Middlebury

 

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HIST0103A-F13

CRN: 92268

The Making Of Europe

The Making of Europe
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0103X-F13

CRN: 92269

The Making Of Europe
Discussion

The Making of Europe
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0103Y-F13

CRN: 92270

The Making Of Europe
Discussion

The Making of Europe
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0103Z-F13

CRN: 92271

The Making Of Europe
Discussion

The Making of Europe
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0105A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0105B-F13

CRN: 92272

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0105B-F13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0105A-F13

CRN: 92273

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0105X-F13

CRN: 92274

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion-CW

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0105Y-F13

CRN: 92275

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0105Z-F13

CRN: 92276

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Discussion

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0106A-F13

CRN: 92559

Colonial Latin America

Colonial Latin America
In this course we will examine the formation of Latin American societies from 1492 to 1800, with emphasis on the contact of indigenous, European, and African civilizations; the conditions that facilitated European conquest; life in the colonial societies; and the political, economic, and philosophical changes that led to the independence movements of the 19th century. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0285)

HIST0109A-F13

CRN: 92277

Islam & Mid. East Since 1453

History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
This course is an introduction to the major institutions that evolved under the aegis of what we might call Islamic civilization since the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Major topics include the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, Western intervention and colonialism, nationalism and state formation, and the challenges of and responses to modernization. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0109Y-F13

CRN: 92278

Islam & Mid. East Since 1453
Discussion

History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
This course is an introduction to the major institutions that evolved under the aegis of what we might call Islamic civilization since the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Major topics include the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, Western intervention and colonialism, nationalism and state formation, and the challenges of and responses to modernization. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0109Z-F13

CRN: 92279

Islam & Mid. East Since 1453
Discussion

History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
This course is an introduction to the major institutions that evolved under the aegis of what we might call Islamic civilization since the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Major topics include the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, Western intervention and colonialism, nationalism and state formation, and the challenges of and responses to modernization. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0132A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0132A-F13

CRN: 92280

History Of Rome
Please register via CLAS 0132A

History of Rome
This course will study Roman history from its origins to Constantine. Particular emphasis will be on the unique characteristics of Roman society, the rise and influence of imperialism, the transition from Republic to Empire, the role of Rome as a Mediterranean power, and the emergence of Christianity. Readings will focus on the ancient sources, all in translation; authors include Polybius, Plutarch, Tacitus, and Eusebius. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0132Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0132Y-F13

CRN: 92282

History Of Rome
Please register via CLAS 0132Y

History of Rome
This course will study Roman history from its origins to Constantine. Particular emphasis will be on the unique characteristics of Roman society, the rise and influence of imperialism, the transition from Republic to Empire, the role of Rome as a Mediterranean power, and the emergence of Christianity. Readings will focus on the ancient sources, all in translation; authors include Polybius, Plutarch, Tacitus, and Eusebius. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0132Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0132Z-F13

CRN: 92283

History Of Rome
Please register via CLAS 0132Z

History of Rome
This course will study Roman history from its origins to Constantine. Particular emphasis will be on the unique characteristics of Roman society, the rise and influence of imperialism, the transition from Republic to Empire, the role of Rome as a Mediterranean power, and the emergence of Christianity. Readings will focus on the ancient sources, all in translation; authors include Polybius, Plutarch, Tacitus, and Eusebius. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIST0175A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0175A-F13

CRN: 92599

Immigrant America
Please register via AMST 0175A

Immigrant America
In this course we will trace American immigration history from the late 19th to the turn of the 21st century, and examine the essential place immigration has occupied in the making of modern America and American culture. The central themes of this course will be industrialization and labor migrations, aftermaths of wars and refugees, constructions of racial categories and ethnic community identities, legal defining of "aliens" and citizenship, and diversity in immigrant experiences. To explore these themes, we will engage a range of sources including memoirs, novels, oral histories, and films.

HIST0202A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0202A-F13

CRN: 92204

The American Mind

The American Mind
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Reinhold Niebuhr and Betty Friedan. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426)

HIST0228A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170A-F13

CRN: 91475

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170A

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0228Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170Y-F13

CRN: 91476

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170Y

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0228Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0170Z-F13

CRN: 91477

Religion in America
Please register via RELI 0170Z

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0236A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236A-F13

CRN: 91778

History of Modern Japan

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Y-F13

CRN: 91779

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0236Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0236Z-F13

CRN: 91780

History of Modern Japan
Discussion

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0237A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0237A-F13

CRN: 91479

Chinese Philosophy

Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0240A-F13

CRN: 91781

History of Pakistan

History of Pakistan
This course is a political and cultural history of Pakistan. Topics to be discussed include: the pre-independence demand for Pakistan; the partitioning of India in 1947; literary and cultural traditions; the power of the army in politics; the civil war that created Bangladesh; the wars with India; the wars in Afghanistan; the rise of Islamist parties and militant groups; the significance of the Taliban and al Qaeda; and Pakistan's relations with the US, China and India. Readings will include histories, autobiographies, novels, and newspaper and magazine accounts. Several documentary films will also be shown. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0248A-F13

CRN: 91786

History of the Soviet Union

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Y-F13

CRN: 91787

History of the Soviet Union
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0248Z-F13

CRN: 91788

History of the Soviet Union
Discussion

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

HIST0257A-F13

CRN: 92285

The Holocaust

The Holocaust
Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0288A-F13

CRN: 91790

Modern Brazil

Modern Brazil
Brazil is the Portuguese-speaking power of Latin America. In this course we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day, and discuss the contemporary developments that have transformed Brazil into an international force today. We will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history during the empire, the first republic, the Vargas era, and the military dictatorship. We will conclude with a look at Brazil's representative democracy from the 1980s to the present. (formerly HIST 0211) 3 hr. lect.

HIST0309A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0309A-F13

CRN: 92373

Tech & Power in American Hist.
Please register via AMST 0309A

Technology and Power in American History
In this course we will consider how technological artifacts and systems have constituted, mediated, and reproduced relationships of power with a particular attention to hierarchies of race, gender, class, and nation. We will examine the relationships between humans and technologies within the context of globalization from early colonial America through the 21st century. We will consider a variety of technologies and social settings such as guns, slave ships, plantations, factories, prisons, physical and virtual border fences, computers, mobile phones, human bodies, and reproduction. We will ask whether technology has produced a better America, and for whom. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0369A-F13

CRN: 92289

East India Company

The East India Company
In this course you will be introduced to the English East India Company, from the 17th-century until its dissolution in 1858. Much of our focus will be on the Company’s presence in India, and we will pay particular attention to its transformation from a maritime trading company into a territorial colonial state. We will read a number of controversial texts from the period, immerse ourselves in the worlds of Company and Indian politics, and do guided research using holdings in Middlebury’s Special Collections. Topics will include the rise of the Company as a trading concern, its aggressive competition with other European trading monopolies and South Asian kingdoms, and the importance of opium in its dealings with China. We will end with a discussion of the Indian rebellion of 1857. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1308 or HIST 1009)

HIST0373A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0373A-F13 GSFS0373A-F13

CRN: 92177

History of American Women

History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0373X-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0373X-F13 GSFS0373X-F13

CRN: 92181

History of American Women
Discussion

History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0373Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0373Y-F13 GSFS0373Y-F13

CRN: 92182

History of American Women
Discussion

History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0373Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0373Z-F13 GSFS0373Z-F13

CRN: 92183

History of American Women
Discussion

History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HIST0375A-F13

CRN: 92290

Struggles in Southern Africa

Struggles for Change in Southern Africa
In this course we will examine the tumultuous period of social struggle in southern Africa in the decades following World War II. Major topics to be covered include the rise of apartheid and the mobilization of anti-apartheid resistance in South Africa and Namibia; the liberation struggle against white settler rule in Zimbabwe; the fight for freedom from Portuguese colonialism in Mozambique; and Mozambique's protracted civil war following independence. A central purpose of this course is to explore how these different arenas of struggle transformed individual lives and social relations in complex and diverse ways, generating enduring impacts and challenges within the region.

HIST0377A-F13

CRN: 92291

Comparative Slavery

Comparative Slavery in the Americas
In this course we will examine the development and decline of the institution of slavery in the United States between 1619 and 1865 by comparing the institution to slavery in the Caribbean and Latin America (principally Brazil). Themes and topics to be explored include: ecology and slavery, religion and slavery, the international slave trade, nationalisms and race, slave communities, slave resistance, emancipation, and freedom. Readings for the course will range from scholarly monographs to slave narratives.

HIST0410A-F13

CRN: 92292

Readings in Soviet History

Readings in Soviet History: The "New Man" in the Russian and Soviet Imagination
In this seminar we will examine that superman of modernity who inspired and terrified a century of Russian philosophers, artists, and revolutionaries: the New Man. We will explore the emergence and development of this ideal type between the 1840s and the 1940s. We will trace how radical socialists and religious conservatives constantly re-conceptualized him, and we will study Soviet attempts to transform its citizens into New Men and Women through Marxism-Leninism. Readings will include many of Russia's greatest philosophical and literary works of the period.

HIST0436A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0436A-F13

CRN: 92293

Readings in Japanese History

Readings in Japanese History: Modernism and Fascism between the World Wars
The 1920s in Japan is typically understood as a period of political and cultural experimentation, as witnessed by the rise of avant-garde cultural groups and radicalized social movements. In contrast, the 1930s is portrayed as Japan's "dark valley", in which this sense of experimentation was suppressed or co-opted by the state. In this course, we will revisit these tumultuous decades by engaging with a range of historical assessments, novels, and critical essays. We will begin by examining theories of modernism and fascism, and then explore the changing socio-cultural milieu in interwar Japan, including mass-culture, modernization, romanticism, imperialism, and utopianism. (formerly HIST 0418)

HIST0500A-F13

CRN: 90523

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500C-F13

CRN: 90888

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500D-F13

CRN: 90889

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500F-F13

CRN: 90891

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500G-F13

CRN: 90892

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500H-F13

CRN: 90902

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500I-F13

CRN: 90993

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500J-F13

CRN: 90994

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500L-F13

CRN: 90996

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500N-F13

CRN: 90997

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500S-F13

CRN: 91002

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500T-F13

CRN: 91003

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500U-F13

CRN: 91004

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0600A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0600B-F13

CRN: 91250

History Research Seminar

History Research Seminar
All history majors who have not taken a writing and research seminar are required to take HIST 0600 in their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course, students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material to the degree possible. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors. HIST 0600 is also open to International Studies and Environmental Studies majors with a disciplinary focus in history. 3 hr. sem

HIST0600B-F13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0600A-F13

CRN: 91251

History Research Seminar

History Research Seminar
All history majors who have not taken a writing and research seminar are required to take HIST 0600 in their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course, students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material to the degree possible. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors. HIST 0600 is also open to International Studies and Environmental Studies majors with a disciplinary focus in history. 3 hr. sem

HIST0700A-F13

CRN: 90524

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700B-F13

CRN: 90734

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700C-F13

CRN: 90735

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700D-F13

CRN: 90736

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700F-F13

CRN: 90738

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700G-F13

CRN: 90739

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700H-F13

CRN: 90740

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700I-F13

CRN: 90741

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700J-F13

CRN: 90742

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700L-F13

CRN: 90744

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700N-F13

CRN: 90746

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700R-F13

CRN: 90904

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700S-F13

CRN: 90903

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700T-F13

CRN: 91006

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700U-F13

CRN: 91007

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.