Winter Term 2020

 

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WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
  
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Interdepartmental 
    Linguistics
    Writing Program
 

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German
   Greek

   Hebrew
   Luso Hispanic Studies
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Anthropology
  Education Studies
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
  

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Physics

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


American Studies

AMST 1020 Asian American Food Studies
In this course we will discuss how food shapes a sense of belonging and identity in Asian America. Going beyond how Asian American cultures are consumed through food items and restaurants, we will focus on how Asian Americans have defined themselves through food. Required readings will engage questions about the production, circulation, and consumption of food. We will critically engage the genres of memoir, recipe books, fiction, historical accounts, cultural criticism, and food criticism as we write pieces in each of these styles. There will also be a limited amount of cooking involved in the course. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (R. Joo)

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (D. Ayoub, A. Nash)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145;  Open to BIOL majors or by waiver.) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0280 Immunology
In this course we will explore the human immune system and how it works to protect the body from infection.  Students will be introduced to the cells and molecules of the immune system and how they work together to protect the host from foreign invaders.  We will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of innate immunity before exploring the cellular and genetic principles that underlie the adaptive immune response.  Finally, we will investigate how innate and adaptive immunity work together to combat infection and how disease can arise from inadequacies in this coordinated host response. (BIOL 0145) SCI (G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0325 Conservation Genetics
In this course we will explore the field of conservation genetics, which focuses on the application of genetic analyses to the conservation and management of biodiversity. This integrated lecture and laboratory course covers general topics in conservation genetics such as genetic variation, and population structuring as well as the practical implementation of commonly used conservation genetics methodologies. Students will conduct an original research project that they will transform into a journal-style article at the end of the semester.  As such, students should prepare to read and discuss primary literature, conduct original research, and write scientifically. (BIOL 0140 and 0145) This course will count as a Biology elective. SCI (C. Frare, visiting winter term instructor)

I am Christina Frare, a conservation geneticist currently based in New York.  I have my PhD in biology, with a focus in conservation genetics from Fordham University, and am particularly interested in using genetic methods to student mammalian response to anthropogenic change

BIOL 0371 Advanced Field Biology: Place-based Global Biology Education
In this biology research course, we will conduct field-based scientific observation, sample and data collection, and interpretation of biological phenomena in coral reef environments on Abaco Island, Bahamas. Students will be deeply engaged in off-campus, place-based learning practicing population genetics, ecology, genomics, biogeochemistry, and site mapping via Rapid Ecological Assessment (REA) protocols. The course is approximately two weeks off-campus (travel costs covered) and two weeks on-campus conducting group research projects integrating field observations with laboratory analysis. Data and samples will be collected while diving and snorkeling in Abaco (dive training available, costs covered) and analyzed both in Abaco and at Middlebury.  This work will contribute to ongoing active reef research with global reef conservation implications. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0140 and a 300-level BIOL class with laboratory or waiver. Instructor approval required; BIOL major or by waiver). (E. Eggleston, J. Ward)

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (W. Xu, K. Wang, S. Yuecao, Y, Zhang,)

 

Comparative Literature

Computer Science

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

Dance

DANC 0375 Dance and Design
In this course we will examine the relationship between light, space, costume design, and movement. Through readings, writings, screenings, physical embodiment and acquired technical skills, students will be engaged in a learning process that integrates diverse aspects of dance and design. With hands on projects we will explore the influence of the physical environment, on the generation of ideas, cultivation of movement vocabulary, and the process of fostering choreographic philosophy and aesthetics. This course will culminate in a final performance of works created during the term. ART (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can expect daily rehearsals plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval Required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (K. Borni)

DANC 1025 Radical Humanity: Performance and Social Activism
In this course we will cover the history of performance art and the dynamic power of activism; we will focus primarily on the collaborative creation of performance infused with a social conscience. Content will range from political science to women and gender studies to civil rights. Looking at art-making through the eyes of pivotal historical figures in addition to contemporary artists, we will gather techniques to develop solo and group performances. Readings, films, journal writing, and studio research will be an integral part of this highly experiential class. ART (R. Daniels, visiting winter term instructor)

Reggie P. Daniels is an Adjunct Professor at The University of San Francisco and has been an inspiration to others because he has turned his life around from being an ex-offender to now a Youth Director at the San Francisco Sheriff's Department. His work has been awarded by KQED, "Black Heros Award" . He also was recognized by the Bay View Hunters Point Foundation and received the "Change Agent Award" to reflect his personal and professional achievements

Education Studies

EDST/LNGT 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003) (S. Shapiro)

EDST 0306 Elementary Science Methods
In this course we will investigate children’s scientific understanding and how to design learning experiences to advance their understanding. Students will learn to use a claim/evidence/reasoning framework to develop children’s scientific explanations.  We will also study recent research in science education and the engineering and design process.  Activities will include observing science instruction, conducting assessments, lesson planning, and teaching standards-based lessons. Students will gain an understanding of how to plan, implement, and assess science instruction through class and field placements in local schools (approximately 15 hours/week).  Students will also collect evidence and write an entry for their Vermont licensure portfolio. (Approval Required) (T. Weston)

EDST 1008 Educational Change and Teachers Strike
From West Virginia to Chicago, teachers – the country’s largest sector of unionized workers – are striking. What are strikes and why do teachers use them? What do they mean for schools and communities? In this course we will examine teachers’ strikes as a way to understand the collisions of race, class, gender, and the state in education. Focusing on episodes of intense friction and controversy, this course will chart liberal, radical, and conservative tendencies in labor and educational history. Using theoretical, historical and contemporary texts about the politics of labor and education, students will critically examine the possibilities and limits for teachers’ organizing. AMR, NOR, SOC (E. Schirmer, visiting winter term instructor)

Eleni Schirmer is a PhD candidate at University of Wisconsin – Madison in Educational Policy Studies. A former co-president of the Teaching Assistants’ Association, the nation’s oldest graduate employee union, her writing has appeared in Jacobin, The Progressive, LaborNotes, Education Review and espnW.

EDST/INTD 1077 Rural Decline and the Future of Vermont Public Schools
In this course students will examine how the stresses created by Vermont’s shrinking rural population affect the future planning,  governance, and politics regarding local public schools.  Students will conduct research projects to better understand the increasing pressures and realities local districts face regarding such issues as enrollment declines, inequitable distribution of access and resources, increasing student needs, significant facility upgrade or repair needs, community engagement and local control, and state and local property taxes.  By the end of the course, we will have weighed competing interests, collated and compared a wide range of relevant data, and considered some solutions. (A. McGlashan, Director of Academic Outreach and Special Projects CCI)

EDST/INTD 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Students will learn and intensively practice basic sitting and walking meditation. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan, and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or EDST/INTD 0125), AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

John Huddleston retired from the Studio Art Program in 2017. For the last five years he also taught mindfulness courses at the college.

English and American Literatures

ENAM 0103 Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories from a wide range of eras and nations. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered; the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. Please be aware that this is a full CW course compressed into J-term; the writing and reading loads will be intense. (Diversity) CW, LIT (A. Losano)

 ENAM 1001 Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Coetzee’s Elizabeth Costello, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective. LIT (C. Baldridge)

ENAM 1003 Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as one of the very best novels ever written.  The sensation that was provoked by its publication in France in 1857, including a spectacular state trial of author and publisher on charges of public immorality, has long since faded into history, but the novel’s freshness, power, and influence can be felt to this day. In this course, we will read the novel in English translation, briefly review its historical and cultural context and its enduring literary heritage, and conclude with two film adaptations by Vincente Minnelli (1949) and Claude Chabrol (1991). LIT (D. Price)

ENAM/ENVS 1014 Poetry and the Marine Environment
In this course we will read and discuss Anglophone poetry about the sea, from the Old English poem The Seafarer to Derek Walcott’s /The Sea is History/. Our two main goals will be to investigate how poets imagine the marine environment and to bring multiple interpretive approaches to bear on literary texts from different regions and traditions. These approaches will include formal, contextual, and theoretical methods of inquiry. We will read poems by a diversity of poets, including John Masefield, Rudyard Kipling, Adrienne Rich, Derek Walcott, and Mary Oliver. LIT (D. Brayton)

ENAM/ENVS 1034 African Environmental Writing, Photography, and Film
Concerned with social implications of environmental change, a burgeoning number of contemporary African photographers, filmmakers, and authors are challenging the public with social documents that protest ecologically destructive forms of neocolonial development. These works actively resist oppression, abuse, and conflagration of both the black body and the environment. Subverting the neocolonialist rhetoric and gaze, these creative practitioners complicate what it means to write about and look at those most affected by environmental injustices perpetrated by international and national actors. In this course we will view relevant photographs and films and read African environmental literature as sources of artistic and activist inspiration. Whilst reading, we will ask ourselves the hard questions of what to do with our own complicity when facing the role that the global north plays in the causation of environmental degradation and human suffering. Students will be expected to reflect upon how best to regard the pain of others in the Anthropocene, as well as upon how culture influences creative depictions of the Anthropocene. Seminar papers will address questions that arise from analyzing particular works. This course counts as a Humanities cognate for environmental studies majors. (Diversity) LIT, AAL, SAF (S. Ulmer)

ENAM/INTD 1075 Debating Global Literature
In this course we will analyze literary texts in the context of current debates on globalization, world literature, colonial and postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, and gender studies. Readings will include Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Helon Habila’s Oil On Water, C. N. Adichie’s “Jumping Monkey Hill,” and Madeleine Thien’s Certainty, as well as theoretical readings from the fields of postcolonial studies, politics, history, development studies, and anthropology.  AAL, LIT, SOA, SOC  Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM/INTD 1135 British Popular Culture
George Orwell once described the English in terms of their fondness for “the pub, the football match, the back garden, the fireside, and the ‘nice cup of tea'." But what would he have made of the Sex Pistols or Amy Winehouse? In this course we will trace a particular arc through post-1945 British popular culture in order to ask how we got from Orwell to The Office, from the Rolling Stones to Radiohead. We will ask how film, music, and TV prepared the ground for important episodes in British history: the “special relationship” with the United States, the modernization of sexuality, the transformation from welfare state to free market capitalism, the slow passage toward a multicultural society. ART, EUR, SOC (B. Graves)

CRWR 0175 Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. ART (K. Gotthshall)

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera—the tools of today's investigative journalists--students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s /Running the Amazon/ and Joan Didion’s /Salvador/, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105.  LIT (P. Lourie)

Environmental Studies

ENVS/ENAM 1014 Poetry and the Marine Environment
In this course we will read and discuss Anglophone poetry about the sea, from the Old English poem The Seafarer to Derek Walcott’s /The Sea is History/. Our two main goals will be to investigate how poets imagine the marine environment and to bring multiple interpretive approaches to bear on literary texts from different regions and traditions. These approaches will include formal, contextual, and theoretical methods of inquiry. We will read poems by a diversity of poets, including John Masefield, Rudyard Kipling, Adrienne Rich, Derek Walcott, and Mary Oliver. LIT (D. Brayton)

ENVS/ENAM 1034 African Environmental Writing, Photography, and Film
Concerned with social implications of environmental change, a burgeoning number of contemporary African photographers, filmmakers, and authors are challenging the public with social documents that protest ecologically destructive forms of neocolonial development. These works actively resist oppression, abuse, and conflagration of both the black body and the environment. Subverting the neocolonialist rhetoric and gaze, these creative practitioners complicate what it means to write about and look at those most affected by environmental injustices perpetrated by international and national actors. In this course we will view relevant photographs and films and read African environmental literature as sources of artistic and activist inspiration. Whilst reading, we will ask ourselves the hard questions of what to do with our own complicity when facing the role that the global north plays in the causation of environmental degradation and human suffering. Students will be expected to reflect upon how best to regard the pain of others in the Anthropocene, as well as upon how culture influences creative depictions of the Anthropocene. Seminar papers will address questions that arise from analyzing particular works. This course counts as an approved humanities cognate for the environmental studies major. This course counts as a Humanities cognate for environmental studies majors. LIT, AAL, SAF (S. Ulmer)

ENVS 1035 The Politics of Hope
In this seminar we will wonder about hope: what it is (and isn’t), why we need it (or don’t), and how we might go about finding such a thing. Stepping back from nuts-and-bolts discussions of policy cycles and climate models, we will ask ourselves deeper questions about what it means to live in a time of planetary environmental transformation. As thinking, feeling, acting people struggling to find our feet in this surreal historical moment, our task is to reconstruct ways of relating to this predicament that are honest and rigorous in their analytical reckoning but more than paralysis, nihilism, or despair. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 1036 Sea Turtles to Sharks
In the past two decades there has been an exponential increase in the number and size of marine protected areas (MPAs) worldwide. MPAs are used to aid fisheries, protect biodiversity, and stabilize coastal ecosystems. In this course we will engage an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from the fields of conservation biology, political ecology, and anthropology, to investigate MPA design and effectiveness in multiple locales globally. Specific issues we will investigate include: marine organism life-cycle traits, connectivity, land-sea linkages, predator-prey dynamics, centralized versus decentralized MPA governance, gendered marine property, indigenous rights, and “sea grabbing.” We will draw comparisons among MPA projects and examine dynamics between individuals within a given MPA project. The course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors. SOC (M. Baker-Médard)

ENVS 1044 Food, Farms, Future: Vermont
What does it mean to regionalize New England’s food system, and what is Vermont’s role in doing so? In this course, taught by two recent alumnae working in Vermont food systems and conservation, we will critically examine histories of Vermont’s food system, discuss recent reports about the future of agriculture, explore policies and programs currently supporting Vermont's food system, and meet with farmers and food system practitioners. As a final project, students will propose a policy or program that would facilitate the land use and food future they believe in for Vermont. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors. (J. Bartlett and K. Michels, visiting winter term instructors)

Katie Michels ‘14.5 is Program Coordinator at the Vermont Housing & Conservation Board’s Vermont Farm and Forest Viability Program, where she works with farms and food system organizations to support business viability and environmental stewardship. She studied geography and environmental studies at Middlebury.

Jeannie Bartlett ‘15 manages the Franklin County Conservation District, where she works closely with the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service to develop programs to assist farmers with stewardship of soil and water in northwest Vermont. She studied Conservation Biology at Middlebury.

ENVS 1045 Waging Winning Campaigns: How to Advocate for Change
Campaigns are organized ways to achieve a particular political or social goal. Whether you are passionate about advancing solutions to climate change, increasing wages, fighting bigotry, expanding healthcare access, or anything else, you will need to inspire others to join your cause, develop persuasive, evidence-based arguments, communicate effectively, and influence decision-makers to act on your demands. In this course we will use case studies, guest lectures, discussions, and small group projects to design and launch successful campaigns. We will practice skills such as selecting campaign targets, power-mapping, writing press releases, delivering persuasive pitches, generating compelling digital content, holding 1:1 organizing meetings, measuring impact, and celebrating victories. This course counts as a social science cognate for environmental studies majors. (SOC) (P. Aroneanu & D. Moore, visiting winter term instructors)

Phil Aroneanu (‘06.5) is an organizer, campaign manager and political strategist with over a decade of experience working at the local, state, national and international levels on climate advocacy, progressive politics and movement-building. He is a co-founder of 350.org, and currently leads digital organizing at ACLU.

Deborah Moore is an advocate, scientist, and social entrepreneur for the environment and human rights with three decades of experience advancing climate and energy solutions, protecting healthy rivers and communities, and building strong social movements. Deborah was a scientist at Environmental Defense Fund, founded Green Schools Initiative, and currently is Western States Senior Campaign Manager at the Union of Concerned Scientists, where she helped win California’s 100% clean energy law in 2018. 

ENVS 1046 Walking Body, Walking Mind: Philosophy on the Hoof
Walking upright with a bipedal gait emerged in early humans between 1.9 and 3.7 million years ago.  For the last few millennia and across many cultures and traditions walking has accompanied and inspired human endeavors of the mind and spirit. In this course we will engage the literatures of walking in the humanities and natural/social sciences, we will read and evaluate excerpts from classic “walking” texts in philosophy, religion, and eco-spirituality, and experience different modes of walking, including its social justice potential in resistance and reconciliation.  Suitable footwear and clothing for walking/hiking in January in Vermont required.  This course counts as a humanities cognate for Environmental Studies majors. PHL (B. Vitek)

Film and Media Culture

FMMC/HEBM 0258 Israeli Society through Films (In English)
In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel.  (formally HEBM 0250) AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

FMMC 0289 Podcast Seminar: Series Development
In this course we will work together to develop and produce original podcast series. Small teams will collaborate to develop a show idea, map a first season of episodes and produce a pilot episode of the podcast series. In preparation for this endeavor we will listen extensively to podcasts in a variety of formats and hear from show creators across the field of podcasting. Students will have the opportunity to plan and execute interviews, record round-table discussions, engage in field recordings, and ultimately develop a unique show voice and aesthetic. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0249, or FMMC 1134, or FMMC 1026, or FMMC/AMST 0261) 3 hrs. lect. (E. Davis)

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (D. Miranda)

FMMC 1031 Finding Your Voice Through Documentary
Whether using a cell phone or a professional camera, if you are an experienced filmmaker or a novice, there is no single way to tell a story and no single way to make a documentary film. Finding Your Voice Through Documentary is a film production class. In this course we will learn how to conceptualize, plan, and execute a short documentary film while also becoming proficient with foundational filmmaking skills. We will learn to critically analyze and create documentaries on topics that are of interest to us while encouraging development of our own voice, aesthetic, and intention. ART (This course will count towards the FMMC major) (J. Fendelman, visiting winter term instructor)

Joel Fendelman is an award-winning documentary and narrative filmmaker based out of NYC. He has made four feature films with his most recent documentary Man on Fire, having a national broadcast on PBS Independent Lens. Joel strives to embrace socially conscious stories that communicate the underlying connection between us all.

FMMC 1135 Script Development Workshop
This course is organized in conjunction with the Middlebury Script Lab, a screenwriting residential workshop that brings together emerging screenwriters and established industry professionals. The students will attend screenwriting workshops, masterclasses and informal meetings with visiting writers and producers. Students will explore ideation techniques, finding a story that is appropriate for a feature length script, outlining and pitching. We will discuss dramatic structure in depth and explore the high-concept potential of your screenplay ideas, examining their aesthetic as well as their business possibilities. We will assemble a pitching packet for your projects, including synopsis, logline, mood board and fantasy casting. At the conclusion of this class, you will have a solid outline supported by pitching materials and a clear overview of your material. The class makes an excellent preparation for students who want to take FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II or who plan to write a screenplay for their senior tutorial. (FMMC 0106 or instructor approval) ART (I. Uricaru)

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (B. Humbert, J. Weber)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS 0203 Performing Reproductive Politics: The Jane Collective on Stage
In this project-based course on reproductive politics, students will produce Paula Kamen’s play Jane: Abortion and the Underground. In so doing, students will learn about various reproductive issues by focusing on reproductive justice activism involving the creation of art and performance. Students may act in the play, or may do other work related to its production, such as working on set, costumes, lighting design, or creating a web presence related to the project. No prior experience required. ART, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS/WRPR 0288 Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, and poems by modern and contemporary writers, including James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, Adrienne Rich, Amy Tan, Junot Diaz, and Eli Clare. Students will write short critical and creative pieces and will develop one longer essay, a critical narrative. We will engage in writing workshops and contemplative activities. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion. CW, LIT, SOC (C. Wright)

Geology

GEOL 1006 Energy Resources: Geological Origins and Environmental Impacts
In this course we will discuss how different types of energy resources are formed by geological processes, how they are extracted and used, and how these activities impact the Earth’s environment.  We will discuss traditional fossil fuels such as oil, coal, and natural gas, as well as nuclear, wind, and solar power.  A portion of the class will focus on major energy issues facing the northeastern United States, such as the role of nuclear power in Vermont, hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) for natural gas in New York and Pennsylvania, and the wide spread installation of wind turbines and solar farms. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1120) SCI (D. West)

 GEOL 1009 Geology of National Parks
The collision of continents, the passage of glaciers, and time itself have sculpted this country, creating landscapes that have captivated humankind's attention for generations.  In this course we will develop the sequence of events that have led to the formation of many such natural wonders found in the country's national parks. We will proceed through lectures focused on basic geology and plate tectonic theory; textbook readings about specific parks; in-class and homework exercises that develop familiarity with important geologic materials and methods; and a number of virtual excursions to the parks. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1244) SCI (P. Manley)

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (B. Matthias, T. Sawin)

GRMN 1004 German Architecture and Power (in German)
Architecture reveals not only the aesthetic and formal preferences of the architect or client in charge, but grants insight into a society’s aspirations and power struggles. In this course we will study Berlin’s public buildings (and architectural proposals that never came to fruition) to understand the many complex forces that have shaped Germany’s old and new capital city. Recognizing that a building’s meaning changes over time depending on its cultural context, we will use semiotic models and historical background information to “read” a variety of iconic buildings as symbols for Germany’s identity formation processes. Examples to be scrutinized include the Brandenburg Gate, the various faces of the Reichstag, Hitler’s bombastic visions for the Welthauptstadt Germania, Stadtschloss/ Palast der Republik, Şehitlik Mosque, Jewish Museum, and others. ART, EUR, LNG (F. Feiereisen) 

Greek

GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I
This course is a rapid and intensive introduction to classical Greek for beginners. The aim of the course is to prepare students to read the major authors of Greek literature. In addition to a systematic study of grammar and syntax, we will also read excerpts from a variety of ancient authors. LNG ( M. Witkin, P. Evans, visiting winter term instructor)

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Tzuriel)

HEBM/FMMC 0258 Israeli Society through Films (In English)
In this course we will examine Israeli culture, society, and history through Israeli cinema. We will view and discuss fiction films and documentaries that address, present and reflect such themes as national and personal aspects of life in Israel, the centrality of war and the ongoing conflict, the lives of Palestinians, experiences of Holocaust survivors, the changing status of the kibbutz, ethnic minorities, gender relations, LGBT issues, and varied religious communities. By analyzing films, we will trace and explore core values, shared beliefs, diverse ideologies, unique points of view, social processes, and social relations in past and present-day Israel.  (formally HEBM 0250) AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)

History

HIST 0352 Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
In this course we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Using an array of primary and secondary sources, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will study the consumption of and attitudes toward specific foodstuffs, gauging the relevance of items like spices and coffee in the pre-modern period and of various dishes within modern nationalist constructions. We will also investigate how Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have historically used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. AAL, CMP, HIS, MDE, SOC (F. Armanios)

HIST 1028 Practicing Oral History
In this intensive, hands-on workshop, students will prepare for, conduct, and process their own oral histories. We will decide collectively on an overarching theme to investigate through the interviews, such as work, friendship, or mental illness. The first week will be introductory and theoretical. We will explore what oral history is, why historians do it, how the interview fits as an historical source among other sources, and the problem of memory. During the second week, students will focus on preparing for and conducting the interview. This will include conducting background research, developing consent forms, and refining interview techniques. The third week will be about making sense of the interview and exploring different ways to process it (indexing, abstracting, transcribing, storyboarding). Students will also write a reflective paper on the interview process. The fourth week will consist of historical presentations in which the interview is supplemented with other historical sources. The workshop will be grounded in the methodological concerns and questions of the discipline of history. It may also be of special interest to those interested in journalism, sociology, and anthropology (among other fields!). Students from any discipline, with prior oral history experience or none at all, are all welcome.  (L. Povitz)

HIST/JAPN 1029 Police Aesthetics in Japanese Film
In this course students will consider theories of police power in modern society while analyzing its representation in Japanese cinema. Each week we will begin with readings about one aspect of police power, and will then consider this aspect when analyzing a set of Japanese films. The objectives of the course are for students: (1) to gain a more multifaceted understanding of the police function in modern society, (2) to learn the general history of the Japanese police system, and (3) to cultivate an appreciation of Japanese film and its possibilities for critical reflection. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)

 History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design              
Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research as well as field trips to see innovation in the works, including house tours (both in construction and finished). Students will work in teams and individually to analyze existing buildings and design their own.  Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (S. Pottorf, visting winter term instructor)

HARC 1029 Photography and the Ethics of Witnessing
In this course we will consider photography as an eyewitness to violence and human suffering and the ethical position of the viewer. What does it mean to regard the pain of others? Can there be beauty in violence? Can a photograph alone speak truth? Can photographs initiate empathy or spark activism? Are we so bombarded with images of violence that we are immune to their power? To explore these questions, we will examine a series of case studies, from photography’s earliest documentation on the battlefield to contemporary examples of drone imagery used to wage war from a distance. We will also consider contemporary artists who integrate documentary photography into their practice as a form of resistance. ART (S. Rogers)

HARC 1030 Printmaking in the Time of Rembrandt
In this course we will study a selection of seventeenth-century Dutch prints from the collection of the Middlebury College Museum of Art, which includes etchings and engravings by artists such as Hendrick Golztius, Rembrandt van Rijn, Adriaen van Ostade, Nicolaes Berchem, and Cornelis Dusart, among others.  In this hands-on course students will learn how to research and write catalogue entries for a selection of these works by engaging directly with the objects in the collection.  By the end of the course, we will produce a small catalogue featuring our short essays. ART, EUR (C. Anderson)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 227 JusTalks at Middlebury
In this course students will develop the ability to facilitate the JusTalks First-Year Forums that will take place during winter term and spring semester. The First Year Forums are intended to (i) foster the habits of listening empathically and responding constructively when engaging in complex discussions that address topics such as privilege and difference, and (ii) develop greater awareness of how to contribute actively to building an inclusive community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students will develop in this course are consciously intended to be transferable to other settings and transformative for the Middlebury community. (formerly EDST 0227) Approval Only SOC (R. Wells)

 INTD 0274 AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: Construction Documents
Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, and affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to finalize and generate the construction documentation for the housing unit design generated in HARC 0371 & INTD 0273. A schedule of deliverables with an accompanying set of deadlines will need to be met to allow for construction to start in spring 2019. The studio components include final architectural and constructional detailing; building code compliance; building permitting finalization; physical and CAD modeling; structural coordination; and construction specifications.  Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (S. Kredell)

INTD 1014 American Sign Language (ASL)
In this course we will introduce American Sign Language (ASL). It is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, and describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (J. Pirone, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2020
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, impact-focused learning. Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management. Acceptance into MiddCORE 2020 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter. A limited amount of financial aid is available to students who might otherwise be unable to enroll due to work-study or other financial obligations. Applications must be received by 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 1. Decisions will be emailed by 8 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 3. (Pass/Fail; Approval Required) (C. Brown).

 INTD/ENAM 1075 Debating Global Literature
In this course we will analyze literary texts in the context of current debates on globalization, world literature, colonial and postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, and gender studies. Readings will include Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Helon Habila’s Oil On Water, C. N. Adichie’s “Jumping Monkey Hill,” and Madeleine Thien’s Certainty, as well as theoretical readings from the fields of postcolonial studies, politics, history, development studies, and anthropology.  AAL, LIT, SOA, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

INTD/EDST 1077 Rural Decline and the Future of Vermont Public Schools
In this course students will examine how the stresses created by Vermont’s shrinking rural population affect the future planning,  governance, and politics regarding local public schools.  Students will conduct research projects to better understand the increasing pressures and realities local districts face regarding such issues as enrollment declines, inequitable distribution of access and resources, increasing student needs, significant facility upgrade or repair needs, community engagement and local control, and state and local property taxes.  By the end of the course, we will have weighed competing interests, collated and compared a wide range of relevant data, and considered some solutions. (A. McGlashan, Director of Academic Outreach and Special Projects CCI)

INTD 1078 Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation and Disarmament Verification: Challenges and Opportunities
In this interdisciplinary course and table-top simulation exercise, students will develop a basic understanding of the political, legal, and technical concepts underpinning nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament verification mechanisms. Participating students will utilize this knowledge and newly acquired skills to role-play decision makers in a relevant security and decision-making process with the goal of negotiating a response to a critical nuclear proliferation concern. Students will gain insights into the challenges associated with past and existing verification mechanisms, and examine ways to further strengthen these capabilities, including through the use of new tools such as geospatial imagery and 3D modeling.  Students will also have the opportunity to virtually interact with a number of renowned policy experts, national and international diplomats, and verification-related scientists and technical experts. Course material will include relevant printed and electronic resources, online materials, videos, and films. (J. du Preez, MIIS Faculty)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Many people have great ideas for new products or services, but few are willing and able to take the steps necessary to make these ideas a reality. Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Through lecture, class discussion, and hands-on mentoring, students will bring a project proposal from concept to launch quickly and effectively. Key concepts that will be taught include: opportunity analysis, financial planning, team building, and fundraising. Classwork will be supplemented with guest visits from notable entrepreneurs. To qualify for this class, each student must have a business idea—for profit or not for profit—for which they care passionately and are willing to commit the time and energy necessary to give the startup a real chance at success. Students must submit a short project proposal that can be found at go/entrepreneurs, which will ask you to describe in less than 500 words 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2). the product or solution you propose to solve this problem; and 3). why you are well suited to tackle this project.  Please email hneuwirth@middlebury.edu  with any questions  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury and Sam Roach Gerber, visiting winter term instructors)

INTD/EDST 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Students will learn and intensively practice basic sitting and walking meditation. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan, and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393 or EDST/INTD 0125), AAL, NOA (J. Huddleston)

John Huddleston retired from the Studio Art Program in 2017. For the last five years he also taught mindfulness courses at the college.

INTD/ENAM 1135 British Popular Culture
George Orwell once described the English in terms of their fondness for “the pub, the football match, the back garden, the fireside, and the ‘nice cup of tea'." But what would he have made of the Sex Pistols or Amy Winehouse? In this course we will trace a particular arc through post-1945 British popular culture in order to ask how we got from Orwell to The Office, from the Rolling Stones to Radiohead. We will ask how film, music, and TV prepared the ground for important episodes in British history: the “special relationship” with the United States, the modernization of sexuality, the transformation from welfare state to free market capitalism, the slow passage toward a multicultural society. ART, EUR, SOC (B. Graves)

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor.  AAL, LNG, SAF (W. Roki, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera is an intellectual entrepreneur and an educator. She was the recipient of the 2010 Carolina Chiron Award for excellent teaching & dedication to students, an award inspired by the late Randy Pausch’s famous last lecture. Gave her own version of a last lecture entitled, “Humanizing the continent of Africa: Demystifying Myths & Stereotypes that Encroach it”. Her writings span diverse fields-The intersection of pathogens and women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, Gender, and African languages.

INTD 1159 Building the Japanese Tea House
In this course we will build the timber frame of a traditional Japanese tea house, using the construction as a backdrop for exploring the technical aspects of Japanese carpentry and the cultural underpinnings of apprentice learning.  Traditional craft apprenticeships are still very much the norm in Japan - standing in stark contrast with our Western notions of teaching and learning.  Exploring how apprenticeship and tea ceremony reflect aspects of Buddhist training will shine a light on students’ accepted notions of learning.  Readings will cover technical aspects of Japanese carpentry and its history and traditions, with particular emphasis on the pedagogy of craft training.  Students will keep a journal and write an 8-10 page final paper. ART, AAL, NOA (D. Brooks, visiting winter term instructor)

Douglas Brooks is a boatbuilder, writer, and researcher living in Vergennes, Vermont. He has studied Japanese boatbuilding since 1996, apprenticing with seven teachers from throughout Japan and has authored four books on Japanese boatbuilding.

INTD 1182 Media Representation of Disability in the US
In this seminar-style, project-based course, we will critically engage with a wide array of representations of disability, including advertisements, news, political cartoons, fundraising telethons, social media, and art created by disabled people. We will ask: what stereotypes and cultural beliefs shape these representations? To create our frameworks and extend our thinking, we will engage with films, blogs, and scholarly and activist writing. Because disability representations never exist in a vacuum, we also will pay close attention to issues of power and privilege and to the connections between disability, race, gender, class, and sexuality. SOC (E. Clare, visiting winter term instructor)

Eli Clare is a community-based writer, activist, and teacher. His most recent book is Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure, and he has published in many periodicals and anthologies. He speaks, teaches, and facilitates all over the United States and Canada at conferences, community events, and colleges about disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice.

INTD 1184 State Supreme Courts: How They Work and When They Don't
In this course we will explore how cases are developed in the trial courts and presented on appeal in the Vermont Supreme Court.  Taught by two recently retired Justices, the course will include a substantive component focused primarily on Vermont Constitutional law and trial and appellate procedure, and an experiential component in which students will participate in a moot appellate court presentation, including submitting a written argument in a “brief” and making an oral argument to a “bench” of one or more judges.  Students will examine in depth the briefs, oral arguments, and resulting decisions for two recently decided Vermont Supreme Court cases, and will attend the arguments for actual cases being heard on campus by the Vermont Supreme Court.  Having read and discussed the briefs and issues in those cases, students will meet with the Justices of the Court and the lawyers who presented arguments.  Finally, students will read about and discuss “hot topics” in the United States’ legal and justice system, including how judges are selected and the length of judicial terms, the cost and availability of legal services, and the future of the legal profession. AMR, NOR, SOC (Justice J. Dooley, Justice M. Skoglund, visiting winter term instructors)

 Justice Marilyn Skoglund worked for 14 years at the Office of the Attorney General, serving as Chief of the Civil Division and of the Public Protection Division before becoming a trial court judge in 1994.  In 1997 she was sworn in as Associate Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, a position she held until September of 2019 when she retired. 

INTD 1189 Regions of France: Culture, Castles, & Wine
France is a patchwork of many regions, each boasting its own identity through its history and folklore, music and language, food and wine. In this course we will explore several French regions, including Brittany, the Loire Valley and Provence: their landscapes, economic and cultural history, culinary traditions—the notion of terroir—and the way in which they are portrayed in cinema and literature (including two novels by Provençal author Marcel Pagnol). Students will research the history, culture, and attributes of their own chosen or favorite region. [course taught in English] EUR (C. Frankel, visiting winter term instructor)

A Middlebury graduate (’79) now living in Brittany, Charles Frankel has written several books on French landscapes and terroir.

INTD 1195 Engendering Writing
Texts are written by someone, about someone, and for someone, and we often make assumptions about this “someone.” We might mistakenly presume that Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own is an emotional, confessional text because it is written by a woman, while Prince Jussuf of Thebes (Else Lasker-Schüler) or Tian (Karoline von Günderrode) are male identities with easy access to public, intellectual ideas. In this course we will consider how gender is bound up with the practices of reading and writing. For students of any gender, this course will explore how identity is a literal cultural construction rather than a biological fact. By breaking down the texts and contexts in which the idea of “woman” is created (in the poetry of Droste-Hülshoff and Angelou, the short prose of Tawada, Özdamar, and Lorde, and in three recent films), we will discover how a concept can be presumptuous and constraining, but also challenged and subverted by critical thinking and creative writing. SOC (J. Dury-Agri, visiting winter term instructor)

Jarrett Dury-Agri is an alumnus of Middlebury College (’12 Literary Studies) currently pursuing a Ph.D. in German literature at the University of California, Berkeley. A Fulbright Fellowship and research on the European avant-garde at Dartmouth College (M.A. ’14 Comparative Literature) introduced him to the poetry of women Expressionist writers, whom he translates when he is not reading, making art, or hiking.

INTD 1196 Introduction to Media and Minorities
In this course we will learn a process for understanding how the media portray minorities. Students will be introduced to techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab that enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how social groups as diverse as immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will learn how to download bulk newspaper data from Lexis-Nexis, to process it using python notebooks, and to statistically analyze it using Stata as they work on a concrete project of their choice. DED (E. Bleich)

INTD 1201 The Trial of Jon Snow: An Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
Jon Snow is the prime suspect in a homicide being investigated by the Vermont Special Investigations Unit.  What charges will be filed? What will his defense be? In this course we will familiarize students with the Vermont Criminal Justice system through the lens of his case. Students will be asked to view and analyze evidence, examine trial issues surrounding competency to stand trial, self-defense and the voluntariness of confessions. These topics will be explored both through lecture and through practical experience. The course will culminate with the trial of Jon Snow.  (P. Bevere, visiting winter term instructor)

I am a Deputy State’s Attorney with the Addison County State’s Attorney’s Office and have experience handling cases ranging from domestic and sexual assaults to homicides.  I have been an attorney for 18 years, with over 12 years of experience as a prosecutor in both Vermont and Massachusetts.

 INTD 1203 Health Policy in Action
This course is an academic internship course that combines a four day/week internship at a Vermont health care organization with one day/week in the classroom. Students will be assigned a specific research project (designed in advance by the faculty member and the internship sponsor) that must be completed by the end of the term. Class time will be spend debriefing the internship experience, building skills relevant to health policy analysis and working on the research project. Grading will based on participation, evaluation by internship sponsor, evidence of personal growth, and performance on final research project. (Approval Only, please contact the professor for more information) SOC (J. Holmes)

INTD 1205 Sports Journalism in a Cultural Context
While the drumbeat that “newspapers and magazines are dead” goes on, sports journalism is actually flourishing on both traditional and digital media platforms. In this course we will examine that craft, as well as the cultural canvas upon which it is written, with the goal of producing a game story, an opinion piece, and a longform feature piece by term’s end. To achieve that, students will (a) cover campus sporting events and personalities; (b) deconstruct stories on a variety of subjects such as race, cultural identity, gender politics, student-athlete unionism, and violence on and off the field, (c) learn about interviewing and story organization techniques; (d) hear live and via video conference from writers who produced the pieces we will study; and (e) view documentary films relevant to the study of sports in a cultural context. LIT (J. McCallum, visiting winter term instructor)

 Jack McCallum was a senior writer at Sports Illustrated for thirty years and is still a Special Contributor to the magazine. He is the author of thirteen books and in 2005 was elected to the writers’ wing of the Basketball Hall of Fame.

INTD 1208 The International Commodity Business
Civilization has been moving natural resources for commercial purposes for thousands of years. In this course we will study the development of the international commodity trade. The course will look at why humans would move a natural resource from one place to another, addressed through four main areas of inquiry: (1) the innovations which have contributed to global resource trade (commodity extraction, waterborne transport, creation of financial exchanges); (2)  the effects that these commercial imperatives have on developing economies- both positive and negative, with a particular focus on the ‘commodity curse’;  (3)  how the introduction of an imported commodity can fundamentally alter societal behavior; and  (4)  the global economics of commodity markets, commodity indexes around the world, and how commercial developments are continually disrupting societies’ demand habits. SOC (C. Mulliken, visiting winter term instructor)

Christopher Mulliken received his Masters Degree in International Relations and Trade in 1987, and since that time has worked in the international Oil and Gas trading business, in both Trading and Management positions.

INTD 1211 Climate Fictions
In a moment when the effects of global warming are being felt around the world, what purpose can fictional accounts of climate change serve? In this course, we will explore how the growing genre of “climate fiction” attempts to render the droughts, floods, forest fires, and storms of our warming world. Reading stories that range from apocalyptic to cautiously optimistic, we will ultimately consider how different narratives shape our imagination of the planet’s future. Primary works will include Roland Emmerich’s film The Day After Tomorrow, Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140, and selections from the anthology Loosed Upon the World. LIT (M. Gaffney, visiting winter term instructor)

Michael Gaffney is a Ph.D. candidate in the Program in Literature at Duke University, where his teaching and research focuses on the environmental humanities. He received a B.A. from Middlebury College in 2013.

INTD 1212 Statistical Models of the Stock Market
In this course we will learn about quantitative finance and the stock market specifically.  We will focus on how the stock market works and what it means to be a “quant.”  Students will use Matlab extensively or another statistical package to build models that predict future stock movements.  Morning lectures/discussions will focus on the workings of the stock market and the inefficiencies that might be present.  In afternoon lab sessions and as homework, students will work by themselves or in teams (with the instructor’s help) to build actual models of future stock prices.  Students will learn not only how to build those models but also how to evaluate how effective they are.  Previous coding experience or taking a Matlab tutorial before the class starts is useful, but not required. (S. Smallwood, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1216 Discovering the Clown
In this physical theatre course students will discover the joy of being onstage, develop a personal relationship with the comic world, and find pleasure in a direct engagement with an audience. The study of theatrical clown helps connect students to the spontaneous, vulnerable, and generous impulses of their work. Through games, songs, improvisation, individual exercises, personal writing, and readings we will create a supportive ensemble to encourage each student to succeed in their unique way. Failure is encouraged. It's funny. And not funny. But that’s funny, too. ART ( J. Proctor, visiting winter term instructor)

Julia Proctor is an actor, the founder and director of Clown Gym, a maker of devised theatrical work, and an educator. She is a graduate of Middlebury College, has a Master of Fine Arts in Classical Acting from GWU, and has studied with some of the most prestigious clown teachers in the world. 

INTD 1217 Gender and Access to Health Care in Subsaharan Africa
In this course we will examine how gender issues impact access to health care in Sub-Saharan Africa. In September 2000, the international community adopted the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set by the United Nations Millennium Declaration. Students will analyze and measure how successful some African nations have been in dealing with the following four MDGs: to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health; and to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. We will study from an anthropological perspective the health care systems of Cameroon and Burkina Faso to assess how gender has shaped access to health care in these two countries and beyond. AAL, CMP, SAF, SOC (E. Kouokam, visiting winter term instructor)

Estelle Kouokam is a lecturer in Anthropology at the Université Catholique d’Afrique Centrale (UCAC)/Catholic University of Central Africa in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

INTD 1220 Controlling the Narrative: Legal, Diplomatic, and Political Advocacy
In this course we will examine how advocates in a range of disciplines – law, diplomacy and government relations – employ narrative arts to achieve their ends.  The class will review recent high-profile cases and consider how the advocates utilized persuasion strategies and tactics to attain success.  The class’ focus on rhetorical techniques will be complemented by engagement with professionals who will share their experiences and perspectives.  Each student will prepare a project examining how success was achieved in an adversarial setting.  (K. Gagne, visiting winter term instructor)

Kim Gagné has amassed deep experience as an advocate in a career spanning the worlds of law, diplomacy and government relations.  Kim’s advocacy experiences include partnership at a Washington white collar criminal defense firm; service as a Foreign Service Officer in Haiti and Saudi Arabia and at the U.S. Mission to the European Union; and senior-level service in Microsoft’s legal and corporate affairs group in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia.  He is currently a Senior Counselor with the strategic communications firm APCO Worldwide. 

INTD 1221 The Russian Religious Experience
We will examine selected aspects of Russian Orthodoxy: its doctrine, the history of the Russian church, its art (icons), its music (Byzantine chant), and its literature (including saints’ lives and sermons). We will also read selected stories by major 19th century writers that employ religious themes (including those by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy). Students will select one aspect of the Russian religious experience and write a research paper. Readings and films will be chosen to support our inquiry. EUR, PHL (M. Katz)

Michael Katz is C.V. Starr Professor Emeritus of Russian and East European Studies at Middlebury College. He retired from full-time teaching in 2010.

INTD 1222 Karst and Cave Geology
This course will provide an overview of diverse aspects of a peculiar landscape known as “karst,” from surface geomorphology to caves as archives of past climate conditions. Through in-class discussions and exercises, students will learn about karst hydrology, cave development, and how cave formations like stalagmites are created and can be used to generate paleoclimate records. A week-long fieldtrip to Mammoth Cave National Park will allow students to study the characteristic morphological features of both surface and subsurface karst. Students will also gain experience in fieldwork such as karst spring monitoring or microclimate studies of caves. Travel costs are covered.  Questions about travel and financial or time implications of missed work/practice should be directed to the Chair. (Any lab-based 100-level Geology course or permission from Jeff Munroe) SCI (G. Koltai, visiting winter term instructor)

Gabriella Koltai is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. Her research focuses on caves and the potential of speleothems as paleoenvironmental archives.

INTD 1223 Leadership: Building a Decision-Making Framework for Life
College was the goal. Time is passing quickly. How will you prepare for the future? In this course students will develop a decision-making framework for life by exploring their core values and aspirations, crafting a personal narrative, and identifying longer-term goals. We will discuss key components of effective leadership and build a leadership toolkit that includes goal setting, risk assessment, storytelling, active listening, and asking powerful questions. Reading assignments – from Aristotle to Drucker – and writing assignments will complement class discussions, interactive exercises, oral presentations, and interview practice. Guest speakers will participate and share their leadership stories, insights, and lessons learned.  (C. Lee, visiting winter term instructor)

Catherine has spent her career leading business development and strategy execution for companies, organizations and teams focused on finding new pathways to improve performance and achieve growth. Catherine has been working in the finance, maritime, and banking industries and has lived and worked in the UK, Europe, and Asia.

INTD 1224 Empowerment or Exploitation? Engaging Communities in the Pursuit of Better Health
Sustained progress in global health and development requires the participation of target communities. Vaccines, for instance, will themselves do no good if caregivers refuse to vaccinate their children. In this course, we will explore the role of communities in the pursuit of improved health – a state often pre-defined by outsiders without direct community consultation. The course will focus specifically on the evolving role of community health workers within global health and development agendas, emphasizing therein the fine line we tread (as global health policy makers, implementers, and donors) between empowering and exploiting the communities on whose participation our success relies. SOC (H. Napier, visiting winter term instructor)

Since 2009, Harriet has studied, supported, and advocated for community health systems across the globe, focusing specifically on community health policy, design, implementation, and financing. In her current role on the global malaria team at Clinton Health Access Initiative, Harriet supports countries across sub-Saharan Africa, the Greater Mekong Sub-region, and Mesoamerica to holistically understand and optimally engage community health worker networks as key partners in the fight to eliminate malaria. Harriet holds a Master of Science in Public Health with a focus on community health systems from Johns Hopkins University, and a BA in anthropology from Middlebury College.

INTD 1225 Telling Science Stories: Science Communication for the Public
In this course, we will engage with theories and practices for communicating science to public audiences. Through learning about audience, visual design, and storytelling, we will improve our ability to communicate science to non-specialists. Drawing on examples from Radio Lab and popular science writers, we will create a final project modeled after the “Flame Challenge”—an international competition in which scientists make their work accessible to non-specialists. Students will work in teams to create a multimodal story about scientific discoveries taking place at Middlebury. This course will include field trips to museums in Burlington and other engaged learning. (K. O'Brien, visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Katherine O’Brien is outreach liaison at the Museum of Biological Diversity at The Ohio State University. She is an active member of the Columbus science community and hosts programs at the Center of Science and Industry (CoSI) and STEAM Factory, including Columbus Science Pub.

INTD 1226 College Life: Traditions, Rituals and Ceremony
In this course we will use theory to examine common events and activities at college, such as football games, singing the alma mater, and Middlebury-specific examples such as passing Gamaliel Painter’s cane at opening convocation and the Feb celebration ski-down. We will read, discuss, and apply the work of major theorists (e.g., V. Turner, S. Tambiah, Durkheim, Weber, and others) to contemporary rituals, traditions, and ceremonies that are defining parts of college life.  Discussion and assignments are designed to help gain a deeper understanding of the changing roles that tradition plays for us, and to raise awareness of behaviors that go under-examined in our perennial, communal life. (M. Orten, visiting winter term instructor)

Mark Orten is the Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life and Director of the Scott Center

INTD 1228 Introduction to Medical Ethics and Bioethics
This course will introduce students to the field of bioethics with specific attention to common ethical problems found in the modern practice of medicine.  We will start by examining conventional Western bioethical normative claims about the primacy of autonomy, and its relationship to beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice.  We will use real-world case studies to bring out how genuine bioethical dilemmas consistently force us to confront competing, important human values.  Controversial topics may include euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, research, and decision-making for children and incapacitated patients.  The course will be faculty led/facilitated but grounded in class discussion and will require students’ close reading of a variety of materials prior to each class.  SOC (S. Sayeed, visiting winter term instructor)

INTD 1229 Listening & Speaking: A Rhetoric Lab
Rhetoric is the tool humans use to seek justice, build consensus, and make change. It’s also how we argue, advertise, and mislead, which makes the capacity to analyze and act rhetorically essential to engaged citizenship. In our rhetoric lab, we will explore the twin arts of listening and speaking: how can we listen deeply, across differences, and how can a heightened awareness of the audience and its values help us communicate more persuasively? Our teachers will include rhetoricians from Aristotle to Obama, Shakespeare to Sarah Silverman; ultimately, in your final orations, you and your classmates will become teachers to each other. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1532) ART (D. Yeaton)

INTD 1230 Policing the Globe
From the Casbah of Algiers to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, police militarization has become one of the key features of the contemporary security state across much of the world. In order to better grasp this global phenomenon, we will adopt a global historical approach. We will trace the historical origins of police militarization by investigating the rise of modern police forces in the nineteenth century, the history of European colonialism, decolonization, and the Cold War. Finally, we will finish with a study of the contemporary policing of dissent. Students will select a contemporary topic in policing and write a research paper, make a podcast, create a website, or make a documentary video. (not open to students who have taken HIST 1044) CMP, HIS, SOC (A. Prakash)

INTD 1231 Financial Literacy & Inequality
This course will apply an interdisciplinary approach to issues of financial literacy, financial exclusion, and financial inequality.  Topics relating to the specified domains include intergenerational equity, retirement security, consumer debt, individual taxation, and economic development.  These concepts provide a disciplined way of thinking about personal financial decisions while simultaneously framing how we think about retirement security and issues of financial equity writ large. (T. Nguyen, W. Jackson)

INTN 1052 Coaching and Issues in Sports
In this team-taught course we will examine coaching and its impact on students from elementary school through the  college level. Students will develop a portfolio that will include coaching philosophy, sport psychology, physiology, and sport pedagogy. Each student will learn teaching techniques for his or her sport or sports of interest. Several guest speakers will lead discussions on current issues happening in the world of sports. Outside reading with response papers, in class participation, and a final portfolio will determine the grade. (Open to Juniors and Seniors only). (B. Beaney, visiting winter term instructor)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Van Order, P. Zupan)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (O. Milutin, M. Takahashi)

JAPN/HIST 1029 Police Aesthetics in Japanese Film
In this course students will consider theories of police power in modern society while analyzing its representation in Japanese cinema. Each week we will begin with readings about one aspect of police power, and will then consider this aspect when analyzing a set of Japanese films. The objectives of the course are for students: (1) to gain a more multifaceted understanding of the police function in modern society, (2) to learn the general history of the Japanese police system, and (3) to cultivate an appreciation of Japanese film and its possibilities for critical reflection. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)

LATIN

Linguistics

LNGT/EDST 0107 Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003)  (S. Shapiro)

LNGT/SPAN 1304 Mayan Language Revitalization
This course is specifically designed for students accompanying Professor Baird to Guatemala in January 2020. Students will spend the first week of the term on campus where they will learn about language revitalization strategies, the social and historic context of contact between Spanish and Mayan languages and cultures, and receive a brief introduction to the Mayan language K’ichee’. Afterwards, students will travel to Guatemala in order to collaborate with locals in a language revitalization campaign. This collaboration will include the planning and production of national radio programs, visits to local schools, and the creation and dissemination of materials. Only students that have met all of the requirements may enroll in this class. Requirements include at least 1 previous course in Spanish (300 and above), and participation in all required meetings during the Fall 2019 semester. Please note:  This course had to be pre-enrolled because of the substantial planning and logistics involved. The course is therefore already full.  However, students interested in this topic or in pursuing future research in this area should contact Prof. Baird to inquire about opportunities. (Approval only) AAL, AMR, LNG, SOC (B. Baird)

 

Luso Hispanic Studies

SPAN 1301 Hispanic Horror Cinema
In this course we will study horror films from Spain, Mexico, the United States, Argentina, and Cuba in order to understand how Hispanic filmmakers employ intertextual horror esthetics to create genre films. The films we will consider focus on zombies (Rec, Planet Terror, Juan of the Dead), vampires (Cronos, Vampires in Havana), ghosts  (The Devil's Backbone, The Others), and misogynist stalkers (Thesis, Sleep Tight). We will discuss both the conservative and transgressive aspects of this emerging genre in transnational Hispanic cinema, focusing specifically on how these films reflect the evolving political and ideological dynamics of their respective national cultures. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students who have taken SPAN 1111. ART, LNG (E. Garcia)

SPAN/LNGT 1304 Mayan Language Revitalization
This course is specifically designed for students accompanying Professor Baird to Guatemala in January 2020. Students will spend the first week of the term on campus where they will learn about language revitalization strategies, the social and historic context of contact between Spanish and Mayan languages and cultures, and receive a brief introduction to the Mayan language K’ichee’. Afterwards, students will travel to Guatemala in order to collaborate with locals in a language revitalization campaign. This collaboration will include the planning and production of national radio programs, visits to local schools, and the creation and dissemination of materials. Only students that have met all of the requirements may enroll in this class. Requirements include at least 1 previous course in Spanish (300 and above), and participation in all required meetings during the Fall 2019 semester. Please note:  This course had to be pre-enrolled because of the substantial planning and logistics involved. The course is therefore already full.  However, students interested in this topic or in pursuing future research in this area should contact Prof. Baird to inquire about opportunities. (Approval only) AAL, AMR, LNG, SOC (B. Baird)

SPAN 1353 Borges' Ficciones
The Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) is arguably one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. In this course we will take a deep look at one of his major works: the short story collection Ficciones (1941). By using the technique of close reading, we will define Borges’ main themes in this book and analyze their connections with history and philosophy. We will also examine Borges’ literary sources and cultural legacy. This course will be taught in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level, or by waiver). AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (M. Higa)

Music

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (D. Anderson, C. Christenson, M.J. Austin visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson (director) Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 13th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Les Misérables (2014), Ragtime (2015), Chicago (2016) and City of Angels (2017).   Mary Jane Austin will be joining them as the conductor.

MUSC 1025 Electronic Music: Digital Audio Synthesis & Production
In this intensive course taught exclusively in Ableton Live, we will explore the fundamentals of digital audio synthesis and electronic music production. In the context of an original project, each student will learn to design sounds, warp and process audio samples, arrange MIDI, deploy effects, automate parameters, and creatively utilize these skills in tandem. We will also delve into the basic principles of digital acoustics, signal flow, mix engineering, and emulation theory within software synthesizers. Final projects will be presented in a public exhibition at end of term. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (not open to students who have taken MUSC 0212) (Approval required; please contact Jack Tipper at atipper@middlebury.edu) ART (J. Tipper, visiting winter term instructor)

Jack Tipper ’15.5 is an independent electronic music producer and multidisciplinary artist based in downtown Los Angeles. He currently releases music under his professional moniker “Aotu”.

MUSC 1026 New Century - New Voices: Composition Today
We will consider how new technologies and the proliferation of notation systems has enabled more people to engage in the practice of music composition. We will discuss the dynamics of group improvisation, improvisation as brainstorming, and the change in temporal perception due to improvisational practice.  We will read texts such as Daniel J, Levitin’s This Is Your Brain on Music, John Cage’s Silence, and Pauline Oliveros’ Deep Listening.  Students will scheme and write their own compositions for instrumentation to be determined later. The class will culminate in a recital.  Open to all students, regardless of musical background.  ART (M. Taylor, E. Sharp visiting artist in residence)

 

Philosophy

PHIL 0214 Science and Society
Scientific theories are not developed in a vacuum. Social circumstances influence the practice of science, and science, in turn, influences how we organize ourselves as a society. In this course will investigate both directions of the relationship between science and society. We will ask such questions as: how do the values of society drive scientific research? What do we mean when we claim that science is 'objective' and what do we expect of an objective science? Can there be 'good' politically-motivated science, or does this conflict with the norms of 'good' science? How important is science as a way of bettering society? Do scientists bear an extra burden of responsibility when they generate scientific results of particular social significance (such as the development of the atomic bomb, or the development of techniques of cloning)? We will examine particular cases of socially significant scientific research, and we will consider larger philosophical questions concerning the status of science as a source of knowledge. PHL, SOC (H. Grasswick)

PHIL 0220 Knowledge and Reality
This course will introduce students to central issues in epistemology (the philosophical study of knowledge) and metaphysics (the philosophical study of reality). We will examine philosophical answers to some of the following questions: What is knowledge? How do we know what we know? How does knowledge differ from mere opinion? Does reality exist independently of our minds? When is it rational to believe something? What is the nature of time, causality, and possibility? Are our actions freely chosen or determined by natural forces? Do abstract entities-such as numbers and universals-exist? PHL (P. Tan)

Phyiscs

PHYS 0220 Introduction to Mathematica
Mathematica is a scientific software application that consists of a flexible high-level programming language with thousands of powerful built-in functions for symbolic, numeric, and graphical computation typical of physics and other quantitative fields.  Undergraduates can use Mathematica for coursework, senior projects, and throughout their professional careers.  In this course we will focus on the principles at the core of Mathematica and how these principles unify such a great range of computational capabilities. (PHYS 0109 and 0110; Recommended: MATH 0200 and a traditional “computer programming course” in high school or college) DED, SCI (J. Dunham)

Political Science

PSCI 1020 American Power: Soft, Hard, or Smart
Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, turmoil in the Middle East and Venezuela, and Russian expansionism have raised important questions about how the United States should use power to defend its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since WWII.  Using selected case studies, we will examine pro/con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with class debate and discussion, as well as reviews of relevant daily news reports written and presented by class members. AMR, NOR, SOC (S. Sloan, visiting winter term instructor)

Stanley R. Sloan, a retired U.S. government foreign and defense policy specialist, currently a Visiting Scholar in Political Science at Middlebury, has taught alternating Winter Term courses on Euro-Atlantic Relations and on American Power since 2005.  He lectures widely in Europe and the United States and is author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, reports for Congress and books including most recently Transatlantic Traumas: Has illiberalism brought the West to the brink of collapse? (Manchester University Press, 2018) and Defense of the West (Manchester University Press, 2016).

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Douglas, visiting winter term instructor)

James Douglas, ’72, successfully sought the office of Governor in 2002 and was inaugurated as the 8oth Governor of Vermont in January, 2003.  He was re-elected in 2004, 2006, and 2008.

PSCI 1032 The Politics of Big Technology
What goes on in Silicon Valley and what goes on in Washington D.C. (as well as other capitals) affect each other. The increasing salience of technology in society means that the actions of and reactions to major technology firms have become inescapably political. In this course we will analyze the intersection between big technology firms and politics by examining concerns around privacy, the use of social media for political purposes, technology’s impact on jobs and inequality, and technology firms’ place in geopolitics. SOC (G. Winslett)

PSCI 1165 Negotiations that Transformed the 20th Century
Students will explore the historical context, actions of participants, and global consequences of six transformative 20th century negotiations:  (1) WWI Versailles Peace  Conference, 1919, (2) Munich accord, 1938, (3) U.S.-Japan pre-Pearl Harbor negotiations, 1941, (4) Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962, (5) Vietnam War negotiations, 1969-73, and (6) the Egypt-Israel Camp David Accord, 1978. Besides their historical significance, the six cases provide informative examples of different types of diplomacy: multilateral negotiation, appeasement vs. deterrence, cross-cultural communication, bargaining in a nuclear crisis, inter-ally negotiations, and high-level mediation. We will read historical accounts and participant memoirs, and listen to recordings of participant discussions. HIS, SOC (R. Leng, visiting winter term instructor)

Russell  Leng is James Jermain Professor Emeritus of Political Economy and International Law.

PSCI 1168 Reading Herodotus
"Herodotus of Halicarnassus here displays his inquiry, so that human achievements may not become forgotten in time, and great and marvelous deeds—some displayed by Greeks, some by barbarians—may not be without their glory; and especially to show  why the two peoples fought with each other.”  So begins Herodotus’ “Inquiries,” aka “Histories.”  Herodotus’ accounts of  Egypt, Scythia, Lydia, Babylonia, Mesopotamia, and Libya (books I-IV) lay the foundation for his account of the Persian Wars (V-IX).  The relation between Greekness and human freedom emerges as the theme of that war. EUR, HIS, LIT (M. Dry)

Psychology

PSYC 1020 Moral Minds
We have all “taken one for the team,” stood loyally by friends, overcome desires to cheat, and helped others before ourselves. We have also all stretched the truth to make ourselves look better, treated others intolerantly, and given preferential treatment to a friend. What motivates us to act in these moral and immoral ways? Are these actions guided by emotion or by reason? Are certain moral ideals respected by people universally? What makes something “moral” in the first place? In this course, we will grapple with these issues by exploring moral psychology from developmental, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives in psychology using primary sources. We will apply theories and concepts in moral psychology to Supreme Court cases, while also becoming attuned to the subtle, often unnoticed patterning of moral psychology in our everyday lives. We will use a variety of formats to address these issues, including theoretical and empirical readings, student-led discussions, essays, small group projects, and oral presentations.   This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology & Neuroscience majors. SOC (A. DiBianca Fasoli)

PSYC 1030 Forensic Psychology and Criminal Behavior
This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of forensic psychology through the in-depth study of criminal behavior. Topics will include developmental factors for criminality, risk assessment and dangerousness, psychopathy, criminal profiling (with a focus on perpetrators of serious crimes), extremism and terrorism, and victimology and treatment. The material will be considered from a range of theoretical perspectives. We will read books, chapters, articles, and direct source material, and watch a few films. The class will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Students will have opportunities to focus on areas of specific interest.  This course will count as a PSYC elective.  (PSYC 0105 or equivalent) SOC (J. Nelson, visiting winter term instructor)

Religion

RELI 1045 #blessed: American Prosperity Religion
tfw the vending machine gives you two snacks instead of one #cookies #blessed. Critics allege that thinking God cares about your personal prosperity exposes the rotting core of American late capitalism. But American nationalism is also rooted in God’s providence. How should we grapple with this American ambivalence toward prosperity and religion? In this class, we will use critical media theory to understand how capitalism cultivates a diversity of religious attitudes toward prosperity. While our focus will be contemporary media from the anglophone United States, we will explore comparable instances from Brazil and other Latin American countries in translation. AMR, NOR, PHL, SOC (J. Doran)

RELI 1047 The Seven Deadly Sins in Theology, Art and Literature
In this course we will study the medieval tradition of the Seven Deadly Sins and their expression in theology, art and literature. Among the authors we will read are Aquinas, Shakespeare, and W.H. Auden. We will view and study films and music that allude to this list of sins. LIT, PHL (S. Goldman)

RELI 1075 Religion and Politics in Iran
“The Islamic revolution of 1979, led by Ayatollah Khomeini, propelled Iran to the position of the arch-nemesis of the United States in the region. As a result of hostile media coverage, there is much mis-understanding that pervades our understanding of the post-revolutionary Iran. In this course we will try to improve this understanding by digging deeper in the history of Iran as well as examining various aspects of contemporary Iranian society such as media, politics, and religion.” AAL, MDE, PHL (A. Anzali)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (V. Juharvan, S. Rodonova)

Sociology

SOCI 1001 Counting the U.S.: The 2020 Census
In 2020 the government will count each resident of the United States as part of the constitutionally-mandated decennial census. In this course we will consider the importance and challenges of the census for measuring trends in sociological topics such as education, inequality, family composition, and race. Students will develop their skills in quantitative social science research by completing an independent project using census data. The class may also collaborate with local community organizations to use census data to identify how and where to provide services. Previous experience with the software package R is helpful, but not required. DED, SOC (M. Lawrence)

Studio Art

ART 0156 Drawing: Unlearning What You See
We will cover various approaches and experimentation with mark making and materials. Dry and wet media will be used as well as basic sculptural techniques to get a better understanding of the volumetric qualities of depicting space and figures. Students will learn how to render composition, scale, negative/positive space, contour lines, tonal values, line quality, and personal style. Class includes individual and group critiques, and when possible, field trips. Topics relating to representation such as who gets represented and how, will be discussed. Readings and short lectures will inform these discussions and there will be short writing assignments that will allow further exploration. No prior drawing experience is expected. (Not open to students who have taken ART 0157 or ART 0159) ART (E. Puerta Grisales)

ART 0159 Studio Art I: Drawing
In this course we will explore foundational elements of drawing including line, gesture, perspective, value, and composition. Students will draw objects, spaces, and the figure with an emphasis on direct observation. We will work in pencil, charcoal, ink, and collage. Assignments will focus on formal and technical aspects of drawing and the idea of drawing as an individual means of expression. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. A course fee of $50 will be charged.  ART (R. White, visiting winter term instructor)

Roger White is a painter and writer who teaches in the First Year Seminar Program and Studio Art Department at Middlebury. He is also a critic at the Rhode Island School of Design.

ART 0250 Introduction to Silkscreen Printing
In this course students will learn the fundamentals of screen printing. The focus will be on drawing and editing. Students will be exposed to the role of screen-printing in contemporary fine art as well as its use in popular culture. Students will make printed ephemera including an originally designed poster and zine. Students will receive tutorials, and take part in individual and group critiques. There is a lab fee for each student of approximately $110 for materials.  ART (M. Jordan)

ART 1130 Introduction to Oil Painting
In this course we will learn histories and techniques of oil painting and will develop skills and aesthetic sensibilities related to artistic expression in oil mediums. Students will be taught the properties as well common materials and processes used in creating oil paintings. Through assignments that reinforce the use of color and composition, we will explore a range of subject matter and themes for creating both representational and abstract paintings. In this course we will also focus on developing your critical eye as an artist, and becoming aware of trends and concerns in contemporary painting. We will explore these ideas through lectures, discussions, readings, critiques and a written assignments. ART (J. Kemp)

Theatre

THEA 1028 Site-Specific Theatre Performance
In this course we will explore methods of creating site-specific theatre performances then work to collaboratively create a performance using these methods. Drawing on the global profile of major practitioners in the field, we will analyze international and US-based productions of note and study key principles of place and space. This class will form an ensemble of site-specific theatre-makers, working together democratically to create several performance pieces in and around campus. Through in-class exercises and readings, we will generate material for a final site-specific performance to be performed publicly. ART (M. Biancosino)

Writing Program

WRPR/GSFS 0288 Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, and poems by modern and contemporary writers, including James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, Adrienne Rich, Amy Tan, Junot Diaz, and Eli Clare. Students will write short critical and creative pieces and will develop one longer essay, a critical narrative. We will engage in writing workshops and contemplative activities. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion. CW, LIT, SOC (C. Wright)

WRPR 1006 Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including letters, reported personal essays, op-eds, and reviews. We will work on developing critical thinking and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns, and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will be encouraged to publish their work for public consumption on campus or beyond. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints. CW (S. Greenberg, visiting winter term instructor)

Susan H. Greenberg is a writer, editor, and teacher who spent 22 years at Newsweek magazine.  Her work has also been published by the New York Times, The Washington Post, the Atlantic, Scientific American, and Middlebury magazine.  She lives in Middlebury, VT, with her husband, three childred, two dogs, a rabbit and a corn snake that terrifies her.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.