Sections

« Winter 2018 Spring 2018

PHIL0150A-S18

CRN: 21465

Intro Phil Tradition
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Y-S18

CRN: 21466

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Z-S18

CRN: 21467

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-S18

CRN: 22128

Introduction to Modern Logic
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Y-S18

CRN: 22130

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-S18

CRN: 22131

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0210A-S18

CRN: 22481

Contemporary Ethical Theory
Contemporary Ethical Theory
In this course we will explore some major texts in recent moral and political philosophy. Our primary focus will be on twenty-first century issues and insights. We will attempt to formulate our own views on questions such as: Is substantive moral and political theory still possible? If so, what is justice? What actions, practices, or dispositions are good or bad, right or wrong, virtuous or vicious? Are a plurality of approaches to moral decision-making justified? Or should we strive for an approach that organizes moral cognition around a single supreme value, principle, standard, law, concept, or ideal? (Previous PHIL course or PSCI 0101 recommended, but not required.) 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0233A-S18

CRN: 22136

Aesthetics
Aesthetics
In this course we will investigate the nature of art and aesthetic experience through readings from historical and contemporary philosophers and artists. Is art essentially rational or non-rational, and can it offer a deeper insight into reality than discursive knowledge can? What is beauty, and is it essential to art? What is the relation between art and the ethical, the social, and the political? We will consider both influential traditional theories of art such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Nietzsche, and more recent modern and postmodern critiques of traditional views. Readings will also include works by artists such as Van Gogh and Kandinsky.

PHIL0250A-S18

CRN: 20912

Early Modern Philosophy
Early Modern Philosophy
This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs lect.

PHIL0252A-S18

CRN: 21931

Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0252Y-S18

CRN: 22019

Philosophy of Mind
Discussion
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0252Z-S18

CRN: 22020

Philosophy of Mind
Discussion
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0280A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0280A-S18

CRN: 22132

Formal Semantics
Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (Some prior familiarity with formal logic is recommended, but not required.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

PHIL0305A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S18 HIST0305B-S18 PHIL0305B-S18

CRN: 21823

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305A
Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0305B-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S18 HIST0305B-S18 PHIL0305A-S18

CRN: 21824

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305B
Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0319A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0319A-S18 HIST0319B-S18 PHIL0319B-S18

CRN: 22292

Philosophy of History
Please register via HIST 0319A
Readings in the Philosophy of History
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0319B-S18

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0319A-S18 HIST0319B-S18 PHIL0319A-S18

CRN: 22375

Philosophy of History
Please register via HIST 0319B
Readings in the Philosophy of History
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0320A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0320A-S18

CRN: 22293

Seminar in Buddhist Philosophy
Please register via RELI 0320A
Seminar in Buddhist Philosophy: Yogacara Depth Psychology and Philosophy of Mind
In this seminar we will survey the basic ideas of Yogacara Buddhism (4-6th c. CE), one of two major schools of Indian Buddhism, in relation to cognitive science and philosophy of mind. We will examine these ideas historically, philosophically and comparatively. We focus on the Yogacara analyses of the largely unconscious ‘construction of reality’ and its systematic deconstruction through forms of analytic meditation. We will read primary and secondary texts on Indian Buddhism and texts espousing similar ideas in modern philosophy and the social and cognitive sciences. (one course on philosophy or RELI 0120, RELI 0220, RELI 0223, RELI 0224, RELI 0225, RELI 0226, RELI 0227or RELI 0228.) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0330A-S18

CRN: 22361

Foucault: Autonomy in Power
Foucault: Autonomy in Power
In this course we will examine the philosophy of Michel Foucault in order to develop a deeper understanding of what it would be to live a genuinely free life. To this end, we will consider the three main phases of Foucault’s career —corresponding to the analysis of discursive and epistemological practices, political and institutional practices, and ethical and spiritual practice— as successive stages of a lifelong systematic attempt to determine whether living freely requires breaking away from traditional ways of thinking and of being, and whether and how independent from tradition might be possible. 3 hrs. Sem.

PHIL0434A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0434A-S18

CRN: 22135

Feminist Epistemologies
Feminist Epistemologies
In recent years, feminist epistemologies, such as feminist standpoint theories and feminist empiricisms, have been extremely influential in developing social theories of knowledge. They have also served as a crucial intellectual tool for feminist theorists trying to understand the connections between social relations of gender and the production of knowledge and ignorance. In this course we will investigate some of the major themes and challenges of feminist epistemologies and feminist philosophies of science: How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? We will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy. We will also consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations. (Approval required; Open to philosophy and GSFS senior and junior majors. GSFS majors must have previously taken GSFS 0320, or permission.) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-S18

CRN: 20062

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500B-S18

CRN: 20740

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500C-S18

CRN: 20063

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500D-S18

CRN: 20530

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500E-S18

CRN: 20064

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500F-S18

CRN: 20288

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500G-S18

CRN: 20534

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0700A-S18

CRN: 20066

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-S18

CRN: 20502

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-S18

CRN: 20503

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-S18

CRN: 20536

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700E-S18

CRN: 20537

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-S18

CRN: 20538

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700G-S18

CRN: 20539

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Department of Philosophy

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

802.443.6011 fax