Sections

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GSFS0105A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0105A-F17

CRN: 92342

Victoria's Secrets
Please Register Via ENAM 0105
Victoria’s Secrets
Known as the great age of the realist novel and the epitome of staid decorum, the nineteenth century also had its guilty pleasures--mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, adventure tales, and more--all exposing a wild underside to the Victorian imagination where seeming norms of gendered, racial, and ethnic identity were systematically called into question. In this course we will read both canonical realist novels and their non-traditional counterparts in an attempt to understand the productive interplay between these two seemingly disparate literary traditions. Authors may include: Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, the Brontës, Wilkie Collins, R.L. Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, H.G. Wells, Bram Stoker, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and others. 3 hrs.lect.

GSFS0191A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0191A-F17

CRN: 91426

Gender and the Body
Gender and the Body
What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0200A-F17

CRN: 91427

Feminist Foundations
Feminist Foundations
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Focusing on the histories of feminism in the U.S., from the nineteenth century to the present, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which feminist movements have resisted these processes. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0205A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0205A-F17

CRN: 92565

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
Please register via WRPR 0205A
Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect

GSFS0207A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207A-F17

CRN: 92392

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207A
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0207B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0207B-F17

CRN: 92393

Economics and Gender
Please register via ECON 0207B
Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

GSFS0208A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0208A-F17

CRN: 92007

Black Womanhood/Pop. Culture
Please register via AMST 0208A
Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0220A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ARBC0220A-F17

CRN: 92182

Arab Women's Lit in Translat
Please Register Via ARBC 0220
Arab Women’s Literature in Translation
In this course, we will explore writings by Arab women and will closely examine the major theoretical and political issues in the translation of texts from Arabic to English. We will look in particular at the intersection of gender, politics, and the legacy of Orientalism, exploring translation and reception, gender and genre, and categories of knowledge production about Arab women. In addition to an introduction to the major theories of translation studies, we will also explore feminist and postcolonial theories and methodologies for studying and understanding contemporary Arab women’s literature. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0225A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0225A-F17

CRN: 92496

Feminist Blogging
Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0234A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0234A-F17

CRN: 92480

Philosophy & Feminism
Please register via PHIL 0234A
Philosophy and Feminism
This course will examine the contributions of various feminists and feminist philosophers to some of the central problems of philosophical methodology, epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics, and ethics. Are there gendered assumptions in operation in the way particular philosophical problems are framed? For example, do the politics of gender contribute to accounts of objective knowledge and rationality? Are some philosophical perspectives better suited to the goals of feminism than others? We will also examine the general relationship between feminism and philosophy, and we will reflect on the relevance of theorizing and philosophizing for feminist political practice.

GSFS0261A-F17

CRN: 92073

Globalizing Gender
Globalizing Gender
In this course we will explore gender and the process of gendering as a complex and evolving global phenomenon of the 21st century. The readings will focus on the politics and experience of gender and sexualities in various parts of the world, including India, Pakistan, Muslim minorities in South Asia, and among diasporic communities in Europe and the United States. Through lectures and small group discussions, we will critique and analyze themes including third gender, masculinity, changing practices of marriage, the politics of sexuality, and the impact of the women’s movement, and gay rights movement on existing understanding of gendered traditions. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0284A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0284A-F17

CRN: 92125

Modern Dance History in U.S.
Please register via DANC 0284A
Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations
In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen.

GSFS0302A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0302A-F17

CRN: 92406

Unquiet Minds:Gender & Madness
Please register via ENAM 0302A
Unquiet Minds: Gender and Madness in Literature and Medicine (I)
In this course we will explore the fascinating intersection of gender, literature, and medicine from the Greeks to the present day, focusing in particular on the early modern period. We will consider why and how such diseases as melancholy and hysteria became flashpoints for anxieties about gender and sexuality in this period, turning to both literary and medical narratives to illuminate the troubled interface between mind and body in the social construction of melancholic illness. Alongside literary texts that dramatize mental illness (such as Chrétien's Yvain and Shakespeare's Hamlet) we will read sections from Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy as well as the recently published account by a 17th century woman of her own private struggles with madness. We will conclude with a consideration of contemporary texts that explore the experience of madness, including Kay Redfield Jamison's memoir An Unquiet Mind and Sarah Ruhl's Melancholy Play. In this final section we will also explore the work being done in the exciting emerging field of "narrative medicine," which brings together literature and medicine in quite explicit and strategic ways.

GSFS0304A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0304A-F17

CRN: 92285

Gender, Culture, & Power
Please Register Via SOAN 0304
Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0307A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0307A-F17

CRN: 92078

Human Sexuality
Please register via PSYC 0307A
Human Sexuality
In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0329A-F17

CRN: 92142

Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect.

GSFS0376A-F17

CRN: 92033

Politics of Identity
Please register via SOAN 0376A
Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

GSFS0383A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0383A-F17

CRN: 92450

Storied Women
Please register via RELI 0383A
Storied Women
In this course we will read and analyze stories about women in the Jewish Bible, its Greek translations, and the New Testament, using various historical, literary, and gendered approaches to the study of ancient texts. Though student interests will help determine the final list of the characters we will consider, contenders include Eve, Hagar, Rebekah, Tamar, Deborah, Ruth, Judith, Mary, the women of Paul’s letters, and Revelation’s great whore of Babylon. In addition to recent academic treatments of the stories, we will also consider some of the ways they have been retold through time and in contemporary literature and film. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0384A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0384A-F17

CRN: 92077

Women, Religion, & Ethnography
Please register via RELI 0384A
Women, Religion, and Ethnography
In this course we will focus on ethnographic scholarship regarding women in various religious traditions. We will begin with questions of feminist ethnography as proposed by Lila Abu-Lughod and then read a range of ethnographies focusing on women in different contexts, including a female Muslim healer in South India, Kalasha women in Pakistan, Bedouin Muslim women in Egypt, and Catholic nuns in Mexico. We will focus on how gendered and religious identities are constructed and intertwined, and what ethnography contributes to the study of both religion and gender. A prior course in Religion, Anthropology, or Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies is recommended. 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0435A-F17

CRN: 92478

Feminist Engaged Research
Feminist Engaged Research
What is feminist engaged research? What are its methods? How does approaching research in a feminist manner influence the kinds of questions we can ask, as well as our potential answers? How has feminist research been useful to activists and how might it continue to be? How have feminists practicing engaged research centered race, place, class, and ability in their analyses of gender and sexuality? This feminist theory/methods hybrid course takes as a starting point these questions. We will think through what feminist engaged research means, develop strategies for conducting such research, and consider the relation of knowledge production to power, justice, and action. Students will grapple with how to apply course material to their own engaged research projects, with the two-fold goal of pushing the boundaries of academic thought and also producing scholarship that is useful beyond academia(GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem.

GSFS0438A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0438A-F17 HIST0438B-F17 GSFS0438B-F17

CRN: 92369

Woman & Islam
Please register via HIST 0438A
Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law; gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, and Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0438B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0438A-F17 HIST0438B-F17 GSFS0438A-F17

CRN: 92370

Woman & Islam
Please register via HIST 0438B
Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law; gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, and Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

GSFS0500A-F17

CRN: 91432

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500B-F17

CRN: 91433

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500C-F17

CRN: 91537

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0500D-F17

CRN: 92156

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

GSFS0700A-F17

CRN: 91434

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700B-F17

CRN: 91435

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700C-F17

CRN: 91531

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0700D-F17

CRN: 92157

Senior Essay
Senior Essay
(Approval required)

GSFS0710A-F17

CRN: 91436

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710B-F17

CRN: 91437

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710C-F17

CRN: 91538

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

GSFS0710D-F17

CRN: 92158

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Chellis House Women's Resource Center
56 Hillcrest Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753