Middlebury

 

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PSCI0104A-W13

CRN: 11325

Intro to American Politics

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0500A-W13

CRN: 10199

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-W13

CRN: 10202

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-W13

CRN: 10214

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-W13

CRN: 10215

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-W13

CRN: 10807

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-W13

CRN: 10216

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-W13

CRN: 10808

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-W13

CRN: 10219

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-W13

CRN: 10380

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-W13

CRN: 10381

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-W13

CRN: 10418

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500S-W13

CRN: 10421

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500T-W13

CRN: 11040

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-W13

CRN: 11068

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-W13

CRN: 11240

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-W13

CRN: 10221

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-W13

CRN: 10224

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-W13

CRN: 10229

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-W13

CRN: 10230

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-W13

CRN: 10810

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-W13

CRN: 10231

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-W13

CRN: 10234

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-W13

CRN: 10235

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-W13

CRN: 10382

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-W13

CRN: 10383

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-W13

CRN: 11228

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-W13

CRN: 10422

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700S-W13

CRN: 10425

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700T-W13

CRN: 11060

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-W13

CRN: 11069

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI1003A-W13

CRN: 11359

Euro-Atlantic Relations

Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we will examine the history, current condition, and prospective future of US-European relations, focusing primarily on security aspects but with reference to political and economic contexts. The learning process will include lectures, class discussions, guest speakers, a role-playing exercise, and a final policy options paper. Issues covered will include: persistent and changing aspects of the “transatlantic bargain”; impact of 9/11 and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; Obama administration policies; US and European interests; NATO relations with Russia; NATO, the European Union and the UN; burden sharing; NATO’s new strategic concept; implications for NATO of US security focus on Asia. (This course counts as an elective towards the major in Political Science). (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

PSCI1016A-W13

CRN: 11405

Dictators and Democrats

Dictators and Democrats
How do dictators come into and stay in power? Why and how do they relinquish control of their nation and government? What distinguishes democrats from dictators? This course explores the processes through which charismatic individuals create, transform, or circumvent state institutions to seize and/or maintain political power. We will examine individual, national, and international factors that propel dictators to leadership positions. We will also look at the historical context and personal circumstances that lead to a dictators' demise, and that sometimes result in the establishment of a democratic regime. We will study cases from Europe (Churchill, Hitler, Atatürk, Milosevic), Asia (Ghandi, Mao, Pol Pot, Stalin), America (FDR, Clinton, G. W. Bush, Pinochet, Perón, Duvalier), and Africa (Mandela, Mobutu, Idi Amin, Mugabe). (Comparative Politics)

PSCI1019A-W13

CRN: 11406

War Games

War Games
Why do wars happen? Social interactions often follow basic patterns whether the individuals in question are negotiating minor issues, like prices at a farmer’s market, or major issues, like the terms of settlement in war. We are familiar with many of these in the form of children’s games or games of strategy. In this course we will connect these games to broader non-cooperative interactions, particularly to wars between and within nations. While not a course on tactical behaviors, this course is an exploration of strategic behaviors (bargaining, bluffing, and learning) that lead nations into very costly conflicts. (International Relations)

PSCI1029A-W13

CRN: 11111

VT Government & Politics

Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will meet with those involved in the process and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. This course counts as elective credit towards the Political Science major. (American Politics)/

PSCI1031A-W13

CRN: 11407

Protest Music-Comparative

Protest Music in Comparative Perspective
In this course we will examine how marginalized populations around the world use music to interpret, explain, and respond to political, racial, socioeconomic, and gendered inequities. Because music is produced for a wide audience, it is important for the construction of group identity and a useful means of protest. We will discuss the domestic politics of countries such as Nigeria, Jamaica, the U.S., and Brazil by reading the literature of comparative politics, sociology, and critical race and gender theory. Our discussion of these topics will help us better understand how power in various forms is used to repress, and how music challenges existing hegemonies. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI1032A-W13

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL1032A-W13

CRN: 11358

Philosophy & Politics
Plurality: Philosophy/Politics

Plurality: Philosophy and Politics from Plato to Arendt
Western philosophy insists that by thinking alone we can better learn to live together. Yet starting with Plato's description of the philosopher who must be forced back to society after ascending to the realm of ideas, this tradition often finds itself caught between individual reflection as a means of overcoming common prejudices and the need to find meaning in a common world. In this course we will explore questions of justice, liberty, and authority in Ancient Greek and Enlightenment texts before turning to the early 20th century forms of existentialism that, in their intense focus on individual experience, provide Hannah Arendt with surprising resources for conceptualizing humans as fundamentally plural beings who are both equal and distinct. (This course counts as elective credit towards the Political Science major) (Political Theory)

PSCI1033A-W13

CRN: 11408

Reading Adam Smith

Reading Adam Smith
In this course we will read Adam Smith’s two great works, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and The Wealth of Nations (1776). Smith’s The Wealth of Nations is known for its elaboration of the principles of liberal capitalism. However, understanding Smith’s full teaching requires a study of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, which contains a full discussion of the human passions, especially sympathy. Both works contain Smith’s famous “invisible hand” metaphor. As both Jefferson and Hamilton admired Smith’s work, and as Americans continue to debate the relationship between politics and economics, we will conclude by considering the application of Smith's principles to America. (Political Theory)

PSCI1034A-W13

Cross-Listed As:
WAGS1034A-W13

CRN: 11371

Women in American Politics

Women in American Politics
In this course, we will cover a wide variety of issues concerning women in American politics, examining a mixture of sources from history, political science, and popular culture. In part one of this course, we will discuss highlights of the history of women in politics in the United States. In parts two and three we will build on this knowledge by exploring how the legacy of women’s political activism affects women in America today: part two addresses women’s political behavior outside of elective office, and part three addresses women in elective office. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Political Science and the major in Women's and Gender Studies) (American Politics)

PSCI1130A-W13

Cross-Listed As:
INTD1130A-W13

CRN: 11421

Statistics for Social Sciences

Statistics for Social Sciences
In this course, which assumes no background in quantitative methods, students will be introduced to the necessary skills to analyze data sets and derive meaningful conclusions and interpretations. We will combine exposition to statistical theory with practical uses of statistical modeling, and we will explore common statistical tools used in both industrial and research environments including STATA and/or R. We will apply the classroom material to real-world data sets in regular lab sessions. We will focus on data and examples from social sciences, but the course will be generally applicable to students of all disciplines. (Political Theory)