Middlebury

 

Sections

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CMLT0101A-S12

CRN: 22261

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101B-S12

CRN: 22262

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101C-S12

CRN: 22263

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101D-S12

CRN: 22332

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101Z-S12

CRN: 22264

Intro to World Literature
Discussion

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0190A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0190A-S12 CLAS0190B-S12 CMLT0190B-S12

CRN: 22376

Greek and Roman Comedy
Please register via CLAS 0190A

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0190B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0190A-S12 CLAS0190B-S12 CMLT0190A-S12

CRN: 22377

Greek and Roman Comedy
Please register via CLAS 0190B

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0190X-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0190X-S12

CRN: 22378

Greek and Roman Comedy
Please register via CLAS 0190X

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0190Y-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0190Y-S12

CRN: 22379

Greek and Roman Comedy
Please register via CLAS 0190Y

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0190Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0190Z-S12

CRN: 22380

Greek and Roman Comedy
Please register via CLAS 0190Z

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT02990-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299A-S12

CRN: 22265

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299A

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0299B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299B-S12

CRN: 22388

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299A

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0299Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299Z-S12

CRN: 22266

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299Z

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0361A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
CHNS0361A-S12

CRN: 22390

Ancient Poetics
Please register via CHNS 0361A

Ancient Poetics: China and the Greco-Roman World
In this course we will examine questions that have rankled human beings for millennia: What constitutes a great work of literature? What ends does it serve, and how does its structure aesthetically achieve these ends? While we will not endeavor to answer these questions definitively, we will explore theories of aesthetics elaborated in two of the world’s great literary traditions, the Chinese and the Greco-Roman. To what extent do these cultures’ answers resemble one another, and where do they diverge? Is poetic value culturally circumscribed, or do both traditions attempt to articulate universal norms, each within its unique context? Through close readings of primary texts, we will examine some of the guidelines ancient theorists established for the production of literature that not only expresses the author’s innermost sentiments but also—in Horace’s words—both pleases and instructs. Primary texts to be examined from the Chinese tradition include the Great Preface to the Book of Poetry, Lu Ji’s Poetic Exposition on Literature, and Liu Xie’s Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons. Texts from the Western tradition include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, and Horace’s Art of Poetry. (Three college-level literature courses or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. sem. CMP (R. Handler-Spitz)

CMLT0500A-S12

CRN: 22274

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500B-S12

CRN: 22275

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required