Middlebury

 

Sections

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PHIL0150A-S12

CRN: 20048

Intro Phil Tradition

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. Students should register for a discussion session. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150X-S12

CRN: 22360

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. Students should register for a discussion session. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Y-S12

CRN: 22359

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. Students should register for a discussion session. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Z-S12

CRN: 22358

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. Students should register for a discussion session. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-S12

CRN: 20824

Introduction to Modern Logic

The aim of this course is to provide a sound understanding of the principles of deductive reasoning through the study of modern symbolic logic. Students will learn how to translate natural arguments into the formal languages of propositional and predicate logic and study both natural deduction and truth-functional derivation systems for these languages, as well as learning techniques for analyzing and evaluating natural arguments. Mastery of these methods and techniques will enable students to evaluate the validity of a wide range of arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180X-S12

CRN: 21821

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

The aim of this course is to provide a sound understanding of the principles of deductive reasoning through the study of modern symbolic logic. Students will learn how to translate natural arguments into the formal languages of propositional and predicate logic and study both natural deduction and truth-functional derivation systems for these languages, as well as learning techniques for analyzing and evaluating natural arguments. Mastery of these methods and techniques will enable students to evaluate the validity of a wide range of arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Y-S12

CRN: 21223

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

The aim of this course is to provide a sound understanding of the principles of deductive reasoning through the study of modern symbolic logic. Students will learn how to translate natural arguments into the formal languages of propositional and predicate logic and study both natural deduction and truth-functional derivation systems for these languages, as well as learning techniques for analyzing and evaluating natural arguments. Mastery of these methods and techniques will enable students to evaluate the validity of a wide range of arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-S12

CRN: 20825

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

The aim of this course is to provide a sound understanding of the principles of deductive reasoning through the study of modern symbolic logic. Students will learn how to translate natural arguments into the formal languages of propositional and predicate logic and study both natural deduction and truth-functional derivation systems for these languages, as well as learning techniques for analyzing and evaluating natural arguments. Mastery of these methods and techniques will enable students to evaluate the validity of a wide range of arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0250A-S12

CRN: 21224

Early Modern Philosophy

Early Modern Philosophy
This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs lect.

PHIL0285A-S12

CRN: 21941

Idea of the Ethical

The Idea of the Ethical
What is the basis for morality? The great turning point of the history of modern European philosophy, particularly ethical philosophy, came at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century with Kant's new account of the possibility of moral philosophy and Hegel's critique of that account. In this course, we shall investigate Kant's moral philosophy and Hegel's response to it, and then we will consider the ways in which a series of major thinkers attempted to rethink the idea of the ethical in the light of this dispute. We will consider Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Emerson, and Nietzsche and conclude with an account of 20th century developments. (Some prior work in philosophy would be useful background) 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0302A-S12

CRN: 21942

Philosophy of Plato

Philosophy of Plato
In this class, we will explore the significance, influence, and development of Plato's thought, paying special attention to the form of the dramatic dialogue and topics such as Platonic love, rhetoric and politics, learning and recollection, and the theory of forms. We will begin with the early period (dialogues such as the Meno and the Apology) focused on the historical figure of Socrates, continue to the middle period (Symposium, Republic), in which Plato develops his own distinctive views; and conclude with the later period (Philebus, Parmenides) in which Plato suggests a critique of Socrates and his own earlier positions. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver)

PHIL0305A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S12

CRN: 22005

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305A

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0352A-S12

CRN: 21943

Philosophy Of Mind

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs.lect.

PHIL0352X-S12

CRN: 22361

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs.lect.

PHIL0352Y-S12

CRN: 22362

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs.lect.

PHIL0352Z-S12

CRN: 22363

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs.lect.

PHIL0356A-S12

CRN: 21944

Philosophy & Environment

Philosophy and the Environment
In this course, we will examine several environmental issues from a philosophical perspective. We will be interested in what arguments can be provided to support particular views, but more important, we will try to identify the deep philosophical issues that underlie particular debates. For example, what is the basis for our determinations of value? We will also examine the challenges that large scale environmental issues present for particular philosophical theories. For example, how well can particular ethical theories handle certain environmental problems? Topics may include animal rights, wilderness preservation, biodiversity, attitudes toward nature, over-population, and economic arguments for the protection of the environment. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver) 3 hrs.lect.

PHIL0422A-S12

CRN: 21945

Mind And World

Mind and World
What is the nature of reality? Does reality exist independently of the mind (realism), or is it dependent on the minds that know it (idealism)? This seminar will consider various responses to the debate between realism and idealism in recent Anglo-American philosophy. Beginning with Bertrand Russell, twentieth century Anglo-American philosophy focused in particular on the issue of whether, and how, language "constructs" the world. We will examine the views of seminal thinkers such as Russell, James, and Wittgenstein, and then consider the shape of the contemporary debate in thinkers such as Davidson, Rorty, and McDowell. An important theme of the course will be recent efforts, stemming from Wittgenstein, to move beyond the traditional realism/idealism dichotomy by developing a new form of realism in which reality itself has subjective characteristics, and subjects are immediately in touch with reality. (Designed for junior and senior majors; open to others by waiver.) 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0425A-S12

CRN: 21946

Concepts of Explanation

Concepts of Explanation
In a variety of contexts, we use explanations to further our understanding and knowledge of the world; philosophers have used "inference to the best explanation" to offer solutions to various philosophical problems. But what exactly is an explanation? What makes one explanation better than another? Which uses of explanation yield knowledge rather than mere opinion? In this course, we will examine some of the following: different philosophical analyses of explanation, explanatory coherence as a theory of justification, and defenses and critiques of inference to the best explanation. Familiarity with contemporary theories of knowledge (PHIL 0351) and the philosophy of science (PHIL 0216) is helpful, but not necessary. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-S12

CRN: 20085

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500B-S12

CRN: 20954

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500C-S12

CRN: 20086

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500D-S12

CRN: 20690

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500E-S12

CRN: 20087

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500F-S12

CRN: 20375

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500G-S12

CRN: 20694

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0700A-S12

CRN: 20089

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-S12

CRN: 20656

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-S12

CRN: 20657

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-S12

CRN: 20696

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700E-S12

CRN: 20697

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-S12

CRN: 20698

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700G-S12

CRN: 20699

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700K-S12

CRN: 21415

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)