Middlebury

 

Sections

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GSFS0172A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0172A-S14

CRN: 22313

Writing, Gender & Sexuality
Please register via CRWR 0172A

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

GSFS0200A-S14

CRN: 22242

Foundations in GSFS Studies

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0264A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0264A-S14

CRN: 22243

Indian Cinema Romance
Please register via FMMC 0264A

Indian Cinema: Romance, Nation, and Identity
In this course we will use the lens of romance to examine the world's largest film-making industry. Focusing primarily on Hindi cinema produced in Bombay/Mumbai, we will examine the narrative conventions, aesthetic devices (such as song-dance sequences), and other cinematic conventions that are unique to Indian films' narration of romance. Through a historical overview of films from the silent, colonial, and post-colonial eras into the contemporary era of globalization, we will track how the family is configured, the assignment of gender roles, and how national identity is allegorized through family romance. The course includes weekly screenings of films, which will be sub-titled in English. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0285A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S14 DANC0285B-S14 GSFS0285B-S14

CRN: 22506

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285A

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0285B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S14 DANC0285B-S14 GSFS0285A-S14

CRN: 22507

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285B

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0285Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285Z-S14

CRN: 22508

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285Z

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0304A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S14 SOAN0304B-S14 GSFS0304B-S14

CRN: 22244

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please register via SOAN 0304A

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0304B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S14 SOAN0304B-S14 GSFS0304A-S14

CRN: 22245

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please register via SOAN 0304B

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0314A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S14 SOAN0314B-S14 GSFS0314B-S14

CRN: 22246

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314A

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0314B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S14 SOAN0314B-S14 GSFS0314A-S14

CRN: 22247

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314B

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0320A-S14

CRN: 22248

Topics in Feminist Theory

Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. Each semester the instructor will choose a particular topical lens through which to examine some of the foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

GSFS0330A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0330A-S14

CRN: 22353

Psychology of Gender
Please register via PSYC 0330A

Psychology of Gender *
In this course we will consider biological and psychosocial contributors to similarities and differences between male and female behavior and the brain, focusing on approaches grounded in psychological science. Topics will include aggression, cognition, gender roles, gender identity, sexual orientation, and psychological disorders, as well as issues of the workplace and parenting. Course readings and content will strongly emphasize empirical scientific articles in order to address methodological challenges and controversies. (PSYC 0105; open to psychology, neuroscience and GSFS majors; NSCI seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0341A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0341A-S14

CRN: 22249

Gender Sexuality S. Asian Rel
Please register via RELI 0341A

Gender and Sexuality in South Asian Religions
In this course we will focus on historical and ethnographic scholarship on Hinduism and Islam in South Asia. We will initially draw on the theories of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and third world feminists to examine issues of gender and sexuality. Then we will examine a range of case studies—including colonial interpretations of the Hindu practices of sati, the experiences of devadasis in Telugu south India, an account of a female Muslim healer in Hyderabad, and the religious practices of third-gendered hijras—to address how gender and sexuality are constructed in the religious landscape of South Asian Hinduism and Islam. Prior study of religion or women’s and gender studies is required. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0371A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0371A-S14

CRN: 22330

Postcolonial Women Writers
Please register via ENAM 0371A

In Different Voices: Postcolonial Writing by Women
In her important essay “Under Western Eyes,” Chandra Talpade Mohanty suggests that the experiences of women from the so-called Third World have to be understood in their own terms, rather than through the lens of Western feminism. Focusing on writings by Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Merle Hodge, Dionne Brand, Mahasweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, among others, we will examine how women from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean use fiction, poetry, and memoir to address a variety of concerns: familial relationships, caste, class, race, religious identity, history, education, work, national liberation, modernization, development, migration, diaspora, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0372A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0372A-S14

CRN: 22378

Gender and Int'l Relations
Please register via PSCI 0372A

Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

GSFS0388A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0388A-S14

CRN: 22517

Gender/Violence-Hispanic World
Please register via SPAN 0388A

Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0393A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0393A-S14

CRN: 22250

Gender in Early America
Please register via HIST 0393A

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

GSFS0413A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0413A-S14

CRN: 22521

White People
Please register via SOAN 0413A

White People
White people are often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will begin by considering the formation of whiteness in post Civil War America. We will read histories of whiteness, such as Grace Elizabeth Hale's Making Whiteness, as well as consider important milestones in whiteness, from the films Birth of a Nation and Gone With The Wind to the blog "What White People Like." Finally we will use essays, blogs, photographs, and videos to make white people at Middlebury visible by documenting how they represent themselves through language, dress, and rituals. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology)

GSFS0419A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0419A-S14

CRN: 22251

Gender, Power and Politics
Please register via ENAM 0419A

Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage
In this class we will explore the representation of embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. As we consider the representation of the gendered body on stage or in so-called "closet" dramas, we will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria), the performance of maternity, the portrayal of female "voice" or vocality, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. We will also study the dramatic use of related cultural codes pertaining to betrothal, marriage, cross-dressing, and sexual slander. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Webster's Duchess of Malfi, Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, and Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure. Historical sources will include midwifery manuals, conduct books, medical treatises on hysteria, and legal accounts of betrothal and marriage. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0438A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0438A-S14

CRN: 22252

Woman & Islam
Please register via HIST 0438A

Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, an Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0500A-S14

CRN: 22253

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500B-S14

CRN: 22254

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-S14

CRN: 22534

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700A-S14

CRN: 22255

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-S14

CRN: 22256

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-S14

CRN: 22541

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710A-S14

CRN: 22257

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-S14

CRN: 22258

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-S14

CRN: 22542

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval required)