Winter Term 2017

 

Click HERE for CURRICULAR Information
Click HERE for REGISTRATION Information
Click HERE FOR "OPT-OUT" Information

WINTER TERM COURSES

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
   Classics
   History
   History of Art /Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY
    American Studies
    Environmental Studies
    Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist
      Studies
    Interdepartmental 
        Linguistics
    Neuroscience
    Writing Program
    Student-Led Course

LANGUAGES, CULTURES, & LITERATURES Departments
   Arabic          Italian     
   Chinese       Japanese
   French         Russian
   German       Latin
   Hebrew
   Spanish & Portuguese
 

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
  
Economics
  Education Studies
  Geography
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Sociology/Anthropology

LITERATURE Division
   English/American Lits
  

 

 

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Physics

 

OFF CAMPUS
Monterey Institute


American Studies

AMST 1016 Segregation in America: Baseball’s Negro Leagues
In this course we will examine the African-American contribution to the National Pastime. Organized baseball was segregated, black and white, from the end of the 19th century to the mid-20th century. Within segregated black communities, amid the debilitating effects of a separate and unequal world, a rich culture emerged and an absorbing chronicle was written. We will learn about life in baseball's "Negro leagues," and the great black players and teams, and consider how this sporting phenomenon reflects American values and history. (Not open to students who have taken AMST 0221). HIS, NOR (K. Lindholm)

Karl Lindholm, '67, is the Dean of Advising Emeritus at Middlebury College. He has served as either Faculty Head or Dean in all five residential commons.

Arabic

ARBC 0102 Beginning Arabic II
This course is an intensive continuation of ARBC 0101. In addition to the goals stated for that course there will be extra emphasis on cultural skills during winter term. (ARBC 0101 or equivalent). LNG (S. Liebhaber)

Biology

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well.  How do you randomize mice?  How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated?  If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer?  In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology.  We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results.  Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0325 Conservation Genetics
In this course we will explore the field of conservation genetics, which focuses on the application of genetic analyses to the conservation and management of biodiversity. This integrated lecture and laboratory course covers general topics in conservation genetics such as genetic variation and population structuring, as well as the practical implementation of commonly used conservation genetics methodologies. Students will conduct an original research project that they will transform into a journal-style article.  As such, students should prepare to read and discuss primary literature, and write scientifically. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145). SCI (C. Frare)

BIOL 0330 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
In this course we will explore how microbial pathogens colonize, invade, and persist in host organisms to cause disease.  Microbial pathogens include viruses, bacteria, and single-celled eukaryotic organisms that express virulence factors to potentiate disease in a resident host.  In our consideration of this dynamic interaction we will pay particular attention to the host response to infection and how microbes exploit that response to become parasitic.  Successful human pathogens to be studied will include bacteria (Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Salmonella, Mycobacteria, Borrelia, Listeria, and Helicobacter), fungi (Candida and Cryptococcus), protists (Plasmodium and Toxoplasma), and viruses (HIV, SARS, Ebola, Zika).  Investigating the mechanism(s) that control virulence gene expression can promote our understanding of the processes that render these and other microorganisms pathogenic, and so foster the development of effective treatment strategies aimed at controlling and/or preventing disease.  (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) SCI (B. Cluss, G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies.  Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period.  Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 1002 Experimental Approaches to the Ecology and Conservation of Bees
There is widespread concern that pesticides, pathogens, and climate change are causing decline of bee pollinators, threatening both agriculture and ecosystem health. How exactly do these threats affect bees? Are there synergistic negative effects among threats, and does social behavior mitigate risks, or increase bees’ exposure to them? Using captive colonies of bumblebees, in this course we will design and conduct experiments to explore how bee biology and social behavior affect bee responses to environmental threats. Through lecture, readings, and discussion we will explore pollination and bee declines, and students will complete a paper describing their experimental work. This course counts as a Biology elective. SCI (L. Richardson, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Leif Richardson is a USDA-funded postdoctoral research fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont. His research focuses on pollination, mycorrhizal fungi, agriculture, and conservation of wild bees.

Chinese

CHNS 0102 Continuation of Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring.  Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions.  Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101) LNG (T. Moran, K. Wang, Y. Lin, visiting winter term instructor)

Computer Science

CSCI 1005 Crash Course in Systems Security
In this course students will learn the theory and practice of computer systems security.  Morning lectures will be complemented by afternoon lab-sessions in which, under the close guidance of the instructor, students will complete both individual and group projects that will deepen their understanding of how (in)secure systems are implemented.  Students will learn to use industry-standard tools for performing analysis of system vulnerabilities; be introduced to the systems security research landscape; and gain an understanding of ethical, political, and financial issues surrounding systems security research. (Approval required; CSCI 0202) DED (P. Johnson)

Dance

ARDV 0216 Collaboration in the Arts: The Creative Process Continues
Taking the experience and knowledge produced in ARDV 0116, The Creative Process, as our starting place, we will collaborate to build more extended, complex, multi-media projects- including performances, installations, and hybrid works. We will research artistic collaboration, that slippery creative relationship with models in every variety of art production, to inspire our hands-on investigations and put them into historical and cultural context. Readings will come from recent literature on collaboration in the arts. Journals, short research papers/presentations, and daily in-class experimentation will culminate in substantial final projects that are original, collaborative, and unpredictable. (ARDV 0116, ARDV 0117, or equivalent, or by approval) ART (M. ReMalia)

DANC 0381 Dance Company of Middlebury
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing repertory dances. Those receiving credit can expect daily rehearsals plus technique classes, campus performance, and tour. Appropriate written work is required. Auditions are held in the fall semester for the full year; one credit will be given for two semesters of participation. (Approval Required; limited to sophomores through seniors by audition) (S. Hardwig)

DANC 1009 Community Dialogue Through the Arts
In this course students will learn both the theory and the practice of community dialogue through the arts. We will study the roles of community organizers, activists, artists, community members, performers, and scholars in the field of community engagement, such as The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Urban Bush Women, Crossroads Theatre, and Jan Cohen-Cruz of Imagining America. Students will collaborate to design, plan, implement, and document a community engagement project aimed at making tangible change that continues after the course is completed. Readings will be drawn from Radical Street Performance, Visions of Culture, and Imagining America Publications. ART, SOC (P. McGregor)

DANC 1026 Interdisciplinary Storytelling: Silent and Spoken, Movement and Stillness
Calling dancers, poets, spoken word artists, singers, musicians, and storytellers! Come together to share, create, and collaborate in an interdisciplinary exploration of abstract and narrative storytelling. Through improvisation and structure, we will create stories through body and voice. We will look at, create, tell, and share our personal stories as well as others'. In a supportive environment we will share our stories through movement and narrative, allowing and encouraging participants to build bridges between each other and contribute to the growth of community. Readings, films, journal writing, and performance will be an integral part of this course. ART (L. Winfield, a visiting winter instructor)

Lida Winfield is an accomplished dancer, choreographer, and spoken word artist who has performed nationally and internationally.  Since 2006, she has created original solo, duet, and group work; merging storytelling, dance, and visual art to create captivating and poignant performances. www.lidawinfield.com

Economics

ECON 1017 The Application of Statistics to Sports
The central problem of quantitative analysis in any social science is trying to explain the complex and multivariate character of individual human and institutional behavior.  The problem of quantitative research, in turn, is that of finding a statistical method that yields a useful approximation of reality.  The objective of this course is to give students with an interest in athletic games an opportunity to apply the tools of statistical analysis to the study of several sports topics of their own choosing. (MATH  0116 or ECON 0210 strongly recommended) DED (P. Sommers)

ECON 1023 Extending Financial Services to the Unbanked
In this course we will explore different interventions and tools used for poverty alleviation, financial inclusion, and the extension of financial services to the unbanked poor in emerging markets. We will look at the use of microfinance, microinsurance, financial literacy, and the rising use of technology including cell phone payment services to achieve these goals in developing countries.  In addition to articles, we will draw on special guest speakers to represent case studies and themes from the course outline. This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Economics and towards the major in IPEC. SOC (E. Toder, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Elizabeth Toder, '90, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand 20 years ago, and since then has lived in Brasil, Argentina, Jordan, Haiti, and Vietnam developing microfinance and microinsurance programs. She has consulted on issues of financial inclusion and shelter for Build Change and financing for water and sanitation projects for Water.Org.

 ECON 1024 Economic Dominance of Central Asia
The phrase The Great Game originated from Rudyard Kipling’s novel Kim and described the 19th Century geopolitical and economic struggle between Russia and Great Britain. Now, a “New” Great Game is brewing in the region. Although it has different players, the "game" may be the same; economic dominance of Central Asia. This highly interactive course will examine the players, the economic factors, the economic and geopolitical strategies of the game, and the future of the “New” Great Game. CMP (K. Millier, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Kimberly Millier focuses on Central Asia and specializes in economic development, entrepreneurship, gender issues, leadership, and organizational development of the region. Dr. Millier is a dissertation chair and instructor within the School of Doctoral Studies at Grand Canyon University and has conducted seminars, trainings, and educational programs in Central Asia and the countries of the Former Soviet Union since 1991


Education Studies

EDST 0227 JusTalks at Middlebury
In this course students will develop the ability to facilitate the JusTalks First-Year Forums that will take place during winter term and spring semester. The First Year Forums are intended to (i) foster the habits of listening empathically and responding constructively when engaging in complex discussions that address topics such as privilege and difference, and (ii) develop greater awareness of how to contribute actively to building an inclusive community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students will develop in this course are consciously intended to be transferable to other settings and transformative for the Middlebury community. (Approval Required) SOC (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 0327 Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail) (T. Weston)

EDST 0337 The Urban Education Internship
This internship provides teaching and learning opportunities in schools in Washington, D.C. During the term, each student will be assigned to work as an intern with a classroom teacher or program at a school in our nation's capital. Tasks will vary but may include: observing classes, tutoring, directing small-group work, working with special education students, working in the computer lab, and working with outreach programs. Students will spend four full days (M-Th) at the school each week, keep a journal, and complete a formal essay about their experience. On Fridays, students will engage in an extensive reflective seminar and work with staff in our Middlebury College, Washington, D.C. office. Lodging and a lunch stipend are provided. (EDST 0115 or SOAN 0215; Approval required, please contact Jonathan Miller-Lane or Trish Dougherty prior to registration). (Pass/Fail) (T. Affolter)

EDST 1007 Executive Function and Literacy
In this course students will gain an understanding of executive function and ADHD, how they affect literacy, and what teachers can do to create more successful learning environments. Students will explore areas of the brain responsible for executive functioning and varied manifestations of its dysfunction. You will learn to distinguish between behaviors that appear to be defiance or laziness and conditions causing these behaviors. Through readings, multi-media, and interactive activities, students will develop a new lens through which to consider student learning, and strategies to assist these students in their ability to access content and demonstrate understanding. (D. Tracht, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Debbie Tracht, MA, CAGS, is a Literacy Specialist and ADHD Consultant. She has recently completed a Certificate of Graduate Studies on the Mind, Brain, and Teaching from Johns Hopkins School of Education. You can learn more about her and her work at www.middleburycenter.com.

English and American Literatures

ENAM 1001 Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Coetzee’s Elizabeth Costello, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective. LIT (C. Baldridge)

ENAM 1029 Tackling Old English Poetry (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will examine the literature, history, and culture of the Germanic tribes known as the Anglo-Saxons, who invaded Britain as the Roman Empire crumbled into the so-called Dark Age. We will study the basics of their language, Old English, by closely reading such poems as "The Wanderer," "The Seafarer," "The Dream of the Rood," and the first part of Beowulf in modern translations as well as in the original. In addition, we will read and discuss selections from historical documents, such as the Venerable Bede's "Ecclesiastical History of the English People," that shed light on the culture and society of the Anglo-Saxons. Students will be expected to have read two works by the great Anglo-Saxonist J.R.R. Tolkien before the course starts: his classic article "Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics" and The Hobbit. EUR, LIT (D. Brayton)

ENAM 1030 Bibliotherapy: Reading and Writing the Psyche
An inscription over the door of a library in Ancient Egypt purportedly read, “Medicine for the Soul,” and the modern practice known as “Bibliotherapy” similarly claims that reading and writing can have powerful psychological benefits. How can reading books improve your mental health? Can writing about trauma help to heal psychic wounds? In this course we will explore contemporary theories of the therapeutic value of literature; readings will include novels, poems, short stories, memoirs, and psychological articles. Students will write analytical essays as well as creative works, which will be shared with classmates in a writing workshop setting. CW, LIT (A. Losano)

 ENAM/ENVS 1031 Environmental Justice at the Margins: Non/fictions
Does it make sense to talk about environmental justice at the margins of global society, where the political, social, and legal structures that ensure justice tend to fail? With three literary case studies—the toxic slums of a fictionalized Bhopal; the ghost-voices of Chernobyl’s radioactive wasteland; and the land-mined countryside of a post-war Mozambique—we will consider the strategies writers use to fictionalize real contaminated environments. Our three primary texts are Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People, 2015 Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich’s Voices from Chernobyl, and Mia Couto’s The Last Flight of the Flamingo, which we will read alongside critical writings and short films. This course counts as an ENVS humanities cognate. LIT (A. Mahlstedt, a visiting winter term instructor)

 Andrew Mahlstedt, '98, has taught at the Mahindra United World College of India, the United World College in Mostar (Bosnia and Herzegovina), and twice taught winter term classes at Middlebury College (2008, 2011).

CRWR/THEA 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

CRWR 0360 Fiction in Practice and Theory
This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction.  It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts though with the ultimate aim of subverting self-censoring habits that inhibit creative freedom.  Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all.  ART (K. Kramer)

CRWR 0375 Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Walk of a Poem
As Lyn Hejinian writes, “Language makes tracks.” Poets from Chaucer to Whitman to O’Hara have used walking as a poetic method, thematic subject, narrative device, and pedestrian act. The walk is literal and imaginary, metrical and meandering; it traverses urban grids and bucolic landscapes, junctions of space, time, and lexis. In this workshop we will read the topographies of poems, focusing on lyrical cities from Paris to Harlem, Thoreauvian ambles through woods and field, and other literary wanderings and linguistic itinerancies, in order to examine how language gets made and mirrored in the act of moving through place. Students will also set out on walks through the local landscape as they produce their own work. Students will address crucial questions and challenges focused on the craft of poetry through rigorous readings, in-class writing exercises, critical discussions, collaborations, and the development of a portfolio of writing, including drafts and revisions. By the end of the course, students will have engaged deeply with the practice of poetry, established a writing discipline, honed their skills, generated new work, explored by foot, and extended their sense of the possibilities of a poem. ART (S. Cassarino, a visiting winter term instructor)

CRWR 0380 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 1005 Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age.  Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video recorder--the tools of today's investigative journalists—students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread.  In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Adobe Premiere files for video editing. Video cameras and tripods supplied by the college. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105. LIT (P. Lourie, a visiting winter term instructor)

Peter Lourie is the author of many award-winning nonfiction books for adults and children.  He is well known for his photographic adventure stories around the globe, and is currently working on a book about Norwegian polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen.  He is also producing multimedia stories for the National Science Foundation about a month-long icebreaker trip he made last fall in the Canadian Arctic.

Environmental Studies

ENVS/GEOG 1024 Conservation and Land Management in Practice
In this place-based course we will investigate land conservation and resource management at numerous spatial scales centered on the northern forest of Vermont and New York. Studying the application of conservation tools and practices from site to landscape scales, we will explore issues including forest and wildlife management, recreational use, educational programming, public-private partnerships, and history of land conservation and use in these contested spaces. We will focus on three public-private conservation stories to glean local, regional, and national contexts and hear numerous perspectives on successes and challenges. Group projects will compare and contrast land conservation initiatives in other regions. This course counts as a non-lab cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (Approval required) (B. Hegman, M. Lapin)

ENVS 1025 Kingdom Community Wind - Perspectives On Renewable Energy Development
In this course we will study Vermont renewable energy development goals, solar and wind turbine siting controversies, net metering rules, and Renewable Energy Credit policies.  We will compare the Lowell, Vermont Kingdom Community Wind Project to the Cape Wind Project in Massachusetts, considering the diverse perspectives of developers, opponents, and regulators. Using public materials, we will analyze the issues and arguments surrounding large renewable (solar/wind) energy development. We will ask: How should renewable energy projects be sited? How have public discussions and projects in Massachusetts and California played out differently from those in Vermont? Are Vermont’s public policy tradeoffs different from those faced elsewhere? (B. Marks, a visiting winter term instructor)

Benjamin Marks is an attorney who has represented public utilities and Vermont towns before Vermont Public Service Board for the past ten years.  He currently serves as the chair of the Select Board of the Town of Cornwall and on the Board of Directors of the Acorn Energy Cooperative.

ENVS 1026 Impact Investing for a Sustainable Planet
In this course we will explore the field of impact investing, with specific emphasis on its evolution, company case studies, and current players in the field. We will look at “first movers”, “lost leaders”, and growth companies which sustainably manage natural resources, mitigate climate change, and protect ecosystems. We will focus on practical evaluative tools to undertake effective sourcing, due diligence, monitoring, and exits in building a solid portfolio of impact investments. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (T. Newmark, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tammy E. Newmark, a pioneer in impact investing for 20 years, is CEO and Managing Partner of EcoEnterprises Fund--a growth capital fund for sustainable ventures in emerging markets.

ENVS/ENAM 1031 Environmental Justice at the Margins: Non/fictions
Does it make sense to talk about environmental justice at the margins of global society, where the political, social, and legal structures that ensure justice tend to fail? With three literary case studies—the toxic slums of a fictionalized Bhopal; the ghost-voices of Chernobyl’s radioactive wasteland; and the land-mined countryside of a post-war Mozambique—we will consider the strategies writers use to fictionalize real contaminated environments. Our three primary texts are Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People, 2015 Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich’s Voices from Chernobyl, and Mia Couto’s The Last Flight of the Flamingo, which we will read alongside critical writings and short films. This course counts as an ENVS humanities cognate. LIT (A. Mahlstedt, a visiting winter term instructor)

Andrew Mahlstedt, '98, has taught at the Mahindra United World College of India, the United World College in Mostar (Bosnia and Herzegovina), and twice taught winter term classes at Middlebury College (2008, 2011).

ENVS 1032 Forest Conservation in North America
The wild and wooded lands of North America have been critical for the development of society, and their significance is only expected to grow. In this course we will explore the wide variety of political and economic approaches used to “protect” forested lands, and examine how those approaches shape the landscape around us today. Students will be introduced to the roles of different publicly-owned forests, programs for privately-owned forests, and the challenges those strategies might face in the future. The course will incorporate examples from local forestlands conserved by land trusts, towns, state, and federal agencies. This course counts as an ENVS social science cognate. NOR (A. L'Roe, a visiting winter term instructor)

Andrew L’Roe is a conservationist and forest policy specialist with experience working with public and private forest owners and conservation organizations in several states and continents.

ENVS 1036 Sea Turtles to Sharks
In the past two decades there has been an exponential increase in the number and size of marine protected areas (MPAs) worldwide. MPAs are used to aid fisheries, protect biodiversity, and stabilize coastal ecosystems. In this course we will engage an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from the fields of conservation biology, political ecology, and anthropology, to investigate MPA design and effectiveness in multiple locales globally. Specific issues we will investigate include: marine organism life-cycle traits, connectivity, land-sea linkages, predator-prey dynamics, centralized versus decentralized MPA governance, gendered marine property, indigenous rights, and “sea grabbing.” We will draw comparisons among MPA projects and examine dynamics between individuals within a given MPA project. The course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions. SOC (M. Baker-Médard)

ENVS 1110 Ice Cores: By Land and by Sea
Ice coring is a primary technique for polar scientists studying Earth’s climate, both past and present, as well as for understanding air-ocean-land interactions.  Although there are similarities in extracting glacial and sea ice cores, the scientific questions these cores help answer are quite different.  What can we learn about past climate from two-mile thick ice?  How do brine channels provide pathways for salts moving between the ocean and the atmosphere?  In this hands-on course, we will learn the different analysis techniques used to study ice cores, and pursue group research questions using ice cores from both Antarctica and the Arctic. SCI (R. Lieb-Lappen, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Ross Lieb-Lappen, ’07, combined his environmental studies and chemistry degree from Middlebury College with a M.S. in mathematics from the University of Vermont to complete a Ph.D. in Engineering at Dartmouth College, studying the microstructure of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice.  He currently is a post-doctorate fellow at the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), where he continues investigating the microstructure of snow and ice.

Film and Media Culture

FMMC 1018 Cinematography
Cinematography is an advanced video production course with a focus on narrative film lighting, composition, and camera movement.  In this course we will produce 4-5 short video assignments, will complete a research presentation on a cinematographer, will learn lighting and camera movement techniques in a hands-on collaborative environment, and will attend lectures and screenings to develop a better understanding of the art and craft of Cinematography.  Each day we will spend the first hour performing increasingly technical lighting and camera setups, the second hour learning about new concepts in a traditional lecture setting, and the third hour screening films. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) ART (E. Murphy, a visiting winter term instructor)

Ethan Murphy is the Media Production Specialist in the Film and Media Culture Department.  Ethan has worked on television shows, independent films, live broadcasts, commercials, and music videos for PBS Frontline, MTV, and HGTV.  He recently completed The Camera and Visual Storytelling workshop with Steven Fierberg, ASC; The Camera Operator Workshop with Amy Vincent, ASC; and Tom Richmond, ASC at Maine Media Workshop + College.  His cinematography work has screened at the Vermont International Film Festival and the Green Mountain Film Festival.

FMMC 1020 Collaborative Video Projects
In this course groups of students will organize, devise, and produce original video projects concluding with a public screening. Students must request approval from the instructor prior to winter term registration via the application on the FMMC website. Students must do significant preproduction before January. Projects will be self-guided with oversight from the faculty, and subject to peer review. (Pass/Fail; Approval required) (J. Mittell)

FMMC 1025 YouTube: History, Culture, & Practice
What does YouTube offer as cultural forum and cultural force, and what are its limits? How has YouTube changed since its 2005 origin, and how is it continuing to evolve? YouTube functions as a site of negotiation between professional and amateur, and between corporate and grassroots. It is home to evolving aesthetics and niche communities, and also functions as a commercial platform. In this course we will explore the commercial and cultural contexts of YouTube and the media forms evolving within its interface. Work for this course involves academic written analyses and media production, including vlogs, reaction videos, remix, and web series. ART, SOC (L. Stein)

FMMC 1134 Sound and Story: Introduction to Podcasting
In this course we will immerse ourselves in the rich world of podcasting.  Students will listen extensively to a wide sampling of work from shows Serial, Modern Love, Another Round, Love + Radio, The Truth, Embedded, RadioLab, and many more.  Students will also produce their own original sound-rich audio piece that will premiere at a public listening event at the close of the winter session. Each student will be required to purchase a set of studio quality, noise-canceling headphones (no ear buds) costing approximately $90. It is strongly advised that students have an external hard drive on which to duplicate and backup their media.   ART (E. Davis, a visiting winter term instructor)

Erin Davis’ audio documentary work has aired on NPR's All Things Considered and WNYC's Studio 360. She currently creates documentary for radio and film.

FMMC 1136 Action and Moving Image
How is action constituted on the screen? And how does the medium affect and inform our experience and understanding of action? We will discuss the formation and transformation of various moving image practices, styles, genres, and cultures in terms of new technologies and techniques as well as new modes of distribution and reception. The moving image practices that we will discuss in this course include, but are not limited to, those surrounding the production and reception of popular and classical action genres such as Hollywood Western, gangster film, Chinese martial arts cinema, Japanese chambara or samurai film, and contemporary Hollywood blockbusters. ART (J. Yamazaki, a visiting winter term instructor)

Junko Yamazaki received her Ph.D. in the joint degree program in Cinema and Media Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 2016. Her research focuses on Japanese film and spectatorship, and in particular, on the intersection of popular culture and the avant-garde in postwar Japan, and a type of period-film known as jidaigeki

French

FREN 0102 Beginning French
This course is a continuation of FREN 0101, dealing with more complex French. Oral skills are stressed, and students participate in the French language table at lunch. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (FREN 0101) (A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron, W. Poulin-Deltour)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

GSFS 1006 Visions of Laila: Encountering the Feminine in the Female Body
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary and experiential approach to understanding the female body, focusing specifically on the female organ systems through the lens of women’s health, physical and energy medicine, psychology, spirituality and art. Using Tami Kent’s Wild Feminine as a primary text as well as other readings, presentations, meditative exercises and art-making, we will explore questions of how gender is embodied; the beliefs and constructs we hold about femininity; how we might counter voices of shame, violence and guilt through reclaiming ground in the body; and the links between creative potential and sexuality.  This course counts as elective credit towards the GSFS major. (N. Baloch, a visiting winter term instructor)

Naila Baloch has a Master in Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School, and is an Associate Chaplain and Muslim Advisor at Middlebury College. She is trained in holistic pelvic care for women and has run women’s groups for eight years.


Geography

GEOG 1022 Cartography of Environmental Disasters
In this course we will spatially interpret stories of environmental disasters. Where did people go and how did they organize themselves on the landscape according to race, class, and gender during an ongoing event like the Dust Bowl or Hurricane Katrina? Combining historical maps with accounts such as Donald Worster’s Dust Bowl and films such as Spike Lee’s When the Levees Broke, we will analyze, discuss, and write essays tracing stories of migrations and homelands in the face of unwanted environmental change. Students will undertake detailed case studies that combine cartographic and text-based forms of historical and geographical storytelling. SOC (D. Grant)

Daniel Grant is a PhD candidate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Geography. He studies the historical geography of planning for and adapting to environmental disasters.

GEOG/ENVS 1024 Conservation and Land Management in PracticeIn this place-based course we will investigate land conservation and resource management at numerous spatial scales centered on the northern forest of Vermont and New York. Studying the application of conservation tools and practices from site to landscape scales, we will explore issues including forest and wildlife management, recreational use, educational programming, public-private partnerships, and history of land conservation and use in these contested spaces. We will focus on three public-private conservation stories to glean local, regional, and national contexts and hear numerous perspectives on successes and challenges. Group projects will compare and contrast land conservation initiatives in other regions. This course counts as a non-lab cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. (Approval required) (B. Hegman, M. Lapin)

GEOG/INTD 1183 Landscape: Photography and Geography
In this course we will examine concepts closely associated with geography—place, space, time, and the human landscape—and how these transformed landscape photography into a powerful mechanism for understanding and conveying critical changes in the environment and climate. Students will read, discuss, and apply geographical theory; review and appraise historical and contemporary landscape photographs; participate in field trips/photo shoots, produce their own landscape photos; write analytical papers; and view and critique environmental films. The course will include weekly labs covering digital photo processing and printing and culminate in a public exhibition of student work.  Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. Not open to students who have taken HARC/GEOG 1021. ART (T. Case, a visiting winter term instructor)

Timothy Case, PhD, has applied his interests in place and space to his photographs of the built, manufactured, and natural landscapes.

*Student fee to cover additional supply expense

Geology

GEOL 1023 Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices. SCI (T. Manley)

 

German

GRMN 0102 Beginning German Continued
This course is the intensive continuation of GRMN 0101 which will further the development of students’ language skills in an immersion-like environment.   Classes meet for two hours each morning, then lunch at the language tables, in addition to afternoon and evening activities. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to enrollment in GRMN 0103. (GRMN 0101 or equivalent) LNG (F. Feiereisen, B. Matthias)

Hebrew-Modern

HEBM 0102 Introductory Modern Hebrew II
This course is an intensive continuation of Modern Hebrew 0101. Students will expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, will increase their proficiency in oral communication, and will study selections of both audio and visual media related to modern-day Israel. (HEBM 0101 or equivalent) LNG (O. Zakai)

History

HIST 0352 Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
In this course we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Using an array of primary and secondary sources, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will study the consumption of and attitudes toward specific foodstuffs, gauging the relevance of items like spices and coffee in the pre-modern period and of various dishes within modern nationalist constructions. We will also investigate how Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have historically used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOC (F. Armanios)

HIST 1021 Building the Digital World of “Twelve Years A Slave”
In 1840 Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, was kidnapped and sold into slavery in Louisiana.  After regaining his freedom, he wrote his memoir, Twelve Years a Slave.  In this course we will use Solomon Northup as a way to understand the diverse worlds that existed within antebellum America.  We will study his memoir alongside other materials and conduct historical research on the communities he inhabited as a free man and as a slave.  Our work will then focus on the construction of a digital archive that captures the people, places, and issues of his time. HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

 

History of Art and Architecture

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design
Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research as well as field trips to see innovation in the works, including house tours (both in construction and finished). Students will work in teams and individually to analyze existing buildings and design their own.  Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (A. Murray)

HARC 0711 Senior Thesis: Research and Writing
This course is a continuation of HARC 0710 which consists of ongoing, supervised independent research, plus organizing, writing and presenting a senior thesis. (HARC 0301 and HARC 0710) (E. Vazquez)

 HARC 0732 Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design
This studio course constitutes the second part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies.  Building upon the architectural research, analysis, and preliminary design work conducted during the fall semester, students develop their thesis projects to a higher level of understanding and refinement. Students also engage in intense peer review and work with visiting design critics, concluding with public presentations of the final projects, and a project portfolio describing all aspects of the completed design. (HARC 0731) (J. McLeod)

HARC 1022 Prints, Drawings, and Photographs from the Middlebury College Museum of Art
In this course we will study the prints, drawings, and photographs given to the Middlebury College Museum of Art by Charles S. Moffett, ‘67. Charles Moffett was formerly curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art, director of the Phillips Collection, and officer at Sotheby’s.   Students will conduct research on the collection, which includes objects from the 17th to the 21st centuries, and select a number of works to be included in a fall 2017 exhibition.  In addition to studying and contextualizing these works, students will visit collections in other museums. ART, HIS (C. Anderson)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 1014 American Sign Language I
In this course students will be introduced to American Sign Language (ASL). This course is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Students will have an opportunity to learn social functions with respect to introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, describing simple narratives, and they will develop beginning conversational skills based on ASL vocabulary and grammatical rules. The fundamentals of the Deaf Culture will be examined through classroom demonstration and readings. LNG (A. Lynch, a visiting winter term instructor)

Alex Lynch has been teaching American Sign Language (ASL) and History of the Deaf Community at the University of Vermont since January 2011. Previously, he taught ASL at the University of Arizona.

INTD 1074 MiddCORE 2017
MiddCORE’s mentor-driven leadership and innovation immersion program builds skills and confidence through collaborative, experiential, and impact-focused learning. Through daily, weekly, and month-long challenges, students gain experience in leadership, strategic thinking, idea creation, collaboration, persuasive communication, ethical decision-making, cross-cultural understanding, conflict resolution, empathy, and crisis management. Acceptance into MiddCORE 2017 is by approval only. To learn more about this January's MiddCORE curriculum and to apply to the program, please visit go/MiddCOREwinter.  Applications are due by 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27th.  Decisions will be emailed by Sunday evening, Oct. 30th. (Pass/Fail; Approval Required) (J. Holmes, S. Stroup)

INTD 1089 Middlebury Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurship is the mindset and skill set that allows passionate people to execute business plans and create lasting, influential companies. Students will go from idea to company launch quickly and effectively through deliverables, class discussions, and hands-on mentoring both from professors and visiting entrepreneurs and investors.  Class will be focused on building a prototype, testing the market, and engaging with customers, so students should be prepared for significant hands-on work outside of class time.  At the conclusion of the course, students will compete with their classmates in a pitch competition. To enroll in the course, students must submit a business proposal (either for profit or not for profit idea) and meet in person with one of the instructors, prior to registration. In one paragraph, please explain: 1) the problem or opportunity you will address; 2) the proposed product or solution to solve this problem; and 3) why you are well-suited to tackle this project. Please submit proposals to MiddEnt@middlebury.edu (by Friday October 28th at the latest). If you do not have an idea but are interested in being a team member, please indicate your interests and relevant skill sets in an email to the same address.  (Approval Required; Pass/Fail) (D. Bradbury, B. Reese visiting winter term instructors)

David Bradbury and Bonnie Resee work at the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), an independent nonprofit technology business incubation program offering business mentoring, venture capital, office facilities, and substantive networking to the region’s entrepreneurs and emerging next generation employers. www.VermontTechnologies.com.

INTD 1102 Hospice and End-of-Life Care
In this course we will explore psychological, sociological, and cultural experiences involving death, learn about the modern hospice movement, palliative care, community services for patients, spirituality and dying, as well as after-death rituals and grief issues.  Guest presenters will include members of the local hospice team (nurses, social worker, chaplain, volunteer coordinator, local palliative care physicians), and specialists in bereavement and dementia.  We will examine variables that impact the end of life and ways to create a meaningful dying experience.  Each student will select a specific interest to explore in depth.  This course will include all the elements required to become a certified hospice volunteer for those wishing to work with hospice patients in the community. (Pass/Fail) SOC (P. Baker, a visiting winter term instructor)

Priscilla Baker is Program Director of Hospice Volunteer Services, a community organization that provides volunteer support to hospice patients, families, and caregivers; bereavement support to anyone who has experienced loss; and community education to promote a healthy understanding of death, dying, and loss.

INTD 1109 Infectious Disease: Historical Epidemics, Current Dilemmas, and Emerging Problems
Have you ever wondered what happened during the Black Death? What’s really going on with HIV these days? Why do I get the cold and the flu every year? Why shouldn’t I drink the water in Otter Creek? Where did Ebola and Zika virus come from, and why now?  In this course we will cover a broad array of topics past, present, and emerging in medical infectious disease. We will explore classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis, microbiology, immunology, and the social context of infectious diseases, from the perspective of the physician. This course counts as an elective towards the Global Health minor. SCI (A. Hale, R. Johanson, visiting winter term instructors)

Andy Hale, '06, is currently a Clinical Fellow in Infectious Disease at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School

Russ Johanson, '06, is a practicing emergency physician at MatSu Regional Hospital in Palmer, AK.

INTD 1118 Modern Media and Healthcare: Beyond Viagra and Grey's Anatomy
News, entertainment, commercials, TV, movies, on line and social modern media is the primary source of health information for consumers. Much is credible but there is also no shortage of contradictory and incorrect health content.  In this course we will examine various media forms and their influence on health perceptions, expectations, priorities, and beliefs. Using current examples, we will flesh out how particular health issues break into public consciousness, change behaviors, and evolve and drive healthcare policy, as well as cite case histories where media spin led to unwarranted consumer hysteria.  The course will prompt analytic skills to comprehend "raw" medical studies to compare with popular media interpretations while at the other extreme will look at media content such as House and Scrubs. The term culminates in hands on multi-media project to prompt a consumer response to an emerging health issue or behavior. NOR, SOC (H. Torman, a visiting winter term instructor)

Howard Torman, MD, is a former national medical correspondent and health editor for CBS News. He is currently a medical media consultant.

INTD 1125 Introduction to Meditation
Basic sitting and walking meditation will be taught and intensively practiced. We will use the breath to foster relaxed attention and to gain perspective on our restless minds. Emphasis will be on using these techniques in daily life and academic endeavors. We will read texts from the contemporary American, Tibetan and Zen Buddhist traditions, but the meditation will be employed in nonsectarian fashion applicable to any belief system. Truth should be verified by one’s experience. Students will write papers and give presentations. No meditation experience necessary. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1393) AAL (J. Huddleston)

INTD 1127 Trees and the Urban Forest
Trees play a very important, if often forgotten, role in our towns and cities, and across the globe.  Wildlife habitat, pollution and storm water abatement, carbon sequestration, and energy savings all arise from a healthy and active urban forest. In this class we will study the uses and values of the urban forest, basic tree biology and identification, arboricultural practices, planning and design, and resource management and community involvement. By using computer models to calculate factors in an urban forest setting, including carbon sequestration and pollution abatement, the class will help develop a complete tree planting proposal for an area in the Town of Middlebury. (Not open to students who have taken BIOL 1003). This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the social sciences or humanities. SCI (T. Parsons, a visiting winter term instructor)

Tim Parsons is Middlebury College’s Landscape Horticulturist. He is a Certified Arborist by the International Society of Arboriculture, a Vermont Certified Horticulturist, and holds a B.S. in Plant and Soil Science from the University of Vermont.

INTD 1131 Visual Data Analysis
“The greatest value of a picture is when it forces us to notice what we never expected to see” (John W. Tukey, American statistician). In this course we will focus on scientific data visualization, a powerful complement to statistical analysis.  Using datasets from various fields, as well as students' choice, we will learn principles for processing and visualizing data.  Throughout, we will use R, the premier programming language for data visualization and analysis.  No previous knowledge of programming is assumed, but by course's end students will write powerful scripts to analyze and present data in a clear and compelling way. This course counts as a Biology elective. (Pass/Fail) (M. Landis)

INTD 1135 British Popular Culture
George Orwell once described the English in terms of their fondness for “the pub, the football match, the back garden, the fireside, and the ‘nice cup of tea'." But what would he have made of the Sex Pistols or Amy Winehouse? In this course we will trace a particular arc through post-1945 British popular culture in order to ask how we got from Orwell to The Office, from the Rolling Stones to Radiohead. We will ask how film, music, and TV prepared the ground for important episodes in British history: the “special relationship” with the United States, the modernization of sexuality, the transformation from welfare state to free market capitalism, the slow passage toward a multicultural society. ART, EUR, SOC (B. Graves)

INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Culture
This course introduces students to Swahili, the lingua franca of East Africa.  Students will acquire a foundation for speaking, reading, and writing Swahili, and will learn how to use it appropriately in East African culture.  The use of English in the classroom will be kept to a minimum.  The course also provides an introduction to the geography and history of East Africa.  This course is particularly useful for students who intend to visit Kenya, Tanzania, or Uganda, because its linguistic and cross-cultural training will give them the resources to maximize such an experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the African Studies minor.  AAL, LNG (W. Roki, a visiting winter term instructor)

Dr. Waithera’s focus is African languages and second language acquisition with special reference to the Kiswahili language. She is interested in how East and West African languages intersect. She is passionate in teaching the syntax of the Kiswahili language.

INTD 1173 International Maternal and Child Health
In this course we will study Maternal and Child Health (MCH) using a multidisciplinary approach, which will provide perspective on determinants of health and the ways that various levels of society and culture influence the health of women and children around the world. Issues will include: human rights, water, nutrition, sexual/ reproductive health, childbirth, and infectious disease, as each relates to maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Students will utilize MCH indicators to describe MCH as a part of holistic global health, applying course concepts to illuminate the importance of MCH to socio-economic progress, sustainability, and ultimately, global development. This course will count as an elective towards the Global Health Minor. SOC (M. McLaughlin, a visiting winter term instructor) 

Megan McLaughlin is a global health professional focusing on international maternal and child health with a strong focus on water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH); reproductive and sexual health, and preventable illness in children.She has worked in the non-profit and benefit corporation sectors supporting and completing projects in Africa (Uganda, Ghana, Burkina Faso), South America (Ecuador), Central America, and the Caribbean (Honduras and Haiti).

INTD 1174 African Cinema: Negotiating Post-Colonial Identities         
In this course we will study how African films from 1967 and beyond, address the rapidly changing and conflicting cultural identities of post-colonial Africans. Through a combination of film and African studies readings, paired with screenings of films from sub-Saharan Africa, students will come to understand the impact of colonialism on African culture and will respond critically to how these changes are reflected in cinematic representations of post-colonial African lives. Assignments will include weekly screening responses, a group research project, and a final presentation. AAL (N. Ngaiza, a visiting winter term instructor)

Natasha Ngaiza is a filmmaker and scholar whose work investigates issues of black identity, displacement and exile, motherhood, and the intricacies of cultural heritage. Her works have been screened and recognized in over a dozen film festivals.

INTD 1177 Social Movements, Theory, and Practice
There are many ways to affect politics, from voting to lobbying to corrupting leaders. But building social movements—from the civil rights movement to the Tea Parties—is one of the most powerful and positive approaches. In this course students will examine the history and structure of movements from the left, right, and middle; try to figure out how conditions have changed in an internet age; and develop particular strategies for campaigns that interest them. Not open to students who have taken ENVS 0340. SOC (B. McKibben)

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of, among other works, The Comforting Whirlwind: God, Job, and the Scale of Creation.

INTD 1179 Food Loss in Vermont
In this course we will study agricultural food loss in Vermont. We will look at how federal and state policies affect the production and distribution of Vermont-grown food.  Students will learn directly from non-profit leaders, government officials, food system researchers, and farmers.  In this course students will also learn how to conduct standardized survey interviews, a data collection method often used in the social sciences. Students will have the opportunity to apply their new knowledge from this course to a real-world project for Salvation Farms, a Vermont-based nonprofit that works to build a sustainable food system and reduce agricultural food loss. This course counts as an ENVS social science cognate. SOC (E. Dean, a visiting winter term instructor)

Elana Dean is a principal at Isgood Community Research, LLC, which provides monitoring & evaluation services to organizations with social missions, including those focused on food systems and hunger relief. She is an adjunct faculty in the Development Practice & Policy Program at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. She holds a Master’s of Public Policy from the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy Studies.

INTD 1180 The Science of Stress
Stress is increasingly recognized as a primary determinant of well-being.  To what degree is the stress response more under our control than we think? In this course we will explore the latest science relating brain, body, behavior, and stress, covering topics including the neuroendocrine and brain response, cognitive-behavioral changes, and health & disease states. Additionally, we will learn about popular stress-reduction interventions such as mindfulness meditation, aerobic exercise, and yoga. This course will include a lab-like component where we will practice stress-reduction interventions, monitor physiologic stress by tracking heart rate variability, and introduce methods of analyzing functional and structural brain MRI. This course counts as a Neuroscience elective.  SCI (A. Taren, a visiting winter term instructor)

Adrienne Taren, '09, recently completed an MD and PhD at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. Her research focuses on the neuroscience of stress & mindfulness-based stress reduction, and links to behavior and biomarkers of health.

INTD 1181 Dostoevsky: The Brothers Karamazov
Long recognized as a pinnacle of literary art and a canonical work of Western culture, Dostoevsky’s masterpiece, The Brothers Karamazov (1880) was the Russian author’s final towering achievement that sums up his life and work. The plot involves the mysterious murder of a depraved landowner, the        subsequent investigation, sensational trial, and the involvement of his three very different sons in his murder.  In a close reading, we will examine the genesis, background, and notebooks of this novel, its philosophical, religious, and psychological themes, and its narrative technique.  Readings include Notes from Underground (1864) and Dostoevsky’s famous speech celebrating Pushkin. (1881). EUR, LIT (M. Katz)

Michael R. Katz is the C.V. Starr Professor of Russian and East European Studies at Middlebury College.

INTD/GEOG 1183 Landscape: Photography and Geography
In this course we will examine concepts closely associated with geography—place, space, time, and the human landscape—and how these transformed landscape photography into a powerful mechanism for understanding and conveying critical changes in the environment and climate. Students will read, discuss, and apply geographical theory; review and appraise historical and contemporary landscape photographs; participate in field trips/photo shoots, produce their own landscape photos; write analytical papers; and view and critique environmental films. The course will include weekly labs covering digital photo processing and printing and culminate in a public exhibition of student work.  Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. Not open to students who have taken HARC/GEOG 1021. ART (T. Case, a visiting winter term instructor)

Timothy Case, PhD, has applied his interests in place and space to his photographs of the built, manufactured, and natural landscapes.

*Student fee to cover additional supply expense

INTD/SOAN 1185 Children's Play as Social Subversion
In this course we will look at historical and cultural interpretations of children’s play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control acting upon children’s time, space, and freedom, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class, and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work, and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play, exploring and moving beyond the conventional fixed equipment playgrounds which have been called “ghettoes for play” to critically examine material and social environments children create for themselves. SOC (M. Leichter-Saxby, a vising winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett University.

INTD/THEA 1186 The Art of the Argument: Making Your Case with Persuasive Performance
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes presentation. In this course we will practice the fundamentals of writing and delivering arguments to a judge or jury. We will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors to persuade an audience. Against the backdrop of the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Miranda v. Arizona, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers and write and present a persuasive legal argument. Through role-reversal and performance exercises students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose. ART (R. Martin, M. Overbeck, winter term visiting instructors)

INTD 1187 Trust in the Finance Industry
In this course we will review and assess recent challenges of trust in the finance industry, including private and public initiatives to restore such trust. The course will review case studies when financial trust broke down, including the 1971 abandonment of the gold standard, the repeal of Glass Steagall Act in 1999, the sustained financial deregulatory effort at the beginning of the 21st century, the Enron accounting fraud, the Madoff swindle, and the 2008 financial crisis. We will consider both public and private response initiatives to deal with breakdown of trust, and gauge the overall impact of those responses to the likely future of enhancing trust in the finance industry. (F. Van Gansbeke, a winter term visiting instructor)

INTN 1052 Coaching and Issues in Sports
In this team-taught course we will examine coaching and its impact on students from elementary school through the college level. Students will develop a portfolio that will include coaching philosophy, sport psychology, physiology, and sport pedagogy. Each student will learn teaching techniques for his or her sport or sports of interest. Several guest speakers will lead discussions on current issues happening in the world of sports. Outside reading with response papers, in class participation, and a final portfolio will determine the grade. (Open to Juniors and Seniors only). (Athletic Faculty)

Italian

ITAL 0102 Beginning Italian II
This course is a continuation of ITAL 0101, and emphasizes spoken and written Italian and the mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments.  Students attend the Italian table and mandatory film screenings. (ITAL 0101 or equivalent) LNG (S. Mula, T. Van Order)

Japanese

JAPN 0102 First-Year Japanese
This course is an intensive continuation of JAPN 0101.  This course is required for those students wishing to take JAPN 0103 in the Spring. (JAPN 0101) LNG (K. Davis, A. Sasaki, S. Abe)

Latin Studies

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I
The course offers an intensive introduction to the Latin language that prepares students to read the major authors of ancient Roman literature. In addition to their systematic study of grammar and syntax, students translate excerpts from Vergil, Seneca and the Vulgate Bible. This course is designed for students who have had no previous experience with Latin, as well as those who have had some Latin but want to review the fundamentals of grammar. LNG (P. Sfyroeras, C. Star)

Linguistics

LNGT 0250 The Structure of Language: Introduction to Morphology and Syntax
In this course we will focus on two fundamental areas in the study of language structure: morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts (e.g., roots and affixes), whereas syntax studies how words are combined to form larger units (phrases and sentences). Linguistic data for illustration and analysis will be taken both from English and a variety of languages belonging to different language families to help us better understand the unity and diversity of human language with regard to word and sentence structure. The course is intended to enhance students’ skills in linguistic description and analysis, as well as general problem-solving and analytical reasoning skills. DED (M. Walkow, a visiting winter term instructor)

Martin Walkow, Ph.D, has taught linguistics at UCLA and MIT. His research focusses on phenomena of verb-argument agreement and the relationship between syntax and morphology.

LNGT 1006 Language and Media
Social networking, microblogging, and content-sharing platforms are a mainstay of contemporary information flow yet offer and indeed require new ways of using language, approaching textual identity, and modeling author-reader relationships. In this course we will establish which innovations are truly novel, which may endure, and how human language may be changing.   We will first examine public discourse about new media for insights into social beliefs about innovation, youth, and authority.  After learning a suite of tools from contemporary sociolinguistics, we will conduct student-originated research on language phenomena of interest in new media.  (This course counts as an elective towards the minor in Linguistics) SOC (T. Sawin)

Thor Sawin is a member of the applied linguistics faculty at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, teaching course on linguistics and mobile technologies in language learning.   He is the author of several articles and book chapters on language in social media, including performances of multilingualism, gender and faith identities.

Music

MUSC 1006 Who's Afraid of Giuseppe Verdi?
Can't tell a cabaletta from a cannoli?  Do you ever have the uncomfortable feeling that "Kill da wabbit, kill da wabbit" might NOT be the real words to that song?  This course will set you straight.  We will explore the grandeur, passion, subtlety, humor, human insight, and astonishing beauty of opera, from its beginnings in the aristocratic courts of 17th-century Italy to the masterpieces of Handel and Mozart, the larger-than-life canvasses of Verdi and Wagner, the expressionist horrors of Strauss and Berg, and on to the present day. ART, EUR (G. Vitercik)

MUSC 1008 Bob Dylan's America
Few figures in American music have had the far-ranging influence of Bob Dylan, who, willingly or not, personified the social turmoil of the 1960s. In this course we will examine the musical and literary traditions on which Dylan draws (rock 'n' roll, country music, the urban folk revival, and the Beat poets), assess his art of crafting songs, and survey the principal phases of his career. Drawing on a range of biographical and historical materials, we will also consider the relationship between the social movements of the post-1960s and the carefully crafted public persona that Robert Zimmerman named Bob Dylan. ART, NOR (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 1013 The American Musical in Performance
A survey of the American Musical will lay the groundwork for a fully-mounted production of a significant work.  The production, staged at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, will be a collaboration of college faculty, student actors, musicians and designers, and area residents. The production also involves collaboration with the Department of Theater.  A theater major gets advanced credit for designing and building costumes for the show. (Approval required; please contact Doug Anderson at danders@middlebury.edu or Carol Christensen at christen@middlebury.edu) ART (C. Christensen; D. Anderson, H. Weston, visiting winter term instructors)

Douglas Anderson (director) and Carol Christensen (musical director) are now entering their 12th year of creating musical theater productions with Middlebury students, from Falsettos (2006) to Chicago (2016).  They will be joined by conductor Helen Weston.

Neuroscience

NSCI 0325 Evolution and Development of the Brain
Our brains are complex in both structure and function. But why? Why did we evolve to have a nervous system? What cellular and molecular events during development produce this complexity? Students will gain a deep understanding of the structures of the brain, selection factors during evolution, and how the nervous system develops. Through introductory lectures, readings, and discussions, students will discover the fascinating evolutionary history of the human brain. (NSCI 0251 or PSYC 0301; open to junior and senior neuroscience majors; others by waiver). (A. Crocker)


Philosophy

PHIL 1004 Self and Subjectivity
What is the self?  Is there something like a soul, or is the self-nothing more than the body, the brain, or a series of experiences? In this course we will consider the nature of the self from a variety of perspectives, drawing primarily on readings from contemporary philosophy and cognitive science.  Topics will include:  recent embodied conceptions of the self; evidence concerning the self from neuroscience and various forms of psychopathology; narrative and social constructivist views of the self; and the Buddhist view that there is no substantial self, and the transformative potential of recognizing this.  Core readings will be supplemented by literary sources, film screenings, and contemplative exercises concerning the self.  PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL/RELI 1073 “A Book Forged in Hell”: Religion, Enlightenment and Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise
What is the role of religion in a modern state?  When citizens’ religious freedoms collide with state interests, which should prevail? In his Theological-Political Treatise, Spinoza rejected the divine origin of scripture and the authority of religion and set the stage for modern textual criticism. He championed the separation of religion and state and laid the groundwork for modern secularism. One reviewer denounced the Treatise as “a book forged in hell.”  We begin with a close reading of the Treatise and then consider Spinoza’s long legacy: the rise of liberalism and secularism, the origins of modern Biblical criticism, and the reasons why Spinoza has been called “the first modern Jew.” EUR, PHL (R. Schine)

Phyiscs

PHYS 0220 Introduction to Mathematica
Mathematica is a scientific software application that consists of a flexible high-level programming language with thousands of powerful built-in functions for symbolic, numeric, and graphical computation typical of physics and other quantitative fields.  Undergraduates can use Mathematica for coursework, senior projects, and throughout their professional careers.  In this course we will focus on the principles at the core of Mathematica and how these principles unify such a great range of computational capabilities. (PHYS 0109 and 0110; Recommended: MATH 0200 and a traditional “computer programming course” in high school or college) DED, SCI (J. Dunham)

PHYS 1105 Ancient Astronomy
In this course we will learn about astronomy through the lens of ancient civilizations. By studying the civilizations of the Babylonians and Greeks, as well as selected civilizations around the world, we will learn how ancient astronomers determined the sizes of the Earth and Moon as well as distances to bodies in the solar system and how celestial phenomena motivated religious and cultural practice. We will employ hands-on, lab-like activities, and naked-eye observations of the sky along with moderate use of mathematics to learn how our ancestors understood our place in the cosmos. CMP, SCI (E. Glikman)

Political Science

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What are the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of political orders in their quest for justice?  What is the relationship between political life and philosophic reflection? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. We will engage a wide range of political theories within the Western tradition by reading the works of authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Nietzsche, Rousseau, and Arendt. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL, SOC (M. Moslander, H. Pangle, visiting winter term instructors)

Margaret Moslander, '11, is a doctoral candidate in Political Science at The University of Texas at Austin. 

Heather Pangle, '10, is a doctoral candidate in Political Science at Boston College. She specializes in political philosophy and American politics.

PSCI 1003 Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we will examine the history, current condition and prospective future of US-European relations, focusing primarily on transatlantic security aspects but with reference to political and economic contexts and bilateral ties.  The learning process will include lectures, class discussions, guest speakers, a role-playing exercise, and a final policy options paper.  Issues covered include: persistent and changing aspects of the “transatlantic bargain;” the Ukraine crisis and relations with Russia; dealing with Islamic State threats and Middle East turmoil, refugees; impact of 9/11 and the Iraq crisis; NATO’s role in Afghanistan; US-European relations under a new U.S. administration; relations between NATO, the European Union and the UN; alternative futures for transatlantic relations. (This course counts as an elective towards the major in Political Science). (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, EUR, SOC (S. Sloan, a visiting winter term instructor)

Stan Sloan, a former senior U.S. government intelligence, foreign and defense policy expert, and research manager is one of America’s top experts on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and author of numerous opinion and journal articles, monographs, and books, including Defense of the West: NATO, the European Union and the Transatlantic Bargain (2016).

PSCI 1029 Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that didn’t fare as well as we emerged from the Great Recession? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (J. Douglas)

James Douglas, '72, successfully sought the office of Governor in 2002 and was inaugurated as the 80th Governor of Vermont in January, 2003. He was re-elected in 2004, 2006, and 2008.

PSCI 1031 Protest Music in Comparative Perspective
In this course we will examine how marginalized populations around the world use music to interpret, explain, and respond to political, racial, socioeconomic, and gendered inequities.  Because music is produced for a wide audience, it is important for the construction of group identity and a useful means of protest. We will discuss the domestic politics of countries such as Nigeria, Jamaica, the U.S., and Brazil by reading the literature of comparative politics, sociology, and critical race and gender theory.  Our discussion of these topics will help us better understand how power in various forms is used to repress, and how music challenges existing hegemonies. (Comparative Politics) AAL, ART, CMP, SOC (K. Fuentes-George)

PSCI 1154 Crisis Diplomacy
So you want to be National Security Advisor? Crisis Diplomacy deploys the Council on Foreign Relations’ Model Diplomacy simulation suite to illuminate how American foreign policy gets made. We will together recreate the complex environment in which policymakers must operate, one that demands emotional intelligence, strategic vision, thoughtful analysis, and creative and concise arguments. Crisis scenarios may include Drones in Pakistan, Russia and NATO in the Baltics, and Humanitarian Intervention in South Sudan. Students will finish the course with a better understanding of the skills that are desirable for government careers in diplomacy and security. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) NOR (A. Stanger)

PSCI 1155 Adversaries and Allies: Diplomacy in World War II and the Vietnam War
We will examine the diplomacy before and during America's two most traumatic 20th Century wars. We will begin with the diplomatic origins of World War II in Europe, followed by the failed diplomacy between the United States and Japan. Then we will consider negotiations among the Western allied leaders: Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin.  The final half of the course will cover America's engagement in and escalation of the Vietnam War, and then move to Kissinger's secret negotiations with North Vietnam, as well as the troubled relationship between the U.S. and South Vietnam.  HIS (R. Leng)

Russell Leng, '60, is Jermain Emeritus Professor of Political Economy and International Law at Middlebury College.

Psychology

PSYC 1020 Moral Minds
We have all “taken one for the team,” stood loyally by friends, overcome desires to cheat, and helped others before ourselves. We have also all stretched the truth to make ourselves look better, treated others intolerantly, and given preferential treatment to a friend. What motivates us to act in these moral and immoral ways? Are these actions guided by emotion or by reason? Are certain moral ideals respected by people universally? What makes something “moral” in the first place? In this course, we will grapple with these issues by exploring moral psychology from developmental, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives in psychology using primary sources. We will apply theories and concepts in moral psychology to Supreme Court cases, while also becoming attuned to the subtle, often unnoticed patterning of moral psychology in our everyday lives. We will use a variety of formats to address these issues, including theoretical and empirical readings, student-led discussions, essays, small group projects, and oral presentations.  This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC (A. DiBianca Fasoli)

PSYC 1021 Stress & Emotional Regulation
How does our emotional experience influence our well-being, relationships, and daily lives? How does stress affect our ability to manage emotion? In this course we will explore the links between emotion, emotional regulation, stress, self-awareness, and well-being. We will discuss theoretical perspectives and explore the physiological, experiential, and behavioral aspects of emotion regulation. We will consider how stress and other factors influence our ability to manage emotion, especially during adolescence and emerging adulthood. In addition, we will utilize film and music to highlight how emotion is experienced and will explore strategies for enhancing emotion regulation, including mindfulness practices. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC (C. Wagner, a visiting winter term instructor)

Caitlin Wagner ’02, has a master’s degree in mental health counseling and recently completed her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology at the University of Vermont. Caitlin has worked with children, adolescents, and young adults in a variety of settings, including a therapeutic boarding school and the wilderness of Montana.

Religion

RELI 1029 Global Pentecostalism
In this course we will explore the rise of Pentecostalism, a Protestant renewal movement emphasizing charismatic gifts of the Spirit, including speaking in tongues and divine healing.  We will begin by studying the doctrines, musical traditions, and biblical sermons of racially diverse revivalists in early 20th century America.  Then we will examine the movement’s subsequent growth in Latin America, seeking to understand its cultural and political appeal in historically Roman Catholic countries.  Finally, looking at mega churches in Africa and Asia, we will consider how this religious form, with its use of media technology, prosperity theology, and social work, is transforming traditional Christianity. CMP, NOR, CW, HIS, PHL (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI 1039 The Gita in Walden
In the Walden chapter “The Pond in Winter,” Henry David Thoreau recounts a morning spent reading “the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy” of the classic Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita. “The pure Walden water,” he notes, “is mingled with the sacred water of the Ganges.” In this course we will study that curious “mingling” through a comparative reading of Walden and the Bhagavad Gita. As we read these texts side-by-side, we will consider their intellectual contexts of Transcendentalism and Hinduism, and trace the influence of both texts in such thinkers as Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Annie Dillard, and others. LIT, PHL (D. Cooperrider)

Daniel Cooperrider is Pastor at the Weybridge Congregational Church (UCC) in Weybridge, VT. He has an A.B. (2007) from the University of Chicago and a Master of Divinity (M.Div, 2010) from the University of Chicago Divinity School.

RELI 1040 History of Islamic Philosophy and Theology
During the 8th-10th centuries, Muslim intellectuals began engaging with Aristotelian philosophy via a massive Greek-to-Arabic translation movement. Modern opinion has tended to mourn this era as a brief golden age, stifled by religious fanaticism. However, recent scholarship questions the so-called “decline” narrative, arguing that Islamic philosophy and theology flourished into the 20th century. In this course we will survey the key movements and debates of Islamic intellectual history by reading texts by major thinkers like Avicenna and al-Ghazali. We will also read a range of scholarship to understand how and why the historical narrative is undergoing such radical revision. HIS (C. Olson, a visiting winter term instructor)

Caitlyn Olson, '09, is currently pursuing a PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University after spending several years in the Middle East. Her dissertation focuses on the use of Greek logic in Islamic theological texts of 15th-century North Africa.

RELI 1041 Readings in Quran
The Quran is one of the most read and studied books in world history. For more than 1,400 years, scholars have sought to uncover the power and meanings found within the Quran. In this course we will focus on close readings of Islam’s most important text.  We will examine the Quran through multiple theological interpretations, exploring the text’s core themes and teachings.  Important contemporary questions such as the Quran’s relationship to violence and women’s rights will be explored. In doing so, we will seek to understand how this book informs the religious and spiritual understandings of Islam’s 1.8 billion adherents. PHL (B. Scurich, a visiting winter term instructor)

Beau Scurich is Associate Chaplain and Muslim Advisor at Middlebury College.

RELI/ PHIL 1073 “A Book Forged in Hell”: Religion, Enlightenment and Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise
What is the role of religion in a modern state?  When citizens’ religious freedoms collide with state interests, which should prevail? In his Theological-Political Treatise, Spinoza rejected the divine origin of scripture and the authority of religion and set the stage for modern textual criticism. He championed the separation of religion and state and laid the groundwork for modern secularism. One reviewer denounced the Treatise as “a book forged in hell.”  We begin with a close reading of the Treatise and then consider Spinoza’s long legacy: the rise of liberalism and secularism, the origins of modern Biblical criticism, and the reasons why Spinoza has been called “the first modern Jew.” EUR, PHL (R. Schine)

Russian

RUSS 0102 Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent) LNG (T. Portice, M. Walker)

Sociology/Anthropology

SOAN 1032 Cinematic Sociology
In this course we will develop our sociological imagination by viewing, discussing, and analyzing popular films. Rather than considering them simply as "entertainment," we will explore the various ways that popular films can be a vehicle for social commentary, analysis, and criticism, particularly about controversial topics (such as race, gender, sexuality). This course is not open to students who have taken SOAN 0352 or FYSE 1430.  (Sociology). SOC (C. Han)

SOAN/INTD 1185 Children's Play as Social Subversion
In this course we will look at historical and cultural interpretations of children’s play in anthropology, psychology, anarchist theory, the “new sociologies of childhood” and the UK-based field of playwork. We will investigate systems of power and control acting upon children’s time, space, and freedom, and play’s intersection with issues of gender, race, class, and neurodiversity. Through readings, written work, and practical assignments, we will establish a rich understanding of play, exploring and moving beyond the conventional fixed equipment playgrounds which have been called “ghettoes for play” to critically examine material and social environments children create for themselves. SOC (M. Leichter-Saxby, a visiting winter term instructor)

Morgan Leichter-Saxby is an international playwork trainer, co-founder of Pop-Up Adventure Play, and currently working towards her PhD in Playwork at Leeds Beckett University

Spanish & Portuguese

PGSE 0102 Intensive Beginning Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0101 and a pre-requisite for PGSE 0103. (PGSE 0101) LNG (M. Higa)

SPAN 0102 Intensive Beginning Spanish                                 
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101.  This course may not be used to fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. (SPAN 0101) (L. Garcia)

SPAN 1302 Auto-fiction (Autobiographic) Writing
In this course we will focus on the development of personal writing.  Our goal is to produce written material that stems from the realm of our own subjectivity.  Confession, secret, memoire, autobiography, journal, letters, chronicle, and non-fiction writing will be central.  We will achieve our objectives through theory and practice of intimate writing.  We will also have the opportunity to read and discuss literary works of important Hispano-American authors (literature and theoretical works) including Cortázar, González-Valdés, Fernández, Giardinelli, Grijelmo, Larrosa, Latini, Mangel, Onetti, Piglia, Rodríguez, and Vargas Llosa. AAL, LNG (R. Chavez-Castaneda)

Richardo Chavez Castaneda is a Mexican writer with fifty published books. He teaches regularly at Middlebury College.

 

Studio Art

ART 0185 I Draw Therefore I See: Observe, Visualize, and Imagine
Observation. Visualization. Imagination…these are the foundational principles of expressive images.  In this course we will learn how to make drawings using graphite, conté, ink, markers, and collage to develop confidence and a solid understanding of line, value, and perspective. We will also draw the human figure to understand portraiture and anatomy to express our human condition. Conceptually starting in the caves of Altamira with a pit stop at Plato’s cave, spending some time in Obscure Chambers, and emerging enlightened and squinting in a 21st century where nearly every reality is virtual, our class will literally start blindfolded and finish with a short drawing animation. ART (H. Wallner)

ART 1028 Introduction to Painting
This class will cover the technical and conceptual essentials of painting.  Students will learn basic painting skills from building stretcher bars, priming, composition, working with oil paint, and mixing colors. Beyond the basics, students will uncover painting’s specific capacity to underline the intersection of the “stuff of the world” and how we perceive it.  Moving through major movements of 20th century art, students will step into the perceptual and conceptual shoes of these moments and occupy them with their own individual expression.  Importance will be placed on class critiques, dialogue, and building a painting vocabulary. Each student will be required to contribute $150 towards the cost of materials.  This course counts as an elective toward a major or minor in Studio Art. ART (R. W. Horn, a visiting winter term instructor)

Rebecca Watson Horn is an artist, living and working in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.F.A. from Cooper Union and an M.F.A. from Rutgers in painting. She has exhibited at Soloway, NY; Exit Art, NY; Cleopatras, NY; and David Lewis Gallery, NY.

*Included student fee to cover remaining supply expense

ART 1030 A Box of Know-How: Art, Craft, and Problem Solving
Creative problem solving. Abstract thinking. Risk taking.  Strategic thinking.  Adaptability. Are these buzzwords? Perhaps, but they are also skills sought by employers in the 21st century.  In this course we will engage sculptural materials and methodologies intended to awaken creative relationship with your hands. Visual assignments using hand and power tools, basic fabrication methods, and mold making skills will develop a wide range of know-how to engage physical and mental problem solving abilities.  The kinetic and cerebral skills acquired in this course can be applied to any area of intellectual interest. ART (W. Ransom)

ART 1127 Introduction to Black & White Photography
Using a single lens reflex (SLR) film camera and a traditional black & white darkroom, students will master the basics of photography, both in terms of technical skills and aesthetic strategies. In this course students will be introduced to the history of photography and its evolution from traditional to contemporary practices. Students will learn how to expose, develop and print black & white film. Student work will be guided by slide lectures, weekly assignments and peer critiques. A 35mm film camera with manual controls and a $150 fee for materials is required for this course. This course counts as an elective toward a major or minor in Studio Art. ART (G. Gatewood, a visiting winter term instructor)

Gigi Gatewood, '03, is an artist working in photography and video. She received a Fulbright Fellowship to Trinidad & Tobago, and is currently on faculty at International Center of Photography.

ART 1128 Drawing Foundations
The practice of drawing is an investigation into mark making and translation, seeing and perception. In this introductory course we will approach the fundamentals of drawing using traditional and unconventional techniques. Through observational drawing we will build proficiency to describe the world as we see it and as we imagine it. Drawing sessions will make up the majority of classes, with time for informal one-on-one instruction and group critique. Previous drawing experience not required. Each student will be required to purchase materials costing approximately $40.  This course will count as a prerequisite for 0300-level Studio Art courses.  This course counts as an elective toward a major or minor in Studio Art. ART (O. Gardner, a visiting winter term instructor)

Oona Gardner is an artist based in Los Angeles. She earned her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art and has shown her work nationally and internationally, most recently her work is included in the 72nd Scripps Annual.

Theatre

THEA/CRWR 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

THEA 1022 Kennedy Center ACTF Preparation
In this course the designated instructor will work with all Theatre majors who have been selected to participate and compete in this year’s Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival/ New England Region.  The group may include actors, designers, playwrights, directors, and dramaturgs. This course will combine group sessions and individual coaching, and will cover areas such as choice of audition material, critical analysis of text, appropriate research for plays and characters, portfolio preparation, coaching of scenes and monologues, and oral presentation skills.  The instructor will prepare the students and accompany them to the festival during the last week of winter term. (Approval required) (C. Faraone)

THEA 1025 The Performative Landscape
How often do we stop to consider the ways in which we not only move through, but also construct our surroundings?  Landscape, architecture, and the human body interact to shape our day to day perception and experiences.  In this class we will explore how individuals perceive and understand space, while investigating how the manipulation of landscape, architecture, and the human body taken together can affect how individuals interact, communicate, and collaborate.  This course will have a performance element. ART (M. Soule, J. Dunn, visiting winter term instructors)

Matthew Soule, '00, has worked as a scenic designer, carpenter, and painter for DC area theaters. He then received a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, and currently works for the award winning firm Reed Hilderbrand as a licensed landscape architect.

Jay Dunn, '01, has worked an actor in DC regional theater, including Middlebury alumni companies Project Y Theatre and PTP/NYC (formerly Potomac Theatre Project).  Jay received his MFA equivalent at the prestigious L’Ecole Jacques Lecoq in Paris, and currently teaches at The American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York.

THEA/INTD 1186 The Art of the Argument: Making Your Case with Persuasive Performance
Vocal tone, body language, and delivery can be the deciding factors in a courtroom decision or any high stakes presentation. In this course we will practice the fundamentals of writing and delivering arguments to a judge or jury. We will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors to persuade an audience. Against the backdrop of the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Miranda v. Arizona, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers and write and present a persuasive legal argument. Through role-reversal and performance exercises students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose. ART (R. Martin, M. Overbeck, winter term visiting instructors)

Writing Program

WRPR 1005 Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using Louise De Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, essays, and book excerpts that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own personal narratives in a workshop setting. CW, LIT (J. Crystal, a visiting winter term instructor)

Jennifer Crystal,'00, is a writer and educator in Boston who focuses on writing to heal projects, narrative medicine, and travel writing. She teaches creative writing seminars and workshops at Grub Street Writing Center and is the author of Et Voilà: One Traveler’s Journey from Foreigner to Francophile. She is a weekly columnist for the Global Lyme Alliance, and is working on a book about her medical trajectory.

WRPR 1006 Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including personal columns, op-eds, critical reviews, and letters. We will work on developing critical thinking and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns, and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will publish their polished work on a class blog, and use social media to attract readers. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints. CW (S. Greenberg, a visiting winter term instructor)

Susan H. Greenberg is a journalist, essayist, and book editor. Her work has appeared in such publications as Newsweek, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Scientific American, and Middlebury magazine.

Off-Campus Courses

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

MIIS 8500A Design, Partnering, Management, & Innovation (DPMI) – Monterey, California*

Please Note that a waitlist is not generated before registration begins or before a class is fully enrolled.