Middlebury

 

Yumna Siddiqi

Associate Professor of English and American Literatures

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Phone: work802.443.3473
Office Hours: Fall Term: Monday and Wednesday 4:10 - 4:30, Tuesday 2:00 - 4:30, and by appointment
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Yumna Siddiqi’s areas of specialization are postcolonial South Asian, African and Caribbean literature, postcolonial theory, diaspora and migration studies, literary theory, 19th and 20th Century British literature, and gender studies. Her book Anxieties of Empire and the Fiction of Intrigue (Columbia University Press, 2008) explores the contradictions of postcolonial modernity in turn of the 19th and turn of the 20th century fiction of detection and espionage. She has published articles on postcolonial literature and culture in Cultural Critique, Victorian Literature and Culture, Renaissance Drama, Alif, and South Asia Research. Her current research is on labour migration from South Asia, gender, and literature and culture. She also teaches courses on social movements, and on Marxism. Yumna did her Ph. D. at Columbia University in New York under the direction of Edward Said. She grew up in Bombay by the sea.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CRWR 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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CRWR 0701 - Senior Thesis:Creative Writing      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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CRWR 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0711)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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ENAM 0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CW LIT

Fall 2014

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ENAM 0202 - British Lit. & Culture II      

British Literature and Culture II (1700-Present): Home and Away
This course introduces the extraordinary diversity and complexity of British literature from 1700 to the present. We will read seminal works of poetry, fiction, and drama from this period, focusing our attention on key issues such as national identity, stylistic revolution, canon formation, sexual politics, and the representation of cultural otherness. We will trace changes and continuity in this rich literary tradition and discuss literature's relation to key social and historical developments. Writers to be studied include Swift, Austen, the Romantic poets, the Brontës, Tennyson, Browning, Wilde, Yeats, Eliot, Woolf, Roy and Stoppard. For majors and non-majors. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012

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ENAM 0205 / CMLT 0205 - Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory      

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2012

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ENAM 0270 / CMLT 0270 - South Asian African Carib Lit      

In Other Worlds: South Asian, African and Caribbean Fiction*
The purpose of the course is to examine a cross-section of the literature that has been marked by the experience of European colonialism and its aftermath. In addition to discussing a range of writing from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, we will explore the criticism and the theoretical debates that this postcolonial literature has spawned. Topics will include orientalism, colonial discourse analysis, critiques of colonialism, resistance theories, subaltern studies, nationalism, postcolonial gender studies, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss novels by Monica Ali, Indra Sinha, Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, Assia Djebar and others. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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ENAM 0371 / GSFS 0371 - Postcolonial Women Writers      

In Different Voices: Postcolonial Writing by Women
In her important essay “Under Western Eyes,” Chandra Talpade Mohanty suggests that the experiences of women from the so-called Third World have to be understood in their own terms, rather than through the lens of Western feminism. Focusing on writings by Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Merle Hodge, Dionne Brand, Mahasweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, among others, we will examine how women from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean use fiction, poetry, and memoir to address a variety of concerns: familial relationships, caste, class, race, religious identity, history, education, work, national liberation, modernization, development, migration, diaspora, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Spring 2014

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ENAM 0373 / CMLT 0373 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2014

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ENAM 0440 - Postcolonial Literature Theory      

Postcolonial Literature and Theory
The field of postcolonial studies addresses the literature and culture of regions that have been marked by the experience of European colonialism. Today Postcolonial writers and critics are at the cutting edge of creative and scholarly work around the world. We will read literature by writers such as Wole Soyinka, Assia Djebar, Patrick Chamoiseau, Michelle Cliff, Mahasweta Devi, and Salman Rushdie, We will consider these works alongside theory, history, and anthropology in order to explore their political, cultural, and literary dynamics. We will address such topics as: critiques of colonialism, nationalism, social movements, postcolonial gender studies, development, neocolonialism, globalization, migration, and diaspora.

AAL CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2012

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ENAM 0447 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2013

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ENAM 0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENAM 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
(Approval Required)

Fall 2011

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ENAM 0700 - Senior Essay: Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENAM 0701 - Senior Essay: Creative Writing      

Senior Essay: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2011

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ENAM 0710 - Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014

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ENAM 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2011

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FYSE 1158 - Passages from India      

Passages from India
In this seminar, we will focus on the literature, politics, and culture of 20th century India. We will discuss writing by Raja Rao, Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Ismat Chughtai, Mahashweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, and others. Drawing on both popular and documentary films, we will explore this literature in the contexts of colonialism, nationalism, class and caste politics, gender, the state, regionalism, religion, notions of development, and globalization. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CW LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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INTD 1075 - Debating Global Literature      

Debating Global Literature: Ngugi Wa Thiongo's The Wizard of the Crow
In this interdisciplinary course, we will analyze eminent Kenyan writer Ngugi Wa Thiongo’s magisterial novel The Wizard of the Crow in the context of current debates on globalization, world literature, colonial and postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, and gender studies. Set in a fictional African country, the novel weaves together the stories of corrupt political leaders and the ordinary folk who use extraordinary means—wizardry, underground organizing, and ritual performances—to oppose them and carve out a place for themselves. Readings for the course will include Ngugi’s novel as well as theoretical readings from the fields of postcolonial studies, politics, history, development studies, and anthropology.

AAL LIT SOC WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2013

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WAGS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

Spring 2013

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