Middlebury

 

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PSCI0103A-F12

CRN: 90712

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103U-F12

CRN: 91475

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103V-F12

CRN: 91476

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103W-F12

CRN: 91477

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0104A-F12

CRN: 90711

Intro to American Politics

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104X-F12

CRN: 90091

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Y-F12

CRN: 90100

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Z-F12

CRN: 90109

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0107A-F12

CRN: 91149

Politics & Studies of Politics

Politics and the Studies of Politics
This course will consider classic texts of Western political thought. The aims of the course are to see what each of the texts says about politics, and to determine the modes of thought of the text. For example, we will pay close attention both to the substance of Aristotle's political science and to the manner in which he conducts his inquiry. Other works may include Thomas Aquinas, Summae; William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan; Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America; speeches by Thomas Macaulay; and writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0107Y-F12

CRN: 91151

Politics & Studies of Politics
Discussion

Politics and the Studies of Politics
This course will consider classic texts of Western political thought. The aims of the course are to see what each of the texts says about politics, and to determine the modes of thought of the text. For example, we will pay close attention both to the substance of Aristotle's political science and to the manner in which he conducts his inquiry. Other works may include Thomas Aquinas, Summae; William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan; Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America; speeches by Thomas Macaulay; and writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0107Z-F12

CRN: 91152

Politics & Studies of Politics
Discussion

Politics and the Studies of Politics
This course will consider classic texts of Western political thought. The aims of the course are to see what each of the texts says about politics, and to determine the modes of thought of the text. For example, we will pay close attention both to the substance of Aristotle's political science and to the manner in which he conducts his inquiry. Other works may include Thomas Aquinas, Summae; William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan; Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America; speeches by Thomas Macaulay; and writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0109A-F12

CRN: 91240

International Politics

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-F12

CRN: 91241

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-F12

CRN: 91242

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-F12

CRN: 91243

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0206A-F12

CRN: 91553

American Presidency

The American Presidency
This course examines the development and modern practice of presidential leadership. Focus is on presidential decision-making, changes in the structure of the presidency as an institution, differences among individual presidents, and the interaction of the president with other major actors, including national governing institutions (executive branch, Congress, courts), interest groups, media, and the public. The course includes an historical overview of the evolution of the presidency, and examines changes in the electoral process. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211A-F12

CRN: 91709

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211A

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211X-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211X-F12

CRN: 91710

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211X

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211Y-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211Y-F12

CRN: 91711

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211Y

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211Z-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211Z-F12

CRN: 91712

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211Z

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0214A-F12

CRN: 91470

Intl Environmental Politics

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Y-F12

CRN: 92907

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Z-F12

CRN: 92909

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0225A-F12

CRN: 92688

West European Politics

West European Politics
An introduction to the domestic politics of Western Europe since 1945, focusing on Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the European Union. Topics include representation, the role of the state in promoting economic growth, social capital and democratic performance, transitions to democracy, and the welfare state. The second half of the course will focus on issues high on the current European agenda, including unemployment, economic reform, the rise of far-right parties and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0242A-F12

CRN: 92689

International Politics and WMD

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Y-F12

CRN: 92903

International Politics and WMD
Discussion

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Z-F12

CRN: 92905

International Politics and WMD
Discussion

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0251A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0251A-F12

CRN: 92829

Identity/Conflict South Asia
Please register via INTL 0251A

Identity and Conflict in South Asia
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0262A-F12

CRN: 92975

Might and Right Among Nations

Might and Right Among Nations
What role does justice play in international politics? What role should it play? Does it pay to act justly in the conduct of foreign affairs? In this course, we will examine the place of ethical considerations in international politics. Drawing upon major works of political theory, we will pay special attention to the relationship between justice and necessity, the ethics of war and deception, and plans for perpetual peace. Authors will include Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Kant, Weber, Woodrow Wilson, and Michael Walzer. 3 hrs. lect.

PSCI0306A-F12

CRN: 92691

American Constitutional Law

American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Lawis the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0308A-F12

CRN: 92692

U.S. National Elections

U. S. National Elections
In this course we will analyze Presidential national elections in the United States. Topics covered will include party systems, electoral realignment, voting behavior and turnout, candidate strategy, the nomination process, the legal framework for elections, the Electoral College, gender, race and ethnicity, the media, the Internet, and U.S. elections in comparative perspective. Although most analysis will the focus will be on the 2012 upcoming congressional and presidential contests, earlier elections will be studied for insight into continuity and change in American electoral politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. American Politics)

PSCI0317A-F12

CRN: 92934

Ancient & Med. Pol. Philosophy

Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy
We will study some classic works in ancient and medieval political philosophy: Plato (Laws, Republic); Aristotle (Ethics, Politics); Cicero (Republic, Laws), Maimonides (Guide to the Perplexed), Aquinas (Summa Theologica, Summa Contra Gentiles), Alfarabi (The Political Regime). (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0320A-F12

CRN: 92935

American Pol Development

American Political Development
This course will trace the development of the American political system from its founding through the present. We will pay special attention to the response of the governing system to crucial events in American History, such as the Civil War, the rise of industrialism, and the New Deal. Among the topics explored will be the growth in size and power of the federal executive branch and the rise in importance of interest groups in American politics. This course will be taught in a seminar format. (One course in American politics or American history) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0368A-F12

CRN: 91341

Frontiers in Political Science

Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0380A-F12

CRN: 92693

Int'l Relations of East Asia

International Relations of East Asia
Although the power of East Asian states makes the region central to US foreign policy and the study of international politics in general, most international relations theorists rely heavily upon European history and case studies. In this course, we will explore IR theory and East Asian politics in an attempt to enrich both. We will review major events in East Asia, explore advanced theoretical readings and their applications to the region, and finally, use these theories to understand issues like energy security, territorial disputes, and prospects for democratic development. (PSCI 0109) (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect/disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0390A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0390A-F12

CRN: 91854

Env Negotiation/Dispute Res
Please register via ENVS 0390A

Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of environmental negotiation and dispute resolution as applied to public policy at both the domestic and international levels. We will consider the mutual gains approach to negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and dispute systems design. We will grapple with challenging features typical of environmental negotiations, such as the large number of stakeholders involved, scientific uncertainty, and value differences. We will undertake role-playing simulations. Throughout, we will think critically about the negotiating styles and assumptions employed by both seminar participants and those presented in course materials. (Junior or Senior standing; Sophomores by approval; ENVS 0211 or IGST 0101 or PSCI 0109). 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0413A-F12

CRN: 92694

Mass Media&Democratization

Media and Democratization
The news media can either support or undermine non-democratic regimes. This tension between media liberalization and political control is well-captured in Yuezhi Zhao’s book Communication in China: Political Economy, Power and Conflict, which will serve as a thematic anchor for this course. We will examine the impact of print, television, and new media on democratization in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Africa, while drawing from the literature on democratic transitions and the communications literature on media effects. The goal of the course is to understand the causes of press freedom, its role in the erosion of state control, and its implications for the survival of authoritarian regimes. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0430A-F12

CRN: 92939

Pol Econ Global Lat Amer: Mex

Political Economy of Globalization in Latin America: The Mexican Case
How does globalization affect developing countries? What general lessons might a single country's response to globalization teach? What economic, political, or social consequences arise from embracing or resisting globalization? We will examine such issues by focusing on Mexico, one of Latin America's most dynamic economies and a leading U.S. trade partner. Themes will include the politics of colonialism, revolution, authoritarianism, and democratization; economic modernization and economic/political crises; economic integration, drug trafficking, and immigration. These themes will be set against the backdrop of historic and contemporary globalization, and Mexico's encounters with "core" states in Europe, North America, and international institutions. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0431A-F12

CRN: 92695

African Government
African Government

African Government
Sub-Saharan Africa has been described as being in a state of permanent crisis, a place where disorder and chaos reign and states are chronically weak. How do political systems form and thrive under such conditions? What accounts for their survival in the face of tremendous political, economic, and environmental challenges? We will investigate the distinctive characteristics of African political systems, the different governance models throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the types of public goods or public ills these systems have produced. We will also have the opportunity to more deeply appreciate the real-life consequences for displaced Africans through a service-learning component. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0452A-F12

CRN: 91844

Transnatl/Transform Environ

Transnational Transformations and the Environment
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0462A-F12

CRN: 92976

Empire and Political Theory

Empire and Political Theory
In this course, we will examine empire as an idea and a political form. Drawing upon works by major political theorists, we will pose a range of questions raised by the phenomenon of empire. What is empire? Why does it arise? Does it find root in some element of human nature or the nature of political communities? Can empire be justified? Can democratic and liberal regimes be imperialistic? If so, are they inherently so? What about the US or the EU? Authors will include Herodotus, Plutarch, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Vitoria, Locke, Burke, Mill, Tocqueville, and Hobson. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0482A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
INTL0482A-F12

CRN: 92770

Public/Private Governance
Please register via INTL 0482A

Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. The final research projects will require research in a language other than English. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0482. International Relations

PSCI0500A-F12

CRN: 90314

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-F12

CRN: 90318

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-F12

CRN: 90341

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-F12

CRN: 90342

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-F12

CRN: 91102

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-F12

CRN: 90343

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-F12

CRN: 90345

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-F12

CRN: 90350

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-F12

CRN: 90881

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-F12

CRN: 90882

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-F12

CRN: 90883

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-F12

CRN: 91103

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500S-F12

CRN: 90886

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500T-F12

CRN: 91223

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-F12

CRN: 91434

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-F12

CRN: 91715

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-F12

CRN: 90353

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-F12

CRN: 90356

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-F12

CRN: 90360

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-F12

CRN: 90361

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-F12

CRN: 90363

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-F12

CRN: 90364

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700J-F12

CRN: 90369

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-F12

CRN: 90373

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-F12

CRN: 90921

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-F12

CRN: 90922

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-F12

CRN: 90923

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700S-F12

CRN: 90926

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700T-F12

CRN: 91224

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-F12

CRN: 91716

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)