Middlebury

 

Sections

« Winter 2013 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 »

WAGS0191A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0191A-S13

CRN: 22294

Intro to Sociology of Gender
Please register via SOAN 0191A

Introduction to Sociology of Gender
What is gender and what would a sociology of it look like? When did gender become a category of inquiry and more importantly why? We will look at how the meaning and performance of gender changed over time, from Classical Greece to Victorian England, to the contemporary U.S. We will also look at how gender changes depending on one’s position in social space, e.g. one’s race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, we will consider how the need to look at gender is the result of a variety of discourses, from psychoanalysis to capitalism to movements of liberation such as feminism. 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0200A-S13

CRN: 20558

Foundations in W & G Studies

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Examining gender always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on our gendered lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender as an analytical category to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0201A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0201A-S13

CRN: 22214

Writing for Social Change
Please register via WRPR 0201A

Writing for Social Change
This course explores the many choices we face as speakers and writers when communicating across race, gender, sexuality, religion, culture, class and ability. Drawing on works by W. E. B. Dubois, James Baldwin, Beverly Tatum, Paulo Freire, Dorothy Allison, Arundhati Roy, Amy Tan, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Desmund Tutu, and others, the class explores a range of genres and voices and examines patterns of domination and subordination in diverse cultural contexts. Students will learn strategies for both creative and critical writing and respond to formal and informal writing assignments. The class will hold occasional writing workshops, and final projects will provide opportunities for collaboration.

WAGS0223A-S13

CRN: 22295

Intro to Gay/Lesbian Studies

Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies
This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen

WAGS0256A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0256A-S13

CRN: 22440

British Crime Drama
Please register via FMMC 0256A

British Crime Drama
What makes British crime drama different from its American counterpart? Using gender, race, and sexuality as the primary lens, students will tease out the signature features of the British television genre. Through an examination of historical and contemporary shows, students will discern how cultural differences and Britain’s specific histories of empire and colonialism inflect the crime stories that are told. In particular we will use the crime drama to understand Britain’s encounter with modernity and how this is reflected in aesthetic choices.

WAGS0283A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0283A-S13

CRN: 22297

Social Dance & Popular Culture
Please Register via DANC 0283A

From George Washington to John Travolta: Social Dance in Popular Culture
In this course we will examine religion, gender, morality, etiquette, politics, and other cultural and societal issues in American history as they intersect in the public sphere through the activity of social dance. Coursework will involve the investigation of primary source materials including contemporary letters and diaries, dance manuals, newspaper and journal reports, and accounts of social dance in American literature. Students will read texts on dance and cultural history, view images of dance in American art and popular film, and listen to four centuries of American dance music. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screening

WAGS0285A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S13 DANC0285B-S13 WAGS0285B-S13

CRN: 22447

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285A

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

WAGS0285B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285A-S13 WAGS0285A-S13 DANC0285B-S13

CRN: 22516

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285B

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

WAGS0285Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0285Z-S13

CRN: 22518

Ethics/Aesthetics/Body
Please register via DANC 0285Z

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab

WAGS0302A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0302A-S13

CRN: 22334

Unquiet Minds:Gender & Madness
Please register via ENAM 0302A

Unquiet Minds: Gender and Madness in Literature and Medicine
In this course we will explore the fascinating intersection of gender, literature, and medicine from the Greeks to the present day, focusing in particular on the early modern period. We will consider why and how such diseases as melancholy and hysteria became flashpoints for anxieties about gender and sexuality in this period, turning to both literary and medical narratives to illuminate the troubled interface between mind and body in the social construction of melancholic illness. Alongside literary texts that dramatize mental illness (such as Chrétien's Yvain and Shakespeare's Hamlet) we will read sections from Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy as well as the recently published account by a 17th century woman of her own private struggles with madness. We will conclude with a consideration of contemporary texts that explore the experience of madness, including Kay Redfield Jamison's memoir An Unquiet Mind and Sarah Ruhl's Melancholy Play. In this final section we will also explore the work being done in the exciting emerging field of "narrative medicine," which brings together literature and medicine in quite explicit and strategic ways.

WAGS0307A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
PSYC0307A-S13

CRN: 22199

Human Sexuality
Please register via PSYC 0307A

Human Sexuality
This course will provide an introduction to the biological, psychosocial, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality. Specifically, the course will cover topics such as the physiology of sexual response, love and the development of sexual relationships, sexual orientation, contraceptive use, and sexually transmitted diseases. Emphasis will be given to discussion of relevant social issues, including sexual harassment, pornography, and cyberspace sexuality. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate the sexual norms, attitudes, and practices of their own and other cultures. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and WAGS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0314A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S13 SOAN0314B-S13 WAGS0314B-S13

CRN: 21509

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314A

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0314B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S13 WAGS0314A-S13 SOAN0314B-S13

CRN: 21517

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Please register via SOAN 0314B

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

WAGS0320A-S13

CRN: 21528

Topics in Feminist Theory

Topics in Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. How have feminist theories addressed the issues of romance, desire and sex? Working within a transnational perspective, course materials will examine: (1) how the concepts of choice, freedom, and agency translate in different cultures; (2) the concept of gender identity and the viability of the category woman in different locales; and (3) the political economy of romance, desire, and pleasure . In each section the readings will locate feminist theories in relation to histories of colonialism and postcolonialism, as well as theories of nationalism and globalization. (WAGS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect.

WAGS0341A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0341A-S13

CRN: 22353

Gender Sexuality S. Asian Rel
Please register via RELI 0341A

Gender and Sexuality in South Asian Religions
In this course we will focus on historical and ethnographic scholarship on Hinduism and Islam in South Asia. We will initially draw on the theories of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and third world feminists to examine issues of gender and sexuality. Then we will examine a range of case studies—including colonial interpretations of the Hindu practices of sati, the experiences of devadasis in Telugu south India, an account of a female Muslim healer in Hyderabad, and the religious practices of third-gendered hijras—to address how gender and sexuality are constructed in the religious landscape of South Asian Hinduism and Islam. Prior study of religion or women’s and gender studies is required. 3 hrs. sem.

WAGS0358A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0358A-S13

CRN: 22422

Theories of Spectatorship
Please register via FMMC 0358A

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

WAGS0393A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0393A-S13

CRN: 22256

Gender in Early America
Please register via HIST 0393A

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WAGS0413A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0413A-S13

CRN: 22420

White People
Please register via SOAN 0413A

White People
White people are often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will begin by considering the formation of whiteness in post Civil War America. We will read histories of whiteness, such as Grace Elizabeth Hale's Making Whiteness, as well as consider important milestones in whiteness, from the films Birth of a Nation and Gone With The Wind to the blog "What White People Like." Finally we will use essays, blogs, photographs, and videos to make white people at Middlebury visible by documenting how they represent themselves through language, dress, and rituals. (This course is open to junior and senior SOAN majors only; not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) 3 hrs. sem.

WAGS0444A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0444A-S13

CRN: 22455

Sex, Violence, and Culture
Please register via SPAN 0444A

Sex, Violence, and Culture
In this course we will critically investigate the historical and contemporary manifestations of sexual violence within their cultural, biological, and individual expressions. We will also examine how gender--as a powerful category that shapes the way we see others and others see us-can be used to create a context for the justification of gender-based violence. Discussion and analysis of a wide variety of materials, including literary texts, essays, films, music, and videos, will form the basis of our exploration of the representation of sexual violence in Hispanic literature. Readings will include literary texts by authors Antonio Muñoz Molina, Roberto Bolaño, and Juan Bonilla, as well as theoretical texts by Fausto-Sterling, Katz, Brownmiller, Jensen, and O'Toole. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

WAGS0500A-S13

CRN: 20261

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500B-S13

CRN: 20749

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500C-S13

CRN: 21098

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0500D-S13

CRN: 21173

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700A-S13

CRN: 20262

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0700B-S13

CRN: 20654

Senior Essay

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710A-S13

CRN: 20263

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710B-S13

CRN: 20807

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710C-S13

CRN: 21338

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

WAGS0710D-S13

CRN: 21337

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)