Middlebury

 

Sections

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HIST0108A-F12

CRN: 92632

Early Islam and Middle East

The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0108X-F12

CRN: 92633

Early Islam and Middle East
Discussion

The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0108Y-F12

CRN: 92634

Early Islam and Middle East
Discussion

The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0108Z-F12

CRN: 92635

Early Islam and Middle East
Discussion

The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0112A-F12

CRN: 92636

Modern East Asia

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0112Y-F12

CRN: 92637

Modern East Asia
Discussion

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0112Z-F12

CRN: 92638

Modern East Asia
Discussion

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0113A-F12

CRN: 92639

History of Africa to 1800

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0113X-F12

CRN: 92640

History of Africa to 1800
Discussion

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0113Y-F12

CRN: 92641

History of Africa to 1800
Discussion

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0131A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0131A-F12

CRN: 92950

Archaic and Classical Greece
Please Register via CLAS 0131A

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0131Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0131Y-F12

CRN: 92953

Archaic and Classical Greece
Please register via CLAS 0131Y

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0131Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0131Z-F12

CRN: 92954

Archaic and Classical Greece
Please register via CLAS 0131Z

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0203A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0203B-F12

CRN: 91689

US History 1492-1861

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0203B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0203A-F12

CRN: 92643

US History 1492-1861

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0203X-F12

CRN: 92793

US History 1492-1861
Discussion

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0203Y-F12

CRN: 91867

US History 1492-1861
Discussion

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0203Z-F12

CRN: 91868

US History 1492-1861
Discussion-CW

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0212A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0212B-F12

CRN: 92644

Civil War and Reconstruction

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0212B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0212A-F12

CRN: 92645

Civil War and Reconstruction

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0212X-F12

CRN: 92646

Civil War and Reconstruction
Discussion

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0212Y-F12

CRN: 92647

Civil War and Reconstruction
Discussion

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0212Z-F12

CRN: 92648

Civil War and Reconstruction
Discussion-CW

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0220A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0220A-F12

CRN: 91830

American Economic History
Please register via ECON 0220A

American Economic History since 1900
This course will provide an overview of the major themes in the growth and development of the modern American economy. Topics will include the economic history of railroads, automobiles, foreign trade, banks and financial markets. We will also examine the role of the courts and government policy in American economic development, with special emphasis on the rise and decline of Laissez-Faire as the dominant mode of economic regulation in the nation's labor and financial markets. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

HIST0222A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0222B-F12

CRN: 92649

Intro To Environmental History

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIST0222B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0222A-F12

CRN: 92650

Intro To Environmental History

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIST0222X-F12

CRN: 92651

Intro To Environmental History
Discussion

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIST0222Y-F12

CRN: 92652

Intro To Environmental History
Discussion

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIST0222Z-F12

CRN: 92653

Intro To Environmental History
Discussion-CW

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIST0228A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170A-F12

CRN: 91686

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170A

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0228Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170Y-F12

CRN: 91687

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170Y

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0228Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170Z-F12

CRN: 91688

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170Z

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0231A-F12

CRN: 92654

Imperial China

Imperial China
The history of China, from her cultural beginnings to the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Special attention will be directed toward the social, institutional, and intellectual processes, such as dynastic succession and bureaucratic centralization that were key constituents in shaping China's traditional period of development. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0236A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236A-F12

CRN: 92655

History of Modern Japan

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Y-F12

CRN: 92656

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Z-F12

CRN: 92657

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0237A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0237A-F12

CRN: 91696

Chinese Philosophy

Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0240A-F12

CRN: 92658

History of Pakistan

History of Pakistan
This course is a political and cultural history of Pakistan. Topics to be discussed include: the pre-independence demand for Pakistan; the partitioning of India in 1947; literary and cultural traditions; the power of the army in politics; the civil war that created Bangladesh; the wars with India; the wars in Afghanistan; the rise of Islamist parties and militant groups; the significance of the Taliban and al Qaeda; and Pakistan's relations with the US, China and India. Readings will include histories, autobiographies, novels, and newspaper and magazine accounts. Several documentary films will also be shown. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0246A-F12

CRN: 92662

Modern Europe, 1900-1989

History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989
Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

HIST0246X-F12

CRN: 92663

Modern Europe, 1900-1989
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989
Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

HIST0246Y-F12

CRN: 92664

Modern Europe, 1900-1989
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989
Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

HIST0246Z-F12

CRN: 92665

Modern Europe, 1900-1989
Discussion

History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989
Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

HIST0248A-F12

CRN: 92666

History of the Soviet Union

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Y-F12

CRN: 92668

History of the Soviet Union
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Z-F12

CRN: 92669

History of the Soviet Union
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0262A-F12

CRN: 92670

History of Modern Middle East

History of the Modern Middle East
This course investigates the history of social and political change in the Middle East from 1798 to the present. Within a general political framework, the course will cover the main social, economic, and intellectual currents. Emphasizing political, economic, social and cultural history, the course seeks to examine the impact of outside powers on the region, the responses of the region's peoples to this challenge, colonization, nationalism and identity, religious and ideological trends, gender issues, major "crises" (including the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, and the Iranian Revolution), and efforts to reassert Islamic identity in an era of globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0288A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0288B-F12

CRN: 92671

Modern Brazil

Modern Brazil
Brazil is the Portuguese-speaking power of Latin America. In this course we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day, and discuss the contemporary developments that have transformed Brazil into an international force today. We will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history during the empire, the first republic, the Vargas era, and the military dictatorship. We will conclude with a look at Brazil's representative democracy from the 1980s to the present. (Formerly HIST 0211) 3 hr. lect.

HIST0288B-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0288A-F12

CRN: 92672

Modern Brazil

Modern Brazil
Brazil is the Portuguese-speaking power of Latin America. In this course we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day, and discuss the contemporary developments that have transformed Brazil into an international force today. We will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history during the empire, the first republic, the Vargas era, and the military dictatorship. We will conclude with a look at Brazil's representative democracy from the 1980s to the present. (Formerly HIST 0211) 3 hr. lect.

HIST0406A-F12

CRN: 92674

Rdgs Modern European History

Readings in Modern European History: Enlightenment, Revolution, and Terror*
The French Revolution provided a model for democratic political reform throughout the world, spreading new ideas about equality, national identity, and rights for minorities. Although informed by the Enlightenment and progressive social thought, it led to the Terror, a period of violence and repression in the name of revolutionary change. We will examine this attempt to create a just society and the corresponding violence against internal and external enemies. We will also consider the Revolution’s origins, the events in France, the shock tremors throughout the world, and the long-term repercussions of change. (formerly HIST 0401) 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0441A-F12

CRN: 92675

Rdgs African HI: Environmental

Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
This seminar will explore the history of human-environmental interaction on the African continent. The course examines how scholars have begun unraveling dominant historical understandings of African landscapes, cultures, and pre-colonial ecologies. A major portion of the course looks at how colonial relations shaped conflicts over environmental control and ecological change and the legacies of such dynamics in the postcolonial era. Readings on gender relations, urban environmental change, and the evolution of development thinking will be the focus of class discussions on new ways of interpreting African social and environmental change. (formerly HIST 0419) 3 hr. sem.

HIST0480A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0480A-F12

CRN: 92456

Globalization/Hist Perspective
Please register via INTL 0480A

Globalization in Historical Perspective
In this course, we will examine dynamics of colonial and capital expansion that have reshaped the globe since the 1700s. We will read classical social theorists, contemporary scholars, and novelists to discern ways in which human life around the world has been intertwined and differentiated. We will consider the formation of categories such as "West" and "East," the racialized and gendered ways in which colonizers have distinguished themselves from the colonized, and strategies by which these boundaries and hierarchies have been challenged. Students will gain a broad understanding of modern world history and a critical framework for evaluating imperialism. This course is equivalent to IGST 0480.

HIST0500A-F12

CRN: 90590

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500B-F12

CRN: 90967

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500C-F12

CRN: 90968

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500D-F12

CRN: 90969

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500G-F12

CRN: 90972

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500H-F12

CRN: 90983

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500K-F12

CRN: 91076

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500P-F12

CRN: 91080

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500S-F12

CRN: 91083

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500T-F12

CRN: 91084

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500U-F12

CRN: 91085

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0600A-F12

CRN: 91359

History Research Seminar

History Research Seminar
All history majors who have not taken a writing and research seminar are required to take HIST 0600 in their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course, students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material to the degree possible. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors. HIST 0600 is also open to International Studies and Environmental Studies majors with a disciplinary focus in history. 3 hr. sem

HIST0700A-F12

CRN: 90591

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700B-F12

CRN: 90810

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700C-F12

CRN: 90811

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700D-F12

CRN: 90812

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700E-F12

CRN: 90813

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700F-F12

CRN: 90814

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700H-F12

CRN: 90816

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700K-F12

CRN: 90819

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700N-F12

CRN: 90822

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700P-F12

CRN: 90940

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700Q-F12

CRN: 90941

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700R-F12

CRN: 90985

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700S-F12

CRN: 90984

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700T-F12

CRN: 91087

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700U-F12

CRN: 91088

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.