Sections

« Winter 2018 Spring 2018

CLAS0143A-S18

CRN: 22191

Rise & Fall of Roman Republic
The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
This course is an introduction to the literature, politics, culture and history of the Roman Republic (c.509-31BCE) - a period which saw Rome grow from a small city on the Tiber to the supreme power in the Mediterranean, and also saw the development of Latin literature. Our readings cover a broad variety of literary genres and authors: comedy (Plautus and Terence), lyric (Catullus), epic (Ennius), political speeches and letters (Cicero), history (Caesar, Sallust, Polybius), and didactic philosophy (Lucretius). As we read we will be careful to investigate how these texts present different and often conflicting ideas of what it means to be Roman, as well as how different ideologies of Rome compete throughout each work. 3 hrs. lect. 1hr. disc.

CLAS0190A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0190A-S18

CRN: 22192

Greek and Roman Comedy
Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331B-S18 HIST0331A-S18 HIST0331B-S18

CRN: 22193

Sparta And Athens
Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331B-S18

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331A-S18 HIST0331A-S18 HIST0331B-S18

CRN: 22194

Sparta And Athens
Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331X-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331X-S18

CRN: 22488

Sparta And Athens
Discussion
Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331Y-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331Y-S18

CRN: 22490

Sparta And Athens
Discussion
Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331Z-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331Z-S18

CRN: 22492

Sparta And Athens
Discussion
Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0420A-S18

CRN: 20400

Seminar in Classical Lit
Humanism of Herodotus
Seminar in Classical Literature: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. The story of this unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this seminar we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature. 3 hrs. sem.

CLAS0500A-S18

CRN: 20250

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-S18

CRN: 20529

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-S18

CRN: 20621

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-S18

CRN: 20259

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-S18

CRN: 20531

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S18

CRN: 20548

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-S18

CRN: 20726

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-S18

CRN: 20727

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-S18

CRN: 20729

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-S18

CRN: 20730

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S18

CRN: 20533

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-S18

CRN: 20733

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-S18

CRN: 20734

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-S18

CRN: 20736

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-S18

CRN: 20737

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0102A-S18

CRN: 22122

Beginning Greek II
Beginning Greek II
This course completes the introductory course offered in Winter Term and will conclude with a reading of Plato's dialogue, Ion. 6 hrs. lect.

GREK0302A-S18

CRN: 22123

Readings in Greek Lit II
Readings in Greek Literature II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0202A-S18

CRN: 22126

Intermediate Latin: Poetry
Intermediate Latin: Poetry
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0402A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
LATN0502A-S18

CRN: 22127

Advanced Readings in Latin II
Advanced Readings in Latin II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0502A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
LATN0402A-S18

CRN: 21464

Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Advanced Readings in Latin IV: Flavian Literature
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Eve Adler Department of Classics

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

fax 802-443-2077