Sections

« Fall 2017 Spring 2018

PSCI0101A-S18

CRN: 22294

Intro to Political Philosophy
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101X-S18

CRN: 22456

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Y-S18

CRN: 22457

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Z-S18

CRN: 22458

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0102A-S18

CRN: 22230

American Political Regime
The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102X-S18

CRN: 22459

American Political Regime
Discussion
The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Y-S18

CRN: 22460

American Political Regime
Discussion
The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Z-S18

CRN: 22461

American Political Regime
Discussion
The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0103A-S18

CRN: 20011

Intro to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-S18

CRN: 20558

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-S18

CRN: 20559

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-S18

CRN: 20560

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0104A-S18

CRN: 21743

Intro to American Politics
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104X-S18

CRN: 21744

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Y-S18

CRN: 21745

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Z-S18

CRN: 21746

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0109A-S18

CRN: 20908

International Politics
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-S18

CRN: 20909

International Politics
Discussion
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-S18

CRN: 20910

International Politics
Discussion
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-S18

CRN: 20911

International Politics
Discussion
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0215A-S18

CRN: 22295

Fed. State & Local Politics
Federalism, State and Local Politics
What are the unique political opportunities and constraints facing state and local governments? How have these changed over time? In this course we examine the relationships between different levels of government in the U.S. federal system, considering the particular tasks and dilemmas facing states and cities, and scrutinizing the complex interactions between governments that characterize federalism in the United States. Topics include local political culture, intergovernmental grants, state parties, and state political economy. Vermont, New York, and California will receive special scrutiny. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0217A-S18

CRN: 21545

Politics of M. East & N.Africa
Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
This course is an introduction to important themes, concepts, and cases in the study of Middle Eastern and North African politics. We will examine key political issues in the region, focusing primarily on developments since World War II and issues of relevance to the region today. For the purposes of this course, the region is defined as the countries of the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran. The first half of the course introduces major themes in Middle Eastern politics. These include state development, nationalism, revolution, authoritarian rule, the petro-state, the Arab-Israeli conflict, conflicts in the Persian Gulf, civil conflict, the rise of Islamism, and attempts at liberal reform. The second half of the course examines how these themes have affected political development in a number of key cases. Primary cases include Egypt, Israel, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq. Students will have the opportunity to individually assess other countries of personal interest in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0221A-S18

CRN: 22231

Contemporary Chinese Politics
Contemporary Chinese Politics
This introductory course provides students with a background in how the party-state political system functions, and then investigates the major political issues in China today. We will focus first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. China is a quickly changing country, so students will focus on analyzing current events but also have an opportunity to explore a topic of interest in more detail. 3 hrs. lect./disc. Comparative Politics

PSCI0222A-S18

CRN: 22310

Political Economy Middle East
Political Economy of the Middle East
In this course we will study the political economy of the Middle East. More specifically, we will examine the regional mechanisms of production/distribution of resources as well as their political consequences. Questions to be addressed include: What are the causes of economic development and underdevelopment in the region? What is the role of the state, social classes, religion, and factor endowments in regional development? What are the political ramifications of the resource curse? Main themes of the course include state-business relations and crony capitalism, the military-industrial complex, rentier states, human development, unemployment and inequality in the context of the Middle East. 3 hrs. lect.

PSCI0223A-S18

CRN: 22498

Populism and Democracy
Populism and Democracy
Democracy may be government of the people, by the people, for the people. But at times throughout American history, the people (or some segment of them) have believed that their government was not for them. Today we call them populists. They have been at once rooted in the ideals of democracy and critical, even contemptuous, of democratic politics. In this course we will read what populists wrote to see who they were: Antifederalists, Tocqueville, proponents of Jacksonian Democracy, the great Agrarians at the turn of the twentieth century, Jane Addams and Huey P. Long and John Steinbeck, and—inevitably—Trump. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect.

PSCI0233A-S18

CRN: 22485

Global Change and Continuity
Globalization: Change and Continuity
In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0233X-S18

CRN: 22495

Global Change and Continuity
Discussion
Globalization: Change and Continuity
In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0233Y-S18

CRN: 22496

Global Change and Continuity
Discussion
Globalization: Change and Continuity
In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0233Z-S18

CRN: 22497

Global Change and Continuity
Discussion
Globalization: Change and Continuity
In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0239A-S18

CRN: 21610

Future Great Power Relations
The Future of Great Power Relations
Will America’s global preeminence endure in the 21st century? Will Russia, Japan, and the European Union decline while other powers grow more influential? In this course we will explore the future global balance of power and prospects for cooperation and conflict among the world’s great powers. Topics include the rise of Brazil, China, and India; the changing nature of American power; the causality of global power shifts and their implications for cooperation or competition on issues such as energy security, cyber security, nuclear nonproliferation, UN Security Council reform, intervention in the Middle East, and Sino-American relations. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0250A-S18

CRN: 22296

Intl Diplomacy and Mod. S Asia
International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to IGST 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304A-S18

CRN: 20554

Internatl Political Economy
International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0326A-S18

CRN: 22317

Media and Minorities
The Media and Minorities
In this course we use techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab to examine how the media portray identifiable groups. These techniques enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how different types of groups--such as, for example, immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others--have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will contribute to ongoing publication projects of the lab, and will have the opportunity to pursue their own research topics. Student projects will culminate in research papers that may form the basis for further independent work or for senior theses. 3hrs. seminar (Comparative Politics) (Approval Only)

PSCI0340A-S18

CRN: 22233

Intl. Order & Organization
International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0340Y-S18

CRN: 22462

Intl. Order & Organization
Discussion
International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0340Z-S18

CRN: 22463

Intl. Order & Organization
Discussion
International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0392A-S18

CRN: 21555

Insurgency and Security Policy
Insurgency and Security Policy
In the post-Cold War era insurgency is the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns. Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency in cases around the world in comparative perspective allows students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat emergent non-state threats. How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological, and geographical conditions? What are the implications for international intervention and homeland security policy? This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective. Note: To align the Middlebury and MIIS schedules, Middlebury students will need to begin their coursework prior to the end of Winter Term, and will need to be available to meet during the course’s non-standard time. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0426A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0426A-S18

CRN: 22315

Critical Frames Social Change
Health, Food, and Poverty: Critical Frameworks for Social Change
Concerns around food, health, and poverty often intersect around the world, and pose shared challenges for countries in how to address them. What frameworks might maximize social impact in addressing such complicated global concerns? In this capstone course for students interested in privilege and poverty, global health, and food studies, we will critically examine a variety of frameworks for social impact, including solidarity, responsibility, development, aid, and entrepreneurship. Our examination of these frameworks will necessarily involve critical comparisons among the countries in which they have been employed. We will identify goals, strategies, and assumptions within each framework, as well as our role in social transformation in conjunction with other actors. Students will engage in interdisciplinary theoretical analysis and employ one or more frameworks to develop a proposal for a project on social change. (By approval only.) 3 hrs. Sem

PSCI0428A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0428A-S18

CRN: 22259

Dictators and Democrats
Please register via IGST 0428A
Dictators and Democrats
In this course we will explore the processes through which charismatic individuals create, use, transform, or circumvent state institutions to seize and maintain political power. We will examine individual, national, and international factors that propel dictators and democrats to leadership positions. We will also look at the historical context and personal circumstances leading to leaders' demise, sometimes resulting in regime change. Cases from Africa, America, Asia, and Europe will help students describe, classify, explain, and predict leadership outcomes (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. Sem.

PSCI0429A-S18

CRN: 22234

Seminar on US Congress
Seminar on the U.S. Congress
The U.S. Congress is the most powerful political institution in the nation, and one of the least popular. To understand why, this course examines theories of representation and how they relate to the contemporary Congress; the historical development and institutionalization of the Congress; the roles of parties, candidates, media, and money in Congressional elections; the legislative process, including roles of committees, interest groups, parties, congressional leaders, and presidents; the impact of representational and policy-making processes on the nature of legislation enacted by Congress; and Congress in comparative perspective. (Open to junior and senior majors) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0432A-S18

CRN: 22486

World Trading System
The World Trading System
In this course we will examine the multilateral attempts to have more open, equitable, and predictable trade across borders.  We will focus on principles of non-discrimination through most-favored-nation (MFN) and national treatment, and trade remedies such as antidumping, countervailing duties, and safeguards.  Students will be exposed to debates about free and fair trade, preferential trading agreements, recourse to dispute settlement, and the varied challenges that economies at various stages of development face as they trade with each other.  Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, economics, and international trade law. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0304 or PSCI 0340) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0452A-S18

CRN: 21756

Global Environmental Justice
Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0465A-S18

CRN: 22298

City Politics
City Politics
Cities have always been central to political life in the United States, but scholars disagree over how power is distributed in cities, which groups exercise the most authority, how cities relate to their economic and political environments, and whether it is legitimate to view cities as microcosms of state or national politics. We will consider these general debates as we read major works on U.S. urban politics, addressing issues such as racial and ethnic politics, immigration, suburbanization, and cities' positions in the global economy. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0500A-S18

CRN: 20119

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-S18

CRN: 20122

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500C-S18

CRN: 20812

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-S18

CRN: 20134

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-S18

CRN: 20136

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-S18

CRN: 20138

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-S18

CRN: 20813

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-S18

CRN: 20142

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-S18

CRN: 20504

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-S18

CRN: 21280

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-S18

CRN: 20633

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500Q-S18

CRN: 20634

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-S18

CRN: 21059

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-S18

CRN: 21101

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500X-S18

CRN: 21496

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-S18

CRN: 20143

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-S18

CRN: 20145

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700C-S18

CRN: 20814

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-S18

CRN: 20147

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-S18

CRN: 20148

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-S18

CRN: 20150

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-S18

CRN: 20156

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-S18

CRN: 20157

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-S18

CRN: 20637

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-S18

CRN: 21119

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-S18

CRN: 20638

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700Q-S18

CRN: 20639

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-S18

CRN: 21061

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-S18

CRN: 21102

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700X-S18

CRN: 21528

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)