Sections

« Summer Study 2019 Fall 2019 Winter 2020 »

GSFS0191A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
SOCI0191A-F19

CRN: 91351

Gender and the Body
Gender and the Body
What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0200A-F19

CRN: 91352

Feminist Foundations
Feminist Foundations
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Focusing on the histories of feminism in the U.S., from the nineteenth century to the present, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which feminist movements have resisted these processes. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0205A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0205A-F19

CRN: 92443

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
Please register via WRPR 0205A
Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect

GSFS0206A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0206A-F19 THEA0206B-F19 GSFS0206B-F19

CRN: 92431

Contemporary Women Playwrights
Please register via THEA 0206A
Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0206B-F19

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0206A-F19 THEA0206B-F19 GSFS0206A-F19

CRN: 92432

Contemporary Women Playwrights
Please register via THEA 0206B
Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0208A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0208A-F19

CRN: 92235

Black Womanhood/Pop. Culture
Please register via AMST 0208A
Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0209A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0209A-F19

CRN: 92278

Gender Health Environment
Please register via ENVS 0209A
Gender Health Environment
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0210A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0210A-F19

CRN: 92637

History of Sexuality in the US
Please register via HIST 0210A
History of Sexuality in the United States
In this course we will explore sexuality in relation to race, class, gender, and religion in US history using primary and secondary sources. We will study indigenous sexualities and the impact of settler colonialism, sex work during the American Revolution, sexuality under slavery, the medicalization and criminalization of homosexuality, urban gay subcultures, Cold War sexuality, the politics of birth control, sex during the AIDS epidemic, and sexuality from transgender and non-binary perspectives. Beyond learning historiography, we will examine methodological issues with writing histories of sexuality. When relevant, we will study examples from Europe and Canada. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0215A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0215A-F19

CRN: 92617

The Feminine Heroic
Please register via CRWR 0215A
The Feminine Heroic
In this class we will explore the hero’s journey in literature as it relates to women and the natural world: who gets to go on the adventure, and who arrives home, transformed? How do race and gender complicate the traditional man-versus-nature narrative? We will discuss character agency, narrative authority, style, and structure — and look at texts where women undertake the journey, including work by Isak Dinesen, Annie Dillard, Camille Dungy, Rachel Carson, Anne LeBastille, Rahawa Haile, and Pam Houston. Students will generate creative and critical work. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0218A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0218A-F19

CRN: 92487

Women in US Electoral Politics
Please register via INTD 0218A
Women in U.S. Electoral Politics
In this course we will explore the current and historical status of women in U.S. electoral politics, using case studies, guest speakers, hands-on campaign training, and academic and political research. Recent years have been pivotal for women in U.S. politics, with Hillary Clinton's loss in 2016, the historic 2017 Women's March, and the 2018 Year of Women. How have these events affected women in politics specifically and electoral politics generally? Can women achieve political parity with men and why does it matter? How do factors such as race, gender identity, region, and party intersect with electoral success and experience? 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0225A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0225A-F19

CRN: 92308

Feminist Blogging
Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0234A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0234A-F19

CRN: 92374

Philosophy & Feminism
Please register via PHIL 0234A
Philosophy and Feminism
This course will examine the contributions of various feminists and feminist philosophers to some of the central problems of philosophical methodology, epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics, and ethics. Are there gendered assumptions in operation in the way particular philosophical problems are framed? For example, do the politics of gender contribute to accounts of objective knowledge and rationality? Are some philosophical perspectives better suited to the goals of feminism than others? We will also examine the general relationship between feminism and philosophy, and we will reflect on the relevance of theorizing and philosophizing for feminist political practice.

GSFS0235A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
ARBC0235A-F19

CRN: 92242

Gender Politics in Arab World
Please register via ARBC 0235A
Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms)

GSFS0261A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
SOCI0261A-F19

CRN: 92310

Globalizing Gender
Globalizing Gender
In this course we will explore gender and the process of gendering as a complex and evolving global phenomenon of the 21st century. The readings will focus on the politics and experience of gender and sexualities in various parts of the world, including India, Pakistan, Muslim minorities in South Asia, and among diasporic communities in Europe and the United States. Through lectures and small group discussions, we will critique and analyze themes including third gender, masculinity, changing practices of marriage, the politics of sexuality, and the impact of the women’s movement, and gay rights movement on existing understanding of gendered traditions. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0289A-F19

CRN: 92312

Introduction to Queer Critique
Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0324A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0324A-F19

CRN: 92625

Ladies at Work
Ladies at Work: Global Politics of Care, Kinship, and Affect
Why are some forms of work valued more than others? When did people start believing entrepreneurs and innovators when they say, we should “Do What You Love”? Is work life separate from life at home and with friends? This class will journey across global care chains, drawing on feminist writings and ethnographic texts to examine conditions structuring middle class housework in the U.S., garment manufacturing in Sri Lankan factories, call center work in the Philippines, and elite startup innovations in India. Engaging questions of class, race, gender, and heterosexuality, we will learn about forms of feminized work and consider more just alternatives. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0372A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0372A-F19

CRN: 91983

Gender and Int'l Relations
Please register via PSCI 0372A
Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/

GSFS0373A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373A-F19

CRN: 91942

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373A
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373X-F19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373X-F19

CRN: 92344

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373X
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373Y-F19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373Y-F19

CRN: 92345

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373Y
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0373Z-F19

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0373Z-F19

CRN: 92346

History of American Women
Please register via HIST 0373Z
History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

GSFS0384A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0384A-F19

CRN: 92613

Women, Religion, & Ethnography
Please register via RELI 0384A
Women, Religion, and Ethnography
In this course we will focus on ethnographic scholarship regarding women in various religious traditions. We will begin with questions of feminist ethnography as proposed by Lila Abu-Lughod and then read a range of ethnographies focusing on women in different contexts, including a female Muslim healer in South India, Kalasha women in Pakistan, Bedouin Muslim women in Egypt, and Catholic nuns in Mexico. We will focus on how gendered and religious identities are constructed and intertwined, and what ethnography contributes to the study of both religion and gender. A prior course in Religion, Anthropology, or Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies is recommended. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0402A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
SOCI0402A-F19

CRN: 92629

Sex and Society
Please register via SOCI 0402A
Sex and Society
In this seminar we will explore the pleasures, power, and problems of sex and will place sexuality in dynamic interaction with larger social issues. It is impossible to understand sexuality as separate from other dimensions of the human condition such as economics, politics, work, family, race, and gender. In particular, we will examine questions related to the science of sex, morality, monogamy, sex work, power and domination, desire and fantasy, and sexual politics. Overall, students will gain an understanding of sexuality as a social phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0419A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0419A-F19

CRN: 92270

Gender,Power,Politics on Stage
Please register via ENAM 0419A
Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I) (Pre-1800)
In this class we will explore the representation of gendered embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. We will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically “female” disorders (e.g., “suffocation” or hysteria), the performance of maternity, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. Of particular importance will be the representation of the articulate or angry woman as the “shrew” or “scold,” and we will begin the class with an investigation of so-called “shrew-taming” narratives. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew and The Winter’s Tale, Webster’s Duchess of Malfi, and Cavendish’s Convent of Pleasure. We will end the semester with a look at how this material plays out in our current political moment, focusing in particular on the representation of Hillary Clinton, Michelle Obama, and Christine Blasey Ford. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0435A-F19

CRN: 91780

Feminist Engaged Research
Feminist Engaged Research
What makes research feminist? How does one conduct feminist research? How has feminist research been useful to social movements and how have movements informed feminist research? What happens to feminist research when it moves to the public sphere? In this class students learn how to produce original feminist research—how to craft research questions, write a literature review, choose relevant methodologies, and collect and analyze qualitative data. In addition to writing a research paper, students will translate their research findings into an alternative (non-academic paper) format and for an audience beyond our classroom. (GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem.

GSFS0442A-F19

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0442A-F19

CRN: 92474

Transnational Feminist Conserv
Please register via ENVS 0442A
Transnational Feminist Conservation
In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0500B-F19

CRN: 91354

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-F19

CRN: 91447

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-F19

CRN: 91683

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-F19

CRN: 91356

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-F19

CRN: 91441

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700D-F19

CRN: 91684

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-F19

CRN: 91358

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-F19

CRN: 91448

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-F19

CRN: 91685

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753