Middlebury

 

Sections

« Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Winter 2013 »

CLAS0131A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0131A-F12

CRN: 92487

Archaic and Classical Greece

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0131Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0131Y-F12

CRN: 92488

Archaic and Classical Greece
Discussion

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0131Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0131Z-F12

CRN: 92489

Archaic and Classical Greece
Discussion

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0144B-F12

CRN: 92490

Literature of the Roman Empire

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0144A-F12

CRN: 92491

Literature of the Roman Empire

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144Y-F12

CRN: 92492

Literature of the Roman Empire
Discussion

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144Z-F12

CRN: 92493

Literature of the Roman Empire
Discussion

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150B-F12 CMLT0150A-F12 CMLT0150B-F12

CRN: 91551

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F12 CMLT0150A-F12 CMLT0150B-F12

CRN: 91634

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150X-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150X-F12

CRN: 91635

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150Y-F12

CRN: 91636

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150Z-F12

CRN: 91637

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0450A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0701A-F12 CMLT0450A-F12

CRN: 90193

History of Class Lit

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0500A-F12

CRN: 90545

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-F12

CRN: 90568

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-F12

CRN: 90569

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-F12

CRN: 90992

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-F12

CRN: 90570

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-F12

CRN: 90959

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500G-F12

CRN: 90993

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-F12

CRN: 90208

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-F12

CRN: 90210

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-F12

CRN: 90212

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-F12

CRN: 90213

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-F12

CRN: 90702

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-F12

CRN: 90995

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505G-F12

CRN: 90996

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-F12

CRN: 90215

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-F12

CRN: 90703

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-F12

CRN: 90704

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-F12

CRN: 90705

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-F12

CRN: 90706

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-F12

CRN: 90960

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700G-F12

CRN: 90998

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0701A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F12 CMLT0450A-F12

CRN: 90198

Hist of Class Lit: Gen Exam
Hist of Class Lit

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0201A-F12

CRN: 92496

Intermediate Greek: Prose

Intermediate Greek: Attic Prose-Lysias & Plato *
Readings in major authors. (formerly CLAS 0203) 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0401A-F12

CRN: 92497

Adv Readings Greek Lit I

Advanced Readings in Greek Literature: Aristotle’s Ethics & Politics
Readings in major authors. (formerly CLAS 0403) 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0301A-F12

CRN: 92498

Readings in Latin Literature I

Readings in Latin Literature I: Roman Epic and Empire
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0501A-F12

CRN: 92499

Adv Readings in Latin III

Advanced Readings in Latin III: Historians & Historiography
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.