Middlebury

 

Sections

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WAGS0114A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0114A-S12

CRN: 22239

Reading Women's Writing
Please register via ENAM 0114A

Reading Women's Writing
Why and how do women write? Does literary history reveal distinctive styles, patterns, and continuities in the works of female authors? We will begin to address these questions through our close reading of a wide variety of women's literature in English, including poetry, fiction, essays, and drama from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Secondary readings will reflect on the concept of gender as a central organizing principle. Employing various methods of literary analysis, the course will address issues of interest to students in a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, psychology, and history, as well as literature. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. disc.

WAGS0172A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0172A-S12

CRN: 22172

Writing Gender and Sexuality
Please register via ENAM 0172A

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

WAGS0200A-S12

CRN: 20569

Foundations in W & G Studies

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Examining gender always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on our gendered lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender as an analytical category to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0262A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0262A-S12

CRN: 22229

Mobile Women

Mobile Women: Transnational Work Patterns
The course examines women's work in the formal labor sectors to offer a critical perspective on contemporary local and global patterns. The materials will cover concerns that are central to women in the United States such as the glass ceiling, the wage gap, and the pink-collar ghetto. The course will also offer a transnational perspective through an analysis of the central role migrant female laborers have come to play in the global economy. This section will cover issues such as the traffic in domestic workers, nannies and sex workers. We will interrogate how feminist theories are able to accommodate the uneven development of women's rights at the global and local levels. Through a few case studies students will also be introduced to alternative work patterns established by groups such as the greenbelt movement in Kenya and SEWA in India. 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0314A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S12 SOAN0314B-S12 WAGS0314B-S12

CRN: 21740

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314A

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191)

WAGS0314B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S12 WAGS0314A-S12 SOAN0314B-S12

CRN: 21770

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314B

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191)

WAGS0317A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0317A-S12

CRN: 22294

Transgender Hist Ident Pol

Transgender Histories, Identities, and Politics
In this course, we will critically investigate the historical, political, social, and cultural conditions and contexts that have enabled the category "transgender" to emerge into its contemporary use by exploring topics such as: historical shifts in the medicalization and pathologization of gender and sexual deviance; differing and competing constructions of "sex" and "gender" in academia, feminist critiques of transexual identities and technologies, and the controversies and challenges surrounding transgender rights. We will examine these topics through a wide range of readings alongside a weekly documentary film screening. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WAGS0320A-S12

CRN: 21846

Topics in Feminist Theory

Romance, Desire, Sex: Selected Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. How have feminist theories addressed the issues of romance, desire and sex? Working within a transnational perspective, course materials will examine: (1) how the concepts of choice, freedom, and agency translate in different cultures; (2) the concept of gender identity and the viability of the category woman in different locales; and (3) the political economy of romance, desire, and pleasure . In each section the readings will locate feminist theories in relation to histories of colonialism and postcolonialism, as well as theories of nationalism and globalization. (WAGS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

WAGS0375A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0375A-S12

CRN: 22106

Social Control/Problem Youth
Please register via SOAN 0375A

Bad Boys and Wayward Girls: The Social Control of “Problem Youth”
Everyone worries about young people; we scrutinize their clothes, music, friends, grades, drugs, and sports. Families, schools, medicine, and psychology communicate what it means to be a "normal" young person. Reformatories and other disciplinary mechanisms convey the consequences for rule breaking. In this course, we will (1) look at the construction of childhood, the invention of delinquency, the creation of adolescence, and the ideas of normalcy embedded in these categories; (2) consider how class, race, and gender intersect with the mechanisms of social control exerted over those who deviate; and (3) explore how young people resist the social pressures to be good boys and docile girls. (Formerly SOAN 0475) (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0288) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WAGS0390A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0390A-S12

CRN: 22200

Seminar in Religious Ethics
Please register via RELI 0390A

Seminar in Religious Ethics: Black Women’s Voices of Liberation
Standing at the intersection of racial and gender discrimination, African American women have engaged structures of oppression from a distinct perspective. This course explores the origins and development of womanist and black feminist thought, beginning with abolitionists like Maria Stewart and Sojourner Truth, and extending to calls for justice during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights eras. We will also consider the continuing struggle for liberation in the work of contemporary black feminist ethics. We will examine the religious impulses that inform African American women’s responses to marginalization and consider how the study of black feminism informs our understanding of women and race in contemporary American society. 3 hrs. sem.

WAGS0438A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0438A-S12

CRN: 22240

Women and Islam
Please register via HIST 0438A

Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, an Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

WAGS0441A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0441A-S12

CRN: 22178

Literature and Seduction
Please register via ENAM 0441A

Literature and Seduction
This course will look at works of erotic and emotional persuasion: some represent seductions, some (love poems and love letters) are intended as persuasive documents themselves, while others (some first person narratives) are arguably designed to seduce the reader. As we explore material from antiquity through the 21st century, we will examine the ways in which the idea of seduction has (or has not) changed, and what cultural conceptions of seduction say about ideologies of gender, subjectivity, sexuality, and literary representation. Texts will include works by Ovid, Plutarch, Keats, Wilde, Bronte, Nabokov, Rostand, Laclos, Wittig, and others; numerous historical documents and theoretical texts; and contemporary treatments of the subject from Nora Roberts to Cosmo to Neil Strauss. (This course satisfies the ENAM seminar requirement; this course meets the major requirement for WAGS 0400 for 2011-2012 only). Sem.

WAGS0443A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0443A-S12

CRN: 22235

Readings in African History
Please register via HIST 0443A

Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar

WAGS0500A-S12

CRN: 20268

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500B-S12

CRN: 20765

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500C-S12

CRN: 21119

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500D-S12

CRN: 21199

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700A-S12

CRN: 20269

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700B-S12

CRN: 20665

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700C-S12

CRN: 21120

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700D-S12

CRN: 22403

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700E-S12

CRN: 22547

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700F-S12

CRN: 22548

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710A-S12

CRN: 20270

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710B-S12

CRN: 20826

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710C-S12

CRN: 21396

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710D-S12

CRN: 21395

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)