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HIST0105A-S12

CRN: 22006

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0105X-S12

CRN: 22007

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0105Y-S12

CRN: 22008

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0105Z-S12

CRN: 22009

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0107A-S12

CRN: 22024

Modern Latin America

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0107Y-S12

CRN: 22339

Modern Latin America
Discussion

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0107Z-S12

CRN: 22340

Modern Latin America
Discussion

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

HIST0112A-S12

CRN: 21487

Modern East Asia

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0232 or HIST 0236. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0112X-S12

CRN: 21489

Modern East Asia
Discussion

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0232 or HIST 0236. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0112Y-S12

CRN: 21490

Modern East Asia
Discussion

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0232 or HIST 0236. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0112Z-S12

CRN: 21491

Modern East Asia
Discussion

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0232 or HIST 0236. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0206A-S12

CRN: 22010

The United States & the World

The United States and the World Since 1898
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect, 1 hr. disc.

HIST0206X-S12

CRN: 22011

The United States & the World
Discussion

The United States and the World Since 1898
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect, 1 hr. disc.

HIST0206Y-S12

CRN: 22012

The United States & the World
Discussion

The United States and the World Since 1898
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect, 1 hr. disc.

HIST0206Z-S12

CRN: 22013

The United States & the World
Discussion

The United States and the World Since 1898
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect, 1 hr. disc.

HIST0216A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0216A-S12

CRN: 22026

Hist of American West

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0231A-S12

CRN: 22003

Imperial China

Imperial China
The history of China, from her cultural beginnings to the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Special attention will be directed toward the social, institutional, and intellectual processes, such as dynastic succession and bureaucratic centralization that were key constituents in shaping China's traditional period of development. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0236A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236A-S12

CRN: 22014

History of Modern Japan

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Y-S12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Y-S12

CRN: 22016

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Z-S12

CRN: 22017

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0243A-S12

CRN: 22020

Mediterranean World, 400-1600

The Mediterranean World, 400-1600
The Mediterranean has long been a crossroads between East and West and North and South, a meeting point of the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Southern Europe. Merchants and armies have plied the seaways carrying with them their religions and cultures. The pre-modern Mediterranean offered an exhilarating but, at times uncomfortable, mix of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Starting from Fernand Braudel's conceit, we will consider the Mediterranean itself as an important character in the narrative of history. We will study the geography of the Mediterranean as well as its religious, economic, environmental, and cultural history with a view to bringing together different understandings of Mare Nostrum (our sea). Pre-1800. 2 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0248A-S12

CRN: 20635

Modern Russia

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Y-S12

CRN: 20645

Modern Russia
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Z-S12

CRN: 20646

Modern Russia
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0249A-S12

CRN: 22021

Germany in the 19th Century

Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century
This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0253A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0253B-S12

CRN: 22022

British History: 1603-1815

British History: 1603-1815
The medieval pattern of English society disintegrated in the seventeenth century. The unity of the English Church, the relationship between Crown and Parliament, even the social hierarchy, were threatened by new developments. After generations of civil war, revolution, and party strife, the eighteenth century saw the establishment of an oligarchic but more flexible order, able to withstand the challenges of radicalism and the American and French revolutions. By 1815 Britain, at the peak of its power in Europe, was already beginning to experience tensions of industrialism. This course will concentrate on the religious, social, and political aspects of these transformations. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0253B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0253A-S12

CRN: 22420

British History: 1603-1815

British History: 1603-1815
The medieval pattern of English society disintegrated in the seventeenth century. The unity of the English Church, the relationship between Crown and Parliament, even the social hierarchy, were threatened by new developments. After generations of civil war, revolution, and party strife, the eighteenth century saw the establishment of an oligarchic but more flexible order, able to withstand the challenges of radicalism and the American and French revolutions. By 1815 Britain, at the peak of its power in Europe, was already beginning to experience tensions of industrialism. This course will concentrate on the religious, social, and political aspects of these transformations. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0257A-S12

CRN: 22218

The Holocaust

The Holocaust
Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0266A-S12

CRN: 22023

Egypt Iran & Turkey: Mdrn Hist

Egypt, Iran, and Turkey: Alternative Modernizations
The Middle East's struggles with modernization are encapsulated in the history of its three most populous nation-states: Egypt, Iran, and Turkey. The rise of nationalism, European incursions in the Middle East, and internal strife contributed to the gradual fall of the Ottoman and Qajar Empires in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. From the rubble emerged distinct social, political, economic, and religious responses to modernization, ranging from the establishment of a secular, ultra-nationalist state in Turkey, Arab nationalism in Egypt, monarchism and Islamism in Iran. We will explore and compare these three experiences using an array of sources including primary documents, works of fiction, and film. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0305A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0305A-S12

CRN: 22004

Confucius and Confucianism

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0322A-S12

CRN: 22209

History of Latinos in the U.S.

History of Latinos in the United States
In this course we will explore the historical experiences of the peoples from Latin America in the United States. We will trace these experiences from their roots prior to the 19th century through to the present. Within this population, we will consider the diversity of experiences along religious, ethnic, and racial lines. We will study the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of both large communities of Mexican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican immigrants and smaller communities of Dominican and Brazilian immigrants. We will also compare the experiences of other minority groups in the Unites States, such as African Americans, and with similar groups in Europe.

HIST0327A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327A-S12 SOAN0327B-S12 HIST0327B-S12

CRN: 22245

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest
Please register via SOAN 0327A

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0327B-S12

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0327A-S12 SOAN0327B-S12 HIST0327A-S12

CRN: 22302

Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest
Please register via SOAN 0327B

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0369A-S12

CRN: 22187

East India Company

The East India Company
In this course you will be introduced to the English East India Company, from the 17th-century until its dissolution in 1858. Much of our focus will be on the Company’s presence in India, and we will pay particular attention to its transformation from a maritime trading company into a territorial colonial state. We will read a number of controversial texts from the period, immerse ourselves in the worlds of Company and Indian politics, and do guided research using holdings in Middlebury’s Special Collections. Topics will include the rise of the Company as a trading concern, its aggressive competition with other European trading monopolies and South Asian kingdoms, and the importance of opium in its dealings with China. We will end with a discussion of the Indian rebellion of 1857. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1308 or HIST 1009)

HIST0375A-S12

CRN: 22185

Struggles in Southern Africa

Struggles for Change in Southern Africa
In this course we will examine the tumultuous period of social struggle in southern Africa in the decades following World War II. Major topics to be covered include the rise of apartheid and the mobilization of anti-apartheid resistance in South Africa and Namibia; the liberation struggle against white settler rule in Zimbabwe; the fight for freedom from Portuguese colonialism in Mozambique; and Mozambique's protracted civil war following independence. A central purpose of this course is to explore how these different arenas of struggle transformed individual lives and social relations in complex and diverse ways, generating enduring impacts and challenges within the region.

HIST0391A-S12

CRN: 22028

Native American / Imagination

Native Americans in the American Imagination
In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will examine the changing image of Native Americans in American popular culture from 1800-2000. Through novels, plays, films, photography, advertisements, amusements, sport-team mascots, and museum displays, we will trace and analyze how the American Indian has been defined, appropriated, and represented popularly to Americans from the early republic to the turn of the twenty-first century. We will consider how American popular culture has used over time the image of the American Indian to symbolize national concerns and to forge a national American identity. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0397A-S12

CRN: 22029

America and the Pacific

America and the Pacific
If the 20th century was "America's Century," then it could also be deemed "America's Pacific Century" as interaction with Asia fundamentally shaped the United States' political, social, and diplomatic development. In this course we will examine American foreign relations on the Pacific Rim from the Philippine-American War to the Los Angeles riots of 1992. Topics to be covered include: America's imperial project in Asia, the annexation of Hawaii, Wilsonian diplomacy, the reconstruction of Japan after World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Richard Nixon's visit to Communist China, and the immigrant experience. 3 hrs sem.

HIST0410A-S12

CRN: 22210

Rdgs in Soviet History
New Man: RU/Soviet Imagination

Readings in Soviet History: The "New Man" in the Russian and Soviet Imagination
In this seminar we will examine that superman of modernity who inspired and terrified a century of Russian philosophers, artists, and revolutionaries: the New Man. We will explore the emergence and development of this ideal type between the 1840s and the 1940s. We will trace how radical socialists and religious conservatives constantly re-conceptualized him, and we will study Soviet attempts to transform its citizens into New Men and Women through Marxism-Leninism. Readings will include many of Russia's greatest philosophical and literary works of the period.

HIST0417A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0417A-S12

CRN: 22345

Modern Am Indian Social Hist

Modern American Indian Social History
Popular narratives of American Indian history often conclude with the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre and fail to acknowledge the endurance and resurgence of modern Indian nations. In this readings seminar, we will examine Native life and the processes of accommodation, resistance, renewal, and change from the reservation era to the present. Course topics will include: treaty rights and tribal sovereignty, federal Indian policy, pan-Indian movements, reservation governance and economic development, cultural revitalization, conflict over natural resources, identity politics, and urban experiences. We will also reflect upon the various interdisciplinary sources and interdisciplinary methods of American Indian studies. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0436A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0436A-S12

CRN: 22034

Rdings in Japanese History
Modernism & Fascism in Japan

Readings in Japanese History: Modernism and Fascism between the World Wars
The 1920s in Japan is typically understood as a period of political and cultural experimentation, as witnessed by the rise of avant-garde cultural groups and radicalized social movements. In contrast, the 1930s is portrayed as Japan's "dark valley", in which this sense of experimentation was suppressed or co-opted by the state. In this course, we will revisit these tumultuous decades by engaging with a range of historical assessments, novels, and critical essays. We will begin by examining theories of modernism and fascism, and then explore the changing socio-cultural milieu in interwar Japan, including mass-culture, modernization, romanticism, imperialism, and utopianism. (formerly HIST 0418)

HIST0438A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
WAGS0438A-S12

CRN: 22033

Women and Islam

Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, an Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0443A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
WAGS0443A-S12

CRN: 22035

Readings in African History

Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar

HIST0472A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0472A-S12 RELI0472A-S12

CRN: 22236

Buddhist/Christian Monasticism
Please register via INTL 0472A

“The Religious Life”: Buddhist and Christian Monastic Traditions Compared*
Both Buddhism and Christianity include traditions of monasticism, of men and women leaving home for “the religious life.” In this course, we will study and compare Buddhist and Christian monasticism from historical and religious perspectives. We will read primary sources, from the Life of St. Anthony and the Rule of St. Benedict to the verses attributed to the first Buddhist nuns and a Zen monastic code. We will examine monastic vocation, the integration of monasteries into society, and the adaptation of monasticism to different cultures. Throughout, we will highlight the role of gender. We will conclude with attention to contemporary manifestations of monastic culture. This course is equivalent to INTL 0472 and RELI 0472. 3 hr sem.

HIST0475A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0475A-S12

CRN: 22129

Imperial/Anti-Imperial Asia
Please register via INTL 0475A

Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Asia
In this seminar we will examine patterns of Euro-American and Japanese imperialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the ways in which scholars and revolutionaries have made sense of the workings of colonial power and formulated strategies for resistance. By engaging with novels, films, and political manifestos, students will gain a broad understanding of how imperialism transformed lifeworlds, how its cultural, social, and economic dimensions have been critiqued, and the formation of nationalist, Marxist, and Pan-Asianist movements. Readings will include works by V.I. Lenin , Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and Ranajit Guha. This course is equivalent to INTL 0475. 3 hrs seminar.

HIST0500A-S12

CRN: 20352

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0700A-S12

CRN: 20353

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.