Middlebury

 

Sections

« Fall 2014 Spring 2015

CMLT0101A-S15

CRN: 21279

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101B-S15

CRN: 21280

Intro to World Literature

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101Z-S15

CRN: 21282

Intro to World Literature
Discussion

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0205A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-S15

CRN: 21480

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0238A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238A-S15

CRN: 22526

Literature Mystical Experience
Please register via RELI 0238A

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0238X-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238X-S15

CRN: 22527

Literature Mystical Experience
Please register via RELI 0238X

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0238Y-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238Y-S15

CRN: 22528

Literature Mystical Experience
Please register via RELI 0238Y

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0305A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0305A-S15

CRN: 22084

Love Stories
Please register via ENAM 0305A

Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Pre 1800)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0309A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0309A-S15

CRN: 22424

Contemporary Literature
Please register via ENAM 0309A

Contemporary Literature
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0317A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0317A-S15

CRN: 22441

Lost & Found in Translation

Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0373A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0373A-S15

CRN: 22015

The Novel and the City
Please register via ENAM 0373A

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

CMLT0375A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
PGSE0375A-S15

CRN: 22447

Colonial Discourse/Lusophone
Please register via PGSE 0375A

Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World”
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0500A-S15

CRN: 21287

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500B-S15

CRN: 21288

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500C-S15

CRN: 21639

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-S15

CRN: 21866

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700B-S15

CRN: 21867

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700C-S15

CRN: 22032

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.