Sections

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GSFS0172A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0172A-S16

CRN: 22148

Writing, Gender & Sexuality
Please register via CRWR 0172A
Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Claire, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with choreographer Maree Remalia to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

GSFS0191A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0191A-S16

CRN: 22170

Intro to Sociology of Gender
Introduction to Sociology of Gender
What is gender and what would a sociology of it look like? When did gender become a category of inquiry and more importantly why? We will look at how the meaning and performance of gender changed over time, from Classical Greece to Victorian England, to the contemporary U.S. We will also look at how gender changes depending on one’s position in social space, e.g. one’s race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, we will consider how the need to look at gender is the result of a variety of discourses, from psychoanalysis to capitalism to movements of liberation such as feminism. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0200A-S16

CRN: 21492

Foundations in GSFS Studies
Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0207A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207A-S16 ECON0207B-S16 GSFS0207B-S16

CRN: 21969

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207A
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0207B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207A-S16 GSFS0207A-S16 ECON0207B-S16

CRN: 22548

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207B
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0209A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0209A-S16

CRN: 21948

Gender Health Environment
Please register via ENVS 0209A
Gender Health Environment
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0223A-S16

CRN: 22543

Intro to Gay/Lesbian Studies
Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies
This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen

GSFS0224A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0224A-S16

CRN: 22428

Race and Ethnicity in the US

GSFS0236A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0236A-S16 HEBM0236B-S16 GSFS0236B-S16

CRN: 22396

Israel from the Margins
Please register via HEBM 0236A
Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0236B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0236A-S16 GSFS0236A-S16 HEBM0236B-S16

CRN: 22492

Israel from the Margins
Please register via HEBM 0236B
Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0280A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280A-S16 CLAS0280B-S16 GSFS0280B-S16

CRN: 22388

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Please register via CLAS 0280A
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0280B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280A-S16 GSFS0280A-S16 CLAS0280B-S16

CRN: 22500

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Please register via CLAS 0280B
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0280X-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280X-S16

CRN: 22502

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Please register via CLAS 0280X
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0280Y-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280Y-S16

CRN: 22504

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Please register via CLAS 0280Y
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0280Z-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280Z-S16

CRN: 22506

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Please register via CLAS 0280Z
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0284A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0284A-S16

CRN: 22576

Modern Dance History in U.S.
Please register via DANC 0284A
Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations
In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen.

GSFS0285A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S16

CRN: 21586

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285A
Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0307A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0307A-S16

CRN: 22401

Human Sexuality
Please register via PSYC 0307A
Human Sexuality
In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0320A-S16

CRN: 21493

Topics in Feminist Theory
Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. Each semester the instructor will choose a particular topical lens through which to examine some of the foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

GSFS0323A-S16

CRN: 22375

Dogs in Cultures of Difference
Dog Ears: Dogs in Cultures of Difference
In this course we will investigate the ways dog cultures and cultural dogs reflect and are used to reflect upon categories of human difference such as gender, race, age, disability, sexuality, and class. We will discuss human-dog relationships and their histories and material practices (from dog boutiques to dog fighting, from service dogs to soldier dogs) and we will look closely at how dogs have been represented using literature, film, and other examples. We will approach dogs as our “companion species” (Donna Haraway) drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives ranging from feminist and transgender studies to history, animal studies, and legal studies. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0356A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
PGSE0356A-S16

CRN: 22448

Murdered Women: Port & Brazil
Please register via PGSE 0356
Murdered Women: Politics and Literary Representation in Portugal and Brazil
In this course we will study the tragic history of three women ordered to be executed by political chiefs for political reasons. The course's aim is twofold: to analyze, in their historical frameworks, the political ideologies used to justify the women's murders, and to examine through textual analysis how these events are represented in fictional and non-fictional literature. The women are Inês de Castro (1320-1355), the lover of the Portuguese Prince Pedro; Olga Benario (1908-1942), the Jewish-German wife of the Brazilian communist leader Luís Carlos Prestes; and Elza Fernandes (1918-1934), the girlfriend of a high member of the communist party in Brazil. Inês was killed because her imminent marriage to Pedro could have rendered Portugal politically unstable. Olga died in a Nazi concentration camp, to which she was sent by Prestes' enemy Getúlio Vargas, then President of Brazil. Elza was accused of political betrayal and eventually murdered by communist party members, with the support of Luís Carlos Prestes. Readings will include poetry, a biography, and a historical novel. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0358A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0358A-S16

CRN: 22475

Theories of Spectatorship
Please register via FMMC 0358A
Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

GSFS0361A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0361A-S16

CRN: 22360

Anthropology of Pakistan
Please register via SOAN 0361A
Anthropology of Pakistan
In this course we will explore the structure and meaning of Pakistanis’ everyday lives. We will discuss large-scale forces like colonialism, Partition, and the War on Terror, but the focus will be on the ways these forces affect people whose names will never appear in news reports or history books. We will focus particularly on the experiences of women. Readings will include anthropological theory, ethnography, and fiction. In addition, we will also watch some Bollywood cinema. (Prior coursework in SOAN recommended) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

GSFS0376A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0376A-S16

CRN: 22474

Politics of Identity
Please register via SOAN 0376A
Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0388A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0388A-S16

CRN: 22447

Gender/Violence-Hispanic World
Please register via SPAN 0388
Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0393A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0393A-S16

CRN: 21494

Gender in Early America
Please register via HIST 0393A
A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GSFS0457A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0457A-S16 ENAM0457B-S16 GSFS0457B-S16

CRN: 22372

Double Consciousness
Please register via ENAM 0457A
History of Double Consciousness: Mourning, Melancholia, and Anxiety
In this seminar we will investigate the intellectual history of the idea of double consciousness—first developed by W.E.B. Du Bois. We will read critical race and feminist theory alongside psychoanalytic theory to analyze the psyche as the battleground not only for racial formation but also for sexual and gender identities. Each of these identities produces double consciousness that manifests as mourning, melancholia, or anxiety. We will explore their historical productions, interpretations, and misinterpretations in theory and literature. Authors may include Judith Butler, Frantz Fanon, Paul Gilroy, Saidiya Hartmann, bell hooks, Melanie Klein, Hortense Spillers, Gayatri Spivak, and Claudia Tate. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0457B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0457A-S16 GSFS0457A-S16 ENAM0457B-S16

CRN: 22570

Double Consciousness
Please register via ENAM 0457B
History of Double Consciousness: Mourning, Melancholia, and Anxiety
In this seminar we will investigate the intellectual history of the idea of double consciousness—first developed by W.E.B. Du Bois. We will read critical race and feminist theory alongside psychoanalytic theory to analyze the psyche as the battleground not only for racial formation but also for sexual and gender identities. Each of these identities produces double consciousness that manifests as mourning, melancholia, or anxiety. We will explore their historical productions, interpretations, and misinterpretations in theory and literature. Authors may include Judith Butler, Frantz Fanon, Paul Gilroy, Saidiya Hartmann, bell hooks, Melanie Klein, Hortense Spillers, Gayatri Spivak, and Claudia Tate. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0500A-S16

CRN: 21495

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500B-S16

CRN: 21496

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-S16

CRN: 21599

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-S16

CRN: 22583

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700A-S16

CRN: 21497

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-S16

CRN: 21498

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710A-S16

CRN: 21499

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-S16

CRN: 21500

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-S16

CRN: 22584

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753