Sections

« Winter 2019 Spring 2019

GSFS0172A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0172A-S19

CRN: 21767

Writing, Gender & Sexuality
Please register via WRPR 0172A
Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Clare, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with a visiting choreographer to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0202A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0202A-S19

CRN: 22550

Intro to Women's Resistance
Introduction to Women’s Resistance
Students will explore core themes and tensions in women’s resistance. How do we define women, and how do women define themselves? How do we conceive of resistance? What do women seek to change through their activism? How do they organize collectively? What has influenced their successes, and their failures? We will focus on women’s resistance in the United States, but we will examine forms of struggle that are linked globally. Topics include abolition, women’s suffrage, women’s liberation, civil rights, environmental movements, reproductive justice, environmental justice, Black Lives Matter, first food justice, #metoo, transgender rights, and human rights. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0211A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0211A-S19

CRN: 22003

Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
Please register via WRPR 0211A
Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female-identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0223A-S19

CRN: 22083

Intro to Gay/Lesbian Studies
Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies
This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen

GSFS0224A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0224A-S19

CRN: 22209

Race and Ethnicity in the US
Please register via AMST 0224A
Formations of Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.
Historical memories, everyday experiences, and possible futures are powerfully shaped by racial and ethnic differences. Categories of race and ethnicity structure social relationships and cultural meanings in the United States and beyond. In this course we will track the theoretical and historical bases of ideas of race and ethnicity in modern America. We will investigate how race and ethnicity intersect at particular historical moments with other forms of difference including gender, sexuality, nation, and class. The course offers an approach informed by critical studies of race including texts in history, political theory, cultural studies, and anthropology. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0254A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0254A-S19

CRN: 22330

American Women Poets
Please register via ENAM 0254A
American Women Poets
We will examine the rich tradition of lyric poetry by women in the U.S. Beginning with the Puritan Anne Bradstreet, one of the New World's earliest published poets, we continue to the 19th century and Emily Dickinson, along with the formidable line of "poetesses" who dominated the popular poetry press in that era. We examine the female contribution to the Modernist aesthetic in figures like Millay, Moore, H.D. and Gertrude Stein; the transformation of modernist ideals by Bishop, Plath, Sexton, and Rich; and, among the postmodernists, Lyn Hejinian and Susan Howe. 3 hrs. lect. (National/Transnational Feminisms)

GSFS0269A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0269A-S19

CRN: 22210

Beyond Intersectionality
Beyond Intersectionality: Developing Anti-Racist and Anti-Capitalist Feminisms
Nearly thirty years ago, Kimberlé Crenshaw published the theory of “intersectionality,” in which she argued that racism and sexism collide to make black women’s marginalization distinct from those of both white women and black men (1989). Today, the terms “intersectionality” and “intersectional feminism” are ubiquitous, utilized by scholars, activists, artists, and our students. In this course, we will consider how discourses of and ideas about intersectionality move between and among spaces of dissent. Starting from the position that it is more epistemologically and politically powerful to state that our feminism is anti-racist and anti-capitalist than to say it is “intersectional,” we will address the following questions: What are the benefits and limits of the original theory of intersectionality? How are academic and activist approaches alike both emboldened and limited by intersectionality? What does it mean to be socially and politically conscious, and how do we move from consciousness to action in ways that are not siloed? Texts may include Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women” (1989) and Ange-Marie Hancock’s Intersectionality: An Intellectual History (2016). (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0289A-S19

CRN: 21761

Introduction to Queer Critique
Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0300A-S19

CRN: 22511

Feminist Theory Envir Justice
Feminist Theory and Environmental Justice
How does our individual standpoint shape what we consider to be unfair? In what ways do decades-old policies shape present-day environmental disparities? Is the human body itself an environment? Where does nature end and humanity begin? In this course, we will use feminist theory to explore key environmental (in)justice concerns. Theoretical frameworks incorporated into this course include ecofeminism, feminist science studies, feminist political ecology, and critical race theory. Students will have the opportunity to examine the relationship between humans and the environment to better understand environmental hazards and racial, class, and gender inequality worldwide. 3 hrs. lect/disc. (This course counts as an approved social science cognate for environmental studies majors.)

GSFS0303A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0303A-S19

CRN: 21657

Outlaw Women
Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, in national and global contexts. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. (Any one GSFS Course) (Critical Race Feminisms; National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0305A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0305A-S19

CRN: 21992

Holocaust/Exile in Translation
Please register via LNGT 0305A
The Holocaust and Exile in Translation
For decades, readers across the globe have learned about the atrocities of the Holocaust through translation. Translators have brought us testimonials, and accounts about imprisonment, life in concentration camps, exile, resistance, and survival during World War II in a wide variety of languages. In this course we will study how translators and publishers have shaped this vibrant literature according to the priorities of different cultural and linguistic communities. Combining theory and praxis, we will analyze the multilingual journeys of influential works such as The Diary of Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel’s Night through a translation studies lens. Students will also translate texts from various genres including autobiography, children’s and young adult literature, subtitle audiovisual testimonial footage and film and get a first exposure to simultaneous interpretation. (Advanced skills in one language in addition to English required). 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0325A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0325A-S19

CRN: 21927

American Misogyny
Please register via AMST 0325A
American Misogyny
In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0372A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0372A-S19

CRN: 22417

Gender and Int'l Relations
Please register via PSCI 0372A
Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/

GSFS0443A-S19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0443A-S19

CRN: 22501

Readings in African History
Please register via HIST 0443A
Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar

GSFS0500B-S19

CRN: 21325

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-S19

CRN: 21390

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-S19

CRN: 21738

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500E-S19

CRN: 22137

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-S19

CRN: 21327

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-S19

CRN: 21397

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700D-S19

CRN: 21739

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700E-S19

CRN: 22559

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700F-S19

CRN: 22560

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700G-S19

CRN: 22623

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-S19

CRN: 21329

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-S19

CRN: 21398

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-S19

CRN: 21740

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753