Sections

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GSFS0180A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0180A-F16

CRN: 92175

Critical Studies of Sport
Please register via AMST 0180A
Critical Studies of Sport
Sports offer important contexts for the study of social relations, inequalities, and differences in North America. Sports exist as an important arena where ideas around class, gender, sexuality, race, ability, and status are embodied and performed. In this course we will discuss the significance of sports to ideas of the self as well as in broader cultural, social, economic, and political realms. We will analyze a variety of issues including the relationship of sports to media, celebrity, money, religion, and education. We will also investigate the significance of sports and athletes to contemporary processes of globalization. (Not open to students who have taken AMST 1003).

GSFS0189A-F16

CRN: 92561

Intro to Queer Critique
Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0191A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0191A-F16

CRN: 91490

Intro to Sociology of Gender
Introduction to Sociology of Gender
What is gender and what would a sociology of it look like? When did gender become a category of inquiry and more importantly why? We will look at how the meaning and performance of gender changed over time, from Classical Greece to Victorian England, to the contemporary U.S. We will also look at how gender changes depending on one’s position in social space, e.g. one’s race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, we will consider how the need to look at gender is the result of a variety of discourses, from psychoanalysis to capitalism to movements of liberation such as feminism. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0200A-F16

CRN: 91491

Foundations in GSFS Studies
Foundations in GSFS
Foundations in Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0208A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0208A-F16

CRN: 92407

Black Womanhood/Pop. Culture
Please register via AMST 0208A
Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0223A-F16

CRN: 92384

Intro to Gay/Lesbian Studies
Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies
This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen

GSFS0250A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0250A-F16 JAPN0250B-F16 GSFS0250B-F16

CRN: 91916

Gender in Japan
Please register via JAPN 0250A
Gender in Japan (in English)
In this course we will examine changing ideas about gender and sexuality in Japan in the 10th through 20th centuries, with special attention to the modern period. Sources will include literary texts, films, and social/historical studies. We will discuss topics, including women's writing in classical Japan; the commercialization of sexuality in the 18th century; ideas of "homosexuality" in late-medieval and modern times; and women's social roles and political struggles in the 20th century. 3 hr. lect./disc.

GSFS0250B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0250A-F16 GSFS0250A-F16 JAPN0250B-F16

CRN: 92523

Gender in Japan
Please register via JAPN 0250B
Gender in Japan (in English)
In this course we will examine changing ideas about gender and sexuality in Japan in the 10th through 20th centuries, with special attention to the modern period. Sources will include literary texts, films, and social/historical studies. We will discuss topics, including women's writing in classical Japan; the commercialization of sexuality in the 18th century; ideas of "homosexuality" in late-medieval and modern times; and women's social roles and political struggles in the 20th century. 3 hr. lect./disc.

GSFS0261A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0261A-F16

CRN: 92485

Globalizing Gender
Please register via SOAN 0261A
Globalizing Gender
In this course we will explore gender and the process of gendering as a complex and evolving global phenomenon of the 21st century. The readings will focus on the politics and experience of gender and sexualities in various parts of the world, including India, Pakistan, Muslim minorities in South Asia, and among diasporic communities in Europe and the United States. Through lectures and small group discussions, we will critique and analyze themes including third gender, masculinity, changing practices of marriage, the politics of sexuality, and the impact of the women’s movement, and gay rights movement on existing understanding of gendered traditions. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0264A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0264A-F16

CRN: 92387

Indian Cinema Romance
Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0267A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0267A-F16

CRN: 92030

Gender, Sexuality, and Media
Please register via FMMC 0267A
Gender and Sexuality in Media
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

GSFS0284A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0284A-F16

CRN: 92543

Modern Dance History in U.S.
Please register via DANC 0284A
Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations
In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen.

GSFS0307A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0307A-F16

CRN: 92491

Human Sexuality
Please register via PSYC 0307A
Human Sexuality
In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0329A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0329B-F16

CRN: 92562

Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0329B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0329A-F16

CRN: 92592

Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0343A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0343A-F16

CRN: 92570

Comparative Borderlands
Please register via SPAN 0343A
Comparative Borderlands: Feminist Cultural Politics of Latin@ and Filipin@ Diasporas
Is it productive to think of Filipinos as the lost “Latinos of Asia”? In this course we will think through borders formed through the political convulsions of U.S. and Spanish imperialisms. Conventionally understood as discrete formations, this course will bring the American Borderlands and the Hispanic Philippines into a transpacific and transnational feminist conversation. Centering the radical heterogeneity of Filipin@ and Latin@ diasporas, we will examine culture as sites of struggle offering ways of thinking comparatively across time, space, language and colonialism as well as through dimensions of difference like class, race, gender, sexuality, and ability. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0373A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373A-F16

CRN: 91492

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373A
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373X-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373X-F16

CRN: 91493

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373X
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373Y-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373Y-F16

CRN: 91494

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373Y
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373Z-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373Z-F16

CRN: 91495

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373Z
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0376A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0376A-F16

CRN: 92442

Politics of Identity
Please register via SOAN 0376A
Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0382A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0382A-F16

CRN: 92441

Two Female Mexican Icons
Please register via SPAN 0382A
Two Female Mexican Icons: The Virgin of Guadalupe and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz
If one wanted to choose the most representative female figures from all of Mexican history, there is no doubt that Sor Juana and the Virgin of Guadalupe would be the two who have most impacted Mexican society. In this course we will first concentrate on the Guadalupe and will trace her transformation from the 16th- through the 21st century. In spite of a number of polemics around the veracity of her apparitions, she has consolidated herself as the symbol of the Mexican nation. Even in the 21st century, the Virgin of Guadalupe continues to be the most important religious icon in Mexican society. We will read historical documents and poetry, and will give attention to the colonial and contemporary art on the topic. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz is considered the first feminist of the New World. We will study some of her most representative pieces, and also her response to the ‘creation’ of the Guadalupe myth. Not open to students who have taken SPAN/WAGS 1015. (Any two 0300-level Spanish course)

GSFS0384A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0384A-F16

CRN: 92489

Women, Religion, & Ethnography
Please register via RELI 0384A
Women, Religion, and Ethnography
In this course we will focus on ethnographic scholarship regarding women in various religious traditions. We will begin with questions of feminist ethnography as proposed by Lila Abu-Lughod and then read a range of ethnographies focusing on women in different contexts, including a female Muslim healer in South India, Kalasha women in Pakistan, Bedouin Muslim women in Egypt, and Catholic nuns in Mexico. We will focus on how gendered and religious identities are constructed and intertwined, and what ethnography contributes to the study of both religion and gender. A prior course in Religion, Anthropology, or Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies is recommended. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0413A-F16

CRN: 92388

White People
White People
White people are often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will begin by considering the formation of whiteness in post Civil War America. We will read histories of whiteness, such as Grace Elizabeth Hale's Making Whiteness, as well as consider important milestones in whiteness, from the films Birth of a Nation and Gone With The Wind to the blog "What White People Like." Finally we will use essays, blogs, photographs, and videos to make white people at Middlebury visible by documenting how they represent themselves through language, dress, and rituals. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology)

GSFS0500A-F16

CRN: 91496

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500B-F16

CRN: 91497

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-F16

CRN: 91607

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-F16

CRN: 92576

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700A-F16

CRN: 91498

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-F16

CRN: 91499

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-F16

CRN: 91601

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700D-F16

CRN: 92577

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710A-F16

CRN: 91500

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-F16

CRN: 91501

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-F16

CRN: 91608

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-F16

CRN: 92578

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753