers in the world. 

INTD 1217 Gender and Access to Health Care in Subsaharan Africa
In this course we will examine how gender issues impact access to health care in Sub-Saharan Africa. In September 2000, the international community adopted the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set by the United Nations Millennium Declaration. Students will analyze and measure how successful some African nations have been in dealing with the following four MDGs: to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health; and to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. We will study from an anthropological perspective the health care systems of Cameroon and Burkina Faso to assess how gender has shaped access to health care in these two countries and beyond. AAL, CMP, SAF, SOC (E. Kouokam, visiting winter term instructor)

Estelle Kouokam is a lecturer in Anthropology at the Université Catholique d’Afrique Centrale (UCAC)/Catholic University of Central Africa in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

INTD 1219 Applying New Tools and Technologies to Today's Security challenges on the Korean Peninsula
In 2017, North Korea tested a missile capable of delivering a powerful thermonuclear weapon against cities throughout the United States. How do scholars study international security challenges like the spread of nuclear weapons? In this course, students will develop an open source intelligence toolkit applicable to a broad universe of international security challenges, with special focus on nuclear weapons and North Korea. No prior knowledge is assumed, and students outside political science are encouraged to participate. The tools covered, such as satellite imagery, have broad applicability beyond nonproliferation, to areas such as human trafficking, climate change, oceans policy, and counterterrorism.  (J. Lewis, MIIS visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Jeffrey Lewis is Director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies. At the Middlebury Institute he teaches courses on arms control issues in Northeast Asia and Chinese nuclear policy.

INTN 1052 Coaching and Issues in Sports
In this team-taught course we will examine coaching and its impact on students from elementary school through the  college level. Students will develop a portfolio that will include coaching philosophy, sport psychology, physiology, and sport pedagogy. Each student will learn teaching techniques for his or her sport or sports of interest. Several guest speakers will lead discussions on current issues happening in the world of sports. Outside reading with response papers, in class participation, and a final portfolio will determine the grade. (Open to Juniors and Seniors only). (B. Beaney, visiting winter term instructor)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (S. Carletti, S. Mula)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (K. Davis, S. Abe)

LATIN

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I
The course offers an intensive introduction to the Latin language that prepares students to read the major authors of ancient Roman literature. In addition to their systematic study of grammar and syntax, students translate excerpts from Vergil, Seneca and the Vulgate Bible. This course is designed for students who have had no previous experience with Latin, as well as those who have had some Latin but want to review the fundamentals of grammar. LNG (R. Ganiban, P. Sfyroeras)

Linguistics

LNGT/GSFS 1005 Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically focusing on gender. Throughout the course, students will practice translating non-literary texts and will present their translations in class. (K. Hanta, visiting winter term instructor)

Karin Hanta is a translator with 25 years of experience and a PhD in Translation Studies (University of Vienna).

 

Music

MUSC 1008 Bob Dylan's America
Few figures in American music have had the far-ranging influence of Bob Dylan, who, willingly or not, personified the social turmoil of the 1960s. In this course we will examine the musical and literary traditions on which Dylan draws (rock 'n' roll, country music, the urban folk revival, and the Beat poets), assess his art of crafting songs, and survey the principal phases of his career. Drawing on a range of biographical and historical materials, we will also consider the relationship between the social movements of the post-1960s and the carefully crafted public persona that Robert Zimmerman named Bob Dylan. AMR, ART, NOR (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (D. Anderson, C. Christenson, M.J. Austin visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson (director) Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 13th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Les Misérables (2014), Ragtime (2015), Chicago (2016) and City of Angels (2017).   Mary Jane Austin will be joining them as the conductor.

 

Philosophy

PHIL 1010 The Philosophy of Happiness
This is a course on the philosophy of happiness, well-being, and human flourishing. We will consider both the big questions about the nature of these states (for instance, “What is happiness?” and “Is it necessary for a worthwhile life?”) and the specific topics typically taken to be essential to these states, such as pleasure, life satisfaction, virtue, and agency. While working from a philosophical perspective, we will integrate psychological research from the field of “positive psychology” into our analyses. Our readings will draw on contemporary works by both philosophers and psychologists, and will include works by Haybron, Feldman, Csikszentmihalyi, Diener, and Seligman. PHL (L. Besser-Jones)

PHIL/CMLT 1020 Modern Philosophy & Literature
In this course, focused on close, intensive readings of key texts, we will explore the border that both separates and joins philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning?  We will explore philosophical literature and literary philosophy in 20th Century works, mainly European and North American, on topics such as: style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Morrison, and Woolf. Philosophical readings will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Nussbaum and Ricoeur. (Previous course in PHIL or CMLT or waiver) (Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 0286) EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Woodruff)

PHIL/RELI 1073 Spinoza's "Book Forged in Hell": The Theological-Political Treatise
What is the role of religion in a modern state?  When religious freedoms collide with state interests, which should prevail? Spinoza rejected the authority of religion and the divine origin of Scripture, thus laying the groundwork for modern Biblical criticism and championing the separation of religion and state. A contemporary denounced the Treatise as “a book forged in hell.”  We begin with a close reading of the Treatise, followed by selections from his Ethics, and consider Spinoza’s long legacy: the rise of secularism, the origins of Biblical criticism, and the reasons why Spinoza has been called “the first modern Jew.” EUR, PHL (R. Schine)

Phyiscs

PHYS 0220 Introduction to Mathematica
Mathematica is a scientific software application that consists of a flexible high-level programming language with thousands of powerful built-in functions for symbolic, numeric, and graphical computation typical of physics and other quantitative fields.  Undergraduates can use Mathematica for coursework, senior projects, and throughout their professional careers.  In this course we will focus on the principles at the core of Mathematica and how these principles unify such a great range of computational capabilities. (PHYS 0109 and 0110; Recommended: MATH 0200 and a traditional “computer programming course” in high school or college) DED, SCI (J. Dunham)

Political Science

PSCI 1003 Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we will examine the history, current status and future of US-European relations, focusing on transatlantic security issues but with reference to political/economic/bilateral contexts.  The learning process will include lectures, class discussions, guest speakers, a role-playing exercise and a final policy options paper.  Issues covered include: persistent and evolving aspects of the “transatlantic bargain;” relations with Russia, Ukraine crisis; dealing with Islamic State threats and Middle East turmoil, refugees; impact of 9/11 and Iraq crisis; NATO in Afghanistan; US-European relations under the Trump administration; relations between NATO, the European Union and the UN; alternative transatlantic relations futures. (International Relations & Foreign Policy) CMP, EUR, SOC  (S. Sloan, a visiting winter term instructor)

Stan Sloan, a former senior U.S. government intelligence, foreign and defense policy expert and research manager, has taught courses on Euro-Atlantic Relations and American Power in the Middlebury Winter Term for the past 14 years.  He is one of America’s top experts on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, book chapters and books, including Transatlantic traumas: Has illiberalism brought the West to the brink of collapse? (2018) and Defense of the West: NATO, the European Union and the Transatlantic Bargain (2016).

PSCI/INTD 1202 Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship
Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal.  Arguably, such self-governance requires informed and engaged citizens who intentionally participate in the decisions that govern their lives.  Clearly many factors like wealth, power, institutions, culture, democratic procedures and access to information, e.g. social media, and education all facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action.  In this course, we explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship to help us better understand the obligations and challenges that are part of being an informed and engaged citizen in our various communities.  CMP, SOC (S. Stroup, S. Viner)

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Douglas, visiting winter term instructor)

James Douglas, ’72, successfully sought the office of Governor in 2002 and was inaugurated as the 8oth Governor of Vermont in January, 2003.  He was re-elected in 2004, 2006, and 2008.

PSCI 1155 Adversaries and Allies: Diplomacy in World War II and the Vietnam War
We will examine the diplomacy between allies and enemies during America's two most traumatic 20th Century wars. We begin with the origins of World War II in Europe, followed by the failed diplomacy between the United States and Japan. Then we consider war-time negotiations among allies on both sides.   The last two weeks begin with America's engagement in and escalation of the Vietnam War, and then move to Kissinger's secret negotiations with North Vietnam, as well as the troubled relationship between the U.S. and South Vietnam.  Classes are supplemented by films and other audio-visual materials. (International Relations & Foreign PolicyHIS (R. Leng, visiting winter term instructor)

Russell Leng is James Jermain Professor Emeritus of Political Economy and International Law, Middlebury College

PSCI 1159 Weapons of Mass Destruction
Technological development has brought human civilization to the point at which we can destroy ourselves in a matter of hours using weapons of mass destruction. What effects do these weapons have on political, and social behavior? Do WMDs deserve their own classification, or is human behavior consistent regardless of the weapon? We explore the technology, political theory and policy that has risen around the prospect of human annihilation. Students will travel to the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Washington, DC for one week to speak with policy experts on issues currently under consideration in national and global fora. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (A. Yuen)

PSCI 1160 Winning Elections: Running Political Campaigns in Modern America
Despite the success of TV’s Selina Meyer or Leslie Knope, winning a campaign for elected office is a lot more complicated than a good stump speech and a great logo. In this course we will examine what it takes to run a modern American campaign, including the ins-and-outs of political advertising, speechwriting, campaign finance, polling, data, and field organizing. We will look to first-party accounts of particular campaigns, including Mo Udall’s Too Funny To Be President, David Plouffe’s The Audacity to Win, and live interviews with current office-holders, to determine which strategies may be most successful for 2020 presidential contenders.  (American Politics) (B. Wessel, visiting winter term instructor)

Ben Wessel ’11.5 is the Director of NextGen Rising, the largest youth vote campaign in US elections history. Ben has run political campaigns since he was an undergrad at Middlebury and was named one of “16 Young Americans Shaping the 2016 Elections” by Rolling Stone magazine.

PSCI/SOAN 1161 Refugee Crises in South Asia
In this course we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to study cases of refugee crises in contemporary South Asia—one of the largest refugee hosting regions of the world. We will examine the ongoing Rohingya Refugee Crisis in the Bangladesh-Myanmar Borderland, and try to connect it to earlier refugee crises situations in the region, such as during the Partition of British India in 1947, the Bangladesh war of 1971, the disenfranchisement of Nepali-origin Bhutanese in the eighties, and the three decade-long Sri Lankan Civil War. Lectures will be complemented with film screenings and interviews of South Asia experts via Skype. (International Relations & Foreign Policy) (Anthropology) AAL, SOA, SOC  (R. Shahid, visiting winter term instructor)

Rudabeh Shahid, '10, is a doctoral candidate at Durham University, UK. Her PhD research is on the Bengali-speaking Muslim populations in India.

Psychology

PSYC 0332 Psychology and Work: An Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Students will learn how psychology is applied in industry and business settings. In particular, we will examine the psychological assessments used in hiring, evaluating, and training employees; issues involving harassment at work; organizational attitudes and behavior; employee satisfaction, stress and well being, work motivation, and leadership. Students will perform job analysis, read empirical research, and address the basic issues of validity in work assessments. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) SOC (M. McCauley)

PSYC 1003 Children and Families Living with Illness: Psychological, Spiritual & Cultural Perspectives
Over the course of a lifetime, most people are confronted with their own illness or the illness of a loved one. How do children and families cope with illness? How do they make meaning of their experiences? How do their spiritual and cultural beliefs impact their care and their views on healing?  We will examine developmental, psychological, cultural, and spiritual issues confronting children and families living with acute, chronic, and life-threatening illnesses. We will explore the psychological and spiritual interventions provided to children and families. Writings, artwork, and videotaped interviews will be used to illustrate varied perspectives on illness and healing.  SOC (L. Basili, visiting winter term instructor)

Laura Basili, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist whose therapeutic work focuses on how children and families make meaning of illness, suffering, and loss.  For ten years she worked at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

PSYC 1104 Psychology and Emerging Technology
Technology and new media are changing how we think, relate, connect, learn, and live. We will examine what a growing body of psychological research tells us about the pros and cons of our ever-changing digital world. We will review material on the use of cell phones, social media, video games, the internet, and artificial intelligence, examining topics such as attention and distraction, addiction, self-esteem, morality, and relationships with friends and family. The course will draw on multiple areas of psychology and involve both critical analysis of research and examination of our own behavior. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1450 or PSYC 0415).  3 hrs. lect. SOC (B. Hofer)

Religion

RELI 0298 Privilege and Poverty: The Ethics of Economic Inequality
In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality.  Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality.  We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” PHL, SOC (J. Davis)

RELI/ENVS 0395 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment
In this class we will consider the relationship between religion and ecology in some of the world’s great wisdom traditions, particularly Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.  Our approach will be comparative across traditions and attentive to a wide range of “big ideas” about human-nature relationships.  We will explore the ways in which religious traditions perpetuate ideas of the bio-physical world that are both “nature-affirming” and “nature-denying,” considering such themes as stewardship, sacred geography and the interdependence of living beings. We will also examine how, in contemporary times, religious identity has fueled and shaped religiously-based environmental activism.  (RELI 0110 or RELI 0130 or RELI 0160 or RELI 0190 or RELI 0295 or ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. This course counts as an approved humanities cognate for the environmental studies major. PHL, CMP (R. Gould)

RELI 1038 The Arabian Nights—Storytelling, Orientalism, and Islamic Culture
In this course we will study the great medieval classic The Arabian Nights or The Thousand and One Nights Entertainment. Compiled in Egypt and Syria in the 14th century and translated into French and other European languages in the 17th and 18th centuries, this “ocean story” has had a profound effect on the development of the literatures of both the Middle East and the West. The incorporation of ‘Arabian Nights’ motifs in European art and orientalist discourse will be central in our enquiry.  AAL, CMP, LIT, MDE (S. Goldman)

RELI/PHIL 1073 Spinoza's "Book Forged in Hell": The Theological-Political Treatise
What is the role of religion in a modern state?  When religious freedoms collide with state interests, which should prevail? Spinoza rejected the authority of religion and the divine origin of Scripture, thus laying the groundwork for modern Biblical criticism and championing the separation of religion and state. A contemporary denounced the Treatise as “a book forged in hell.”  We begin with a close reading of the Treatise, followed by selections from his Ethics, and consider Spinoza’s long legacy: the rise of secularism, the origins of Biblical criticism, and the reasons why Spinoza has been called “the first modern Jew.” EUR, PHL (R. Schine)

RELI 1076 Religion and Food
This course will examine religion and the construction of religious identity, morality, and community through food and cooking practices. We will consider how “rules” about what, where, when, and with whom one can or cannot eat not only shape the values of particular religious traditions, but also how they inform our very sense of what “counts” as religious. We will engage with practices from a variety of the world’s religious traditions and students will conduct independent research about specific practices of their own choosing in any tradition. CMP, PHL (J. Ortegren)

RELI 1077 Feeling Religion
What is the relationship of emotion to religion? What’s at stake when joy, sadness, disgust, outrage, boredom, and fear have religious significance? How are individuals and communities taught to feel religiously or to sense something as spiritual? And how do understandings of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age and ability shape these feelings? In this course, we will wrestle with these questions and others through critical examination of weekly case studies ranging from government debates over sacred Pueblo Indian dances to the emotional terrain of religion, American football, and nationalism.  PHL (A. Howe visiting winter term instructor)

Amy Rae Howe is a scholar of religion, gender and culture. Her research interests include studies of emotion, literature, and social reform. She recently earned her PhD in the Study of Religion at Harvard and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses at Harvard and Brown. She lives in Huntington, Vermont.

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Portice, I. Shustina)

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN 1034 Skull Wars: Sordid True Tales of Rapacity, Revenge, and Racism in the Search for Human Origins
Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. Richard Leakey and Don Johanson. Lee Berger and Tim White. In this course we will examine how jealousy, competition, and racism drive knowledge production and sabotage in the hunt for human ancestors. We’ll do so by exploring how these personalities, and others, have leveraged the media, from the New York Times to National Geographic, to push forward their vision and status in science. Through scientific articles, popular books, and film, we’ll also explore how colonialism, neo-colonialism, and racism have plagued, and continue to plague, the science of paleoanthropology. (Anthropology) SOC (K. Brudvik, visiting winter term instructor)

Mr. Brudvik is a Registered Professional Archaeologist and paleoanthropologist with over 15 years of field and research experience in the United States and Ethiopia. Before moving to Middlebury, he worked in natural and cultural resources management in California, focusing on paleontology and Native American burial protection.

SOAN 1035 Refugees or Labor Migrants: The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to move to high-income countries.  How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on research with international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., as well as African and Mideastern migration to Europe (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1021 or SOAN 329)  AAL, AMR, CMP, SOC (D. Stoll)

SOAN 1036 Global Population Dynamics
In this course we will study three major processes of population change - fertility, mortality, and migration. We will learn about the theories and methods demographers use to explain population change. Course concepts will be applied to explore questions, such as: Why are birth rates in Italy and Japan so low? What were the consequences of China’s One Child Policy? Are fears of global overpopulation grounded or exaggerated? What is the immigrant health paradox and does it still exist? Course material primarily draws on perspectives from sociology with additional materials from global and public health, economics, gender studies, and anthropology. (Sociology) SOC (C. Pinar, visiting winter term instructor)

Candas Pinar is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Yale University.  Her dissertation examines distorted sex ratios at birth in Azerbaijan.

SOAN/PSCI 1161 Refugee Crises in South Asia
In this course we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to study cases of refugee crises in contemporary South Asia—one of the largest refugee hosting regions of the world. We will examine the ongoing Rohingya Refugee Crisis in the Bangladesh-Myanmar Borderland, and try to connect it to earlier refugee crises situations in the region, such as during the Partition of British India in 1947, the Bangladesh war of 1971, the disenfranchisement of Nepali-origin Bhutanese in the eighties, and the three decade-long Sri Lankan Civil War. Lectures will be complemented with film screenings and interviews of South Asia experts via Skype. (International Relations & Foreign Policy) (Anthropology) AAL, SOA, SOC  (R. Shahid, visiting winter term instructor)

Rudabeh Shahid, '10, is a doctoral candidate at Durham University, UK. Her PhD research is on the Bengali-speaking Muslim populations in India.

SOAN/INTD 1185 The Politics of PlayIn this course we will look at historical and cultural constructions of play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control which act upon children’s time, space and behavior, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play to explore and move beyond conventional fixed equipment playgrounds to critically examine material and social environments which children and adults create for themselves. SOC (This course counts as an elective towards the SOAN major) (M. Leichter-Saxby, visiting winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett Universit

Spanish & Portuguese

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish                                 
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (M. Hernandez-Romero)

SPAN 1302 Auto-fiction (Autobiographic) Writing
In this course we will focus on the development of personal writing.  Our goal is to produce written material that stems from the realm of our own subjectivity.  Confession, secret, memoire, autobiography, journal, letters, chronicle, and non-fiction writing will be central.  We will achieve our objectives through theory and practice of intimate writing.  We will also have the opportunity to read and discuss literary works of important Hispano-American authors (literature and theoretical works) including Cortázar, González-Valdés, Fernández, Giardinelli, Grijelmo, Larrosa, Latini, Mangel, Onetti, Piglia, Rodríguez, and Vargas Llosa. AAL, AMR, LNG (R. Chavez-Castaneda)

Studio Art

ART 1028 Introduction to Painting
In this class we will cover the technical and conceptual essentials of painting.  We will learn basic painting skills including building stretcher bars, priming, composition, and working with oil paint, and will cover principles of drawing, design, and color. Beyond the basics, this class will uncover painting’s specific capacity to underline the intersection of the “stuff of the world” and how we perceive it.  Moving through major movements of 20th century art, we will step into the perceptual and conceptual shoes of these moments and occupy them with their own individual expression.  Importance will be placed on class critiques, dialogue, and building a painting vocabulary.  Each student will be required to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials. ART (R. Watson Horn, visiting winter term instructor)

Rebecca Watson Horn is an artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.F.A. from Cooper Union and an M.F.A. from Rutgers in painting. She has exhibited at Soloway, NY, Exit Art, NY, Cleopatras, NY, Recess, NY, Lyles and King, NY, David Lewis Gallery, NY, Kristina Kite, LA, and White Columns, NY.

ART 1031 A New World
In this course we will be exploring introductory drawing with an animation component which will also combine 2-D and 3-D stop-motion animation processes. The goal is to create a “new world” with the students and to document it. Basic drawing assignments in still life, figure drawing and perspective will be part of exploring this “new world.”  2-D and 3-D stop-motion techniques will also be utilized by the students to interact with this large-scale environment.  The final projects of this month-long exploration will be drawings from observation, sketchbooks, animation films and photographic stills of the process; all of which will be presented in a final exhibition for Winter Term. (H. Wallner, C. Boyd)

Theatre

THEA 0101 Visual Creativity for Stage
Students will develop an understanding of color, line, form, shape, texture, and balance as they apply to historical and current theatrical literature. Projects in figure drawing, charcoal and chalk, watercolor painting, and model making are intended to stretch the student's research ability, artistic imagination, critical-analysis, and presentation skills. The class is designed for all students interested in the visual and the performing arts and serves as an introduction to set, costume, and light design. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. ART (H. Zieselman)

THEA/CRWR 0318 Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval)  ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

THEA/INTD 1186 The Art of the Argument
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes presentation. In this course we will practice the fundamentals of writing and delivering arguments to a judge and jury. We will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors to persuade an audience. Against the backdrop of a Supreme Court or other federal decision, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers and present a persuasive legal argument. Through embodying different roles, in different settings, and taking part in performance exercises, students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose.  ART (M. Overbeck and R. Martin, visiting winter term instructors)

Mari Overbeck is a litigator in the San Francisco office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP and an Adjunct Professor at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. Rebecca Martin trains professionals in the art of public speaking, body language, delivery, and presence in the San Francisco Bay Area. Mari and Rebecca are both graduates of Middlebury College.

Writing Program

WRPR 0204 Narratives on Rivers, Nature, and Ecology
In this course we will travel to Acadia National Park in Maine for several days for place-based experiential learning and writing. The remaining time will be spent on campus in Middlebury. We will practice non-fiction story telling with a focus on narrative essay-writing about rivers and water as places that are ecologically, emotionally, imaginatively, and spiritually significant.  We will also explore other forms of narratives, including story-telling through combination of image and word. Students should be prepared to travel off-campus for four days and three-nights and to spend time outdoors traipsing through woods along rivers and streams. Travel costs are covered. Registration is by approval only from the instructor. Questions about travel and financial or time implications of missed work or practice should also be directed to the instructor, Prof. Matthew Dickerson. (Approval Only) CW (M. Dickerson)

WRPR 1005 Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using Louise De Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, essays and book excerpts that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own healing narratives in a workshop setting. Assignments will include short in-class writing prompts, 3 essays, Canvas responses, and a final portfolio of 15-20 pages of revised work.  CW, LIT (J. Crystal, visiting winter term instructor)

Jennifer Crystal is a writer and educator in Boston who focuses on writing to heal projects, narrative medicine, and travel writing. She teaches creative writing seminars and workshops at Grub Street Writing Center and is the author of Et Voilà: One Traveler’s Journey from Foreigner to Francophile. She is a weekly columnist for the Global Lyme Alliance, and is working on a book about her medical trajectory. She is a graduate of Middlebury College (’00) and earned her M.F.A. at Emerson College.

WRPR 1006 Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including letters, reported personal essays, op-eds, and reviews. We will work on developing critical thinking and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns, and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will be encouraged to publish their work for public consumption on campus or beyond. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints. CW, SOC (S. Greenberg, visiting winter term instructor)

Susan H. Greenberg is a writer, editor, and teacher who spent 22 years at Newsweek magazine.  Her work has also been published by the New York Times, The Washington Post, the Atlantic, Scientific American, and Middlebury magazine.  She lives in Middlebury, VT, with her husband, three childred, two dogs, a rabbit and a corn snake that terrifies her.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.