Sections

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GSFS0189A-S17

CRN: 22406

Intro to Queer Critique
Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0206A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0206A-S17 THEA0206B-S17 GSFS0206B-S17

CRN: 22260

Contemporary Women Playwrights
Please register via THEA 0206A
Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0206B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0206A-S17 GSFS0206A-S17 THEA0206B-S17

CRN: 22493

Contemporary Women Playwrights
Please register via THEA 0206B
Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0206Z-S17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0206Z-S17

CRN: 22495

Contemporary Women Playwrights
Please register via THEA 0206Z
Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0207A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207A-S17 ECON0207B-S17 GSFS0207B-S17

CRN: 21650

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207A
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0207B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207A-S17 GSFS0207A-S17 ECON0207B-S17

CRN: 22094

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207B
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0209A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0209A-S17

CRN: 21642

Gender Health Environment
Please register via ENVS 0209A
Gender Health Environment
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0224A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0224A-S17

CRN: 21984

Race and Ethnicity in the US
Please register via AMST 0224A

GSFS0225A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0225A-S17

CRN: 22356

Feminist Blogging
Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0230A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0230A-S17

CRN: 22264

Gender Images in Pop Am Cult
Please register via AMST 0230A
Gender Images in American Popular Culture
In this course, we will examine representations of gender in American popular culture. Course materials will include nineteenth-century popular music, literature, and theater, early twentieth-century advertising and film, 1950s television, and more recent electronic media. Considering a range of cultural forms over a broad historical period allows us to determine the impact that particular media have had on our conceptions of gender difference. Finally, by becoming critical readers of popular cultural forms that represent manhood and womanhood, we gain a greater appreciation for the complexity, variability, and open-endedness of gender constructions within American life. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0254A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0254A-S17

CRN: 22304

American Women Poets
Please register via ENAM 0254A
American Women Poets
We will examine the rich tradition of lyric poetry by women in the U.S. Beginning with the Puritan Anne Bradstreet, one of the New World's earliest published poets, we continue to the 19th century and Emily Dickinson, along with the formidable line of "poetesses" who dominated the popular poetry press in that era. We examine the female contribution to the Modernist aesthetic in figures like Millay, Moore, H.D. and Gertrude Stein; the transformation of modernist ideals by Bishop, Plath, Sexton, and Rich; and, among the postmodernists, Lyn Hejinian and Susan Howe. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0285A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S17

CRN: 21496

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285A
Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

GSFS0303A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0303A-S17

CRN: 22288

Outlaw Women
Please register via WRPR 0303A
Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. (Any one GSFS Course)

GSFS0304A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-S17

CRN: 22512

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please register via SOAN 0304A
Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0314A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S17 GSFS0314B-S17 SOAN0314B-S17

CRN: 22359

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0314B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S17 GSFS0314A-S17 SOAN0314B-S17

CRN: 22577

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0320A-S17

CRN: 21424

Topics in Feminist Theory
Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. Each semester the instructor will choose a particular topical lens through which to examine some of the foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

GSFS0334A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0334A-S17

CRN: 22533

Hispanic Philippines 1870-1950
Please Register via SPAN 0334
The Hispanic Philippines, 1870-1950: Racial Nationalism, Colonial Impairment, and Cultures of Postcolonial Disability
In this course we will study the Hispanic cultures and literatures of the Philippines in relation to US, Spanish, and Japanese colonialism. The “Ilustración Filipina” or Philippine Enlightenment was a mestizo nationalist movement through which the Filipino nation is normatively said to have been consolidated. Drawing from postcolonial theory and disability studies, this course will ask students to analyze the formation of national identities through representations of disability, impairment, and deficiency.

GSFS0388A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0388A-S17

CRN: 22001

Gender/Violence-Hispanic World
Please register via SPAN 0388
Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0419A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0419A-S17

CRN: 22303

Gender, Power and Politics
Please register via ENAM 0419A
Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I) (Pre-1800)
In this class we will explore the representation of embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. As we consider the representation of the gendered body on stage or in so-called "closet" dramas, we will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria), the performance of maternity, the portrayal of female "voice" or vocality, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. We will also study the dramatic use of related cultural codes pertaining to betrothal, marriage, cross-dressing, and sexual slander. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Webster's Duchess of Malfi, Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, and Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure. Historical sources will include midwifery manuals, conduct books, medical treatises on hysteria, and legal accounts of betrothal and marriage. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0430A-S17

CRN: 22421

Queering Food
Queering Food: Race, Place, and Social Justice
In this course we will examine food studies, politics, and movements through the lenses of queer, feminist, and critical theory (including work that centralizes gender, class, race, disability, sexuality, and place). In doing so, we will consider dominant and subaltern approaches to food both within the U.S. and transnationally. Throughout, we will explore how critical theory can offer alternative conceptualizations of food politics and justice, as well as how an analysis of food might expand our understandings of embodied subjectivities and the various social structures that produce them. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0440A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0440A-S17

CRN: 22398

Reggaeton: Lang, Gender, Ident
Please register via SPAN 0440A
Reggaetón: Language, Gender, & Identity
In this seminar we will examine the origins, development, and dissemination of the popular music genre and cultural phenomenon of reggaetón. In conjunction with scholarly articles on the sociohistorical aspects of reggaetón, we will examine various artists’ lyrics, videos, performances, and interviews, spanning from the 1980s up to the present. Students will acquire the theoretical and technical skills to analyze speech, discourse, and performance across different media in order to explore how (trans)national, ethno-racial, and gender identities are constructed and used to perpetuate, stereotype, and sometimes to contest, ideas of marginal/mainstream masculinities and femininities. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0443A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0443A-S17

CRN: 22542

Readings in African History
Please Register Via HIST 0443
Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar

GSFS0458A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0458A-S17

CRN: 22535

Race, Gender, & Class Politics
Please Register Via PSCI 0458
The U.S. Politics of Race, Gender, and Class
Race, gender, and class have long shaped American politics. They have formed the basis for social movements, have structured institutions, and have affected the way political actors–from voters to activists to elected officials–have made their day-to-day decisions. What do political scientists know about the roles that race, gender, and class play in politics, separately and together, and what do we yet have to learn? (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

GSFS0500A-S17

CRN: 21426

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500B-S17

CRN: 21427

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-S17

CRN: 21505

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-S17

CRN: 22549

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700A-S17

CRN: 21428

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-S17

CRN: 21429

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-S17

CRN: 21512

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700D-S17

CRN: 22550

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710A-S17

CRN: 21430

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-S17

CRN: 21513

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-S17

CRN: 22551

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753