Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSCI 0101 - Intro to Political Philosophy      

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

EUR PHL SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0102 - American Political Regime      

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0103 - Intro to Comparative Politics      

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

CMP SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0104 - Intro to American Politics      

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0107 - Politics & Studies of Politics      

Politics and the Studies of Politics
This course will consider classic texts of Western political thought. The aims of the course are to see what each of the texts says about politics, and to determine the modes of thought of the text. For example, we will pay close attention both to the substance of Aristotle's political science and to the manner in which he conducts his inquiry. Other works may include Thomas Aquinas, Summae; William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan; Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America; speeches by Thomas Macaulay; and writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0109 - International Politics      

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0202 - African Politics      

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0204 - Left, Right, and Center      

Left, Right, and Center
In this course, we shall examine liberalism, conservatism, socialism and their competing conceptions of freedom, equality, the individual, and community. We shall consider the origins of these ideologies in early modern political theory and shall afford special attention to the connection between thought and politics. Authors may include John Locke, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, John Rawls, Michel Foucault, Michael Oakeshott, and Friedrich Hayek. 3 hrs. lect. (Political Theory)

EUR PHL SOC

Fall 2013

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PSCI 0206 - American Presidency      

The American Presidency
This course examines the development and modern practice of presidential leadership. Focus is on presidential decision-making, changes in the structure of the presidency as an institution, differences among individual presidents, and the interaction of the president with other major actors, including national governing institutions (executive branch, Congress, courts), interest groups, media, and the public. The course includes an historical overview of the evolution of the presidency, and examines changes in the electoral process. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012

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PSCI 0208 - Politics of US Congress      

The Politics of the U.S. Congress
Introduces students to the analysis of Congress and congressional policy-making. Considers how congressional elections, institutions, and policy hang together roughly in equilibrium. Focuses on the internal organization of Congress-committees, parties, House and Senate leadership, rules and norms, and congressional staff. Analyzes the power of Congress relative to the president, the bureaucracy, and the courts, specifically in the policy process. Investigates how unified and divided party control of the government affects legislation in the House and Senate. Finally, applies congressional theories to determine the fates of specific policy proposals in Congress. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR

Fall 2010, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0209 - Local Green Politics      

Local Green Politics
How do local communities manage natural resources throughout the world? How do they avoid natural resource degradation, and how do they interact with environmental decision makers from other levels of authority? Through case studies in wildlife and forest conservation, ecotourism, protected area management, and environmental and conservation planning, we will study community-based natural resource management efforts. Case studies – from ancient times to present – will be drawn from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. By the end of the course, students will be expected to critically analyze cases of resource management and mismanagement. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2013

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PSCI 0211 - Conservation and Env Policy      

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0212 - Comp Environmental Politics      

Comparative Environmental Politics
The nation-state is confronted with both internal and external demands on its ability to manage environmental problems, and these challenges take many forms. For example, international treaties have to be effectively translated into domestic policy; environmental problems that may be considered "local" are often exacerbated by international phenomena; the ability of domestic populations to bring environmental problems to the policy agenda is influenced by state-society relationships; and state environmental agencies often have jurisdictional conflicts with vested interests. In this course we will examine such environmental issues in several countries, including Brazil, Indonesia, and Egypt in order to compare the effects of different political systems on natural resource management. 3 hrs. lect.(Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013

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PSCI 0214 - Intl Environmental Politics      

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0215 - Fed. State & Local Politics      

Federalism, State and Local Politics
What are the unique political opportunities and constraints facing state and local governments? How have these changed over time? In this course we examine the relationships between different levels of government in the U.S. federal system, considering the particular tasks and dilemmas facing states and cities, and scrutinizing the complex interactions between governments that characterize federalism in the United States. Topics include local political culture, intergovernmental grants, state parties, and state political economy. Vermont, New York, and California will receive special scrutiny. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0217 - Politics of M. East & N.Africa      

Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
This course is an introduction to important themes, concepts, and cases in the study of Middle Eastern and North African politics. We will examine key political issues in the region, focusing primarily on developments since World War II and issues of relevance to the region today. For the purposes of this course, the region is defined as the countries of the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran. The first half of the course introduces major themes in Middle Eastern politics. These include state development, nationalism, revolution, authoritarian rule, the petro-state, the Arab-Israeli conflict, conflicts in the Persian Gulf, civil conflict, the rise of Islamism, and attempts at liberal reform. The second half of the course examines how these themes have affected political development in a number of key cases. Primary cases include Egypt, Israel, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq. Students will have the opportunity to individually assess other countries of personal interest in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0221 - Contemporary Chinese Politics      

Contemporary Chinese Politics
This introductory course provides students with a background on major political events in modern China beginning with the end of the Qing dynasty, and then investigates the major political issues in China today-—civil society activity, problems and benefits associated with deepening economic liberalization, and discourse from within the CCP on political reform. This course focuses first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. Course readings range from selections by Marx and Lenin to recent works in political science and sociology on the transformation of state and society under Communist Party rule. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0225 - West European Politics      

West European Politics
An introduction to the domestic politics of Western Europe since 1945, focusing on Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the European Union. Topics include representation, the role of the state in promoting economic growth, social capital and democratic performance, transitions to democracy, and the welfare state. The second half of the course will focus on issues high on the current European agenda, including unemployment, economic reform, the rise of far-right parties and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2012

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PSCI 0227 - Soviet & Russian Politics      

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0228 - Central/East European Politics      

Central and East European Politics
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0232 - Diversity Politics in Europe      

The Politics of Diversity in Western Europe
Contrary to common perceptions, most West European populations are no longer overwhelmingly white and Christian. The new diversity prompted by post-World War II immigration has generated opportunities and challenges for European societies. In this course, we will examine how ethnic diversity is affecting contemporary West European politics. We will cover the topics of citizenship, immigration, immigrant integration, the rise of far right parties, and state policies toward Europe's new ethnically, racially, and religiously diverse societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR SOC

Spring 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0234 - Religion and Politics      

Religion & Politics: Ancient & Modern
What role should religion play in politics? And what is the proper role of the state in regulating religion? Is religious conviction a precondition of or threat to healthy civic life? Why should regimes prefer religious toleration to religious uniformity? In this course we will examine these and other questions at the intersection of religion and politics in the western political tradition, affording special attention to early modern debates over the separation of church and state, toleration, and civil religion. Authors will include Plato, Emperor Julian, Augustine, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bayle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Lessing, and Tocqueville. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC

Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0235 - Ethics & War      

Ethics and War
This course examines the problem of ethics and war from a variety of historical, cultural, and philosophical perspectives, including the theories of violence and its role in human society, the history of warfare, and the experience of battle. We then turn to some of the classical theories of "just war" and the rules of war, and look at the evolution of the international law of war. Finally, we apply the theories discussed to contemporary issues, such as humanitarian intervention, new technologies, sanctions, and post-conflict resolution. Contemporary cases have included the Gulf War, Rwanda, Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan. Readings include John Keegan's The History of War, Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars, J. Glenn Gray's The Warriors, J. T. Johnson's Morality and Contemporary Warfare, and S. Hoffmann's Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

SOC

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0236 - International Law      

International Law
In this course, we will study the function and operation of international law in international politics. We will begin by comparing the approaches of political scientists and lawyers, scholars and practitioners, and judges and politicians. Next, we will examine several of the most prevalent international legal mechanisms that exist today, including the International Court of Justice, International Criminal Court, and the World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement Body. We will then study several of the major areas of international law, including treaties, human rights, and the use of force. Our course will culminate with a mock trial, a recapitulation of the Nuremberg Trials. (PSCI 0109 or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

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PSCI 0240 - Comp Pol of Ethnic Diversity      

Race Around the World: The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Diversity
This course aims to promote reflection on the interactions between the state and ethnic and racially diverse societies. We will examine the political development of concepts of race and racism and address topics such as slave emancipation, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, and decolonization, as well as contemporary issues such as affirmative action, hate crimes, and Islamophobia. We will draw on readings and case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0242 - International Politics and WMD      

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. This course includes a required field trip to the Middlebury in DC offices during spring break. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0245 - Power & Powerlessness      

Power and Powerlessness
This course introduces students to the field of political theory through the study of the concepts of power, authority, and powerlessness. We study a wide range of theories and case studies on the origins and use of various types of power: political, institutional, cultural, personal, and religious. We study the difference between power and authority, how legitimacy is achieved and enacted, and how various "powerless" groups and individuals behave, react, and rebel. Readings include selections from the Bible, Thucydides, Hobbes, Luther, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Foucault, J. Gaventa, and H. Arendt. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PHL SOC

Spring 2011

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PSCI 0250 - Intl Diplomacy and Mod. S Asia      

International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to IGST 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0251 - Identity/Conflict South Asia      

Identity and Conflict in South Asia
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0258 - Pols Intl Humanitarian Action      

The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0260 - Pol Economy Drug Trafficking      

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL CMP CW SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0262 - Might and Right Among Nations      

Might and Right Among Nations
What role does justice play in international politics? What role should it play? Does it pay to act justly in the conduct of foreign affairs? In this course, we will examine the place of ethical considerations in international politics. Drawing upon major works of political theory, we will pay special attention to the relationship between justice and necessity, the ethics of war and deception, and plans for perpetual peace. Authors will include Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Kant, Weber, Woodrow Wilson, and Michael Walzer. 3 hrs. lect. (Political Theory)

EUR PHL

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0278 - Politics of Insurgency      

The Politics of Insurgency
In this course we will survey the full range of insurgencies, from violent civil wars and classic insurgencies to strategically nonviolent movements. Drawing from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, this class will work to analyze an array of research questions on why insurgencies begin, endure, and terminate. We will also consider the efficacy of different resistance methods, the role of the international community, and the impact of insurgency on post-conflict outcomes. Students will synthesize course content in a professional research analysis that provides policy prescriptions for ongoing conflicts throughout the world. (PSCI 0103 or 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0280 - Politics of Policy Innovation      

The Politics of Policy Innovation
Why do policymakers engage in policy innovation and experimentation? In this course we will explore the incentive structure facing policymakers to understand why they create new policies even if the outcome of experimentation is uncertain and perhaps risky. We will examine case studies from around the world, including countries at different levels of development and different regime types, to understand the conditions under which policymakers innovate. Finally, in this course, we will analyze the effectiveness of policy innovation and experimentation in generating positive outcomes such as economic growth and social welfare. 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2014

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PSCI 0288 - Love and Friendship      

Love and Friendship in Literature and Philosophy
Love and friendship are important topics for understanding the best human life and its relationship to the best regime. We will study Plato’s Phaedrus and Symposium; Aristotle’s Ethics; essays on friendship by Montagne and Bacon; Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and another play; Rousseau’s Emile; a Jane Austen novel, and Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. We will also watch two movies: The Philadelphia Story and Anna Karenina. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1030) (Political Theory)/

EUR LIT PHL

Winter 2015

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PSCI 0290 - Social Unrest in Asia      

Social Unrest in Asia
In this course we will compare protest, social mobilization, and contentious politics across Asia. While some have argued that "Asian values" cause harmonious and stable political systems, we will start from the premise that contentious politics in the region reflect the same dynamics seen elsewhere throughout history. However, as with all countries, the specific institutional and cultural context often shapes particular forms of contention. Empirically, we will focus on key regions including East and Southeast Asia as well as the domestic and international dimensions of activism. (PSCI 0103 or PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2013

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PSCI 0292 - Political Communication      

Political Communication
How are media and communications technology re-shaping politics? From a global comparative perspective—ranging from the United States to the Middle East and to Asia—this course will survey the historical development of communications, the role of media in shaping public opinion and behavior, the impact of new media, and the rise of transnational satellite TV. Conceptually, the course will assess the importance of communications for understanding authoritarianism, democracy, and foreign policy. We will develop general comparative frameworks for understanding the growing importance of communications in the information age, while clarifying the limitations of media for shaping polities. (This course is not open to students who have taken PSCI 0413) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2014

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PSCI 0303 - US-Latin American Relations      

U.S.-Latin American Relations
This course examines American foreign policy toward Latin America. Grounded in international relations theory, it chronicles the expansion of U.S. power in the nineteenth century, the interwar period, the Cold War, and the current era of continental economic integration. To ensure rigorous analysis the course sets theoretical concepts against specific case studies. Topics include the Inter-American System, specific doctrines (Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary), specific policies (Good Neighbor Policy, Alliance for Progress), and milestone events in U.S.-Latin American relations, including the Cuban missile crisis, Falkland Islands War, and North American Free Trade Agreement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0304 - Internatl Political Economy      

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0305 - American Constitutional Law      

American Constitutional Law: The Federal System
This course examines the development of American constitutionalism through study of Supreme Court decisions. Every major topic but the bill of rights (see PSCI 0306) is covered. Using the Sullivan and Gunther Constitutional Law casebook, we begin with judicial review and then study the development of legal doctrines surrounding the commerce clause, the due process and equal protection clauses of the fourteenth amendment, and the separation of powers. Recent cases focus on affirmative action and federal protection of civil rights. Interpretive books and essays are considered, as time permits. A mock court exercise is anticipated. (Juniors and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0306) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0306 - American Constitutional Law      

American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Lawis the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR PHL

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0307 - Politics of Virtual Realities      

The Politics of Virtual Realities
How has technology changed our politics? Are those changes all for the good? In this course we will explore the political, legal, and normative implications of the Internet for liberal democracy. We start with the US Constitution and explore arguments that it cannot by itself prevent the Internet from becoming a domain of manipulation rather than of freedom. How can we uphold the ideals of liberty and equality? And, since cyberspace has no country, whose laws should govern it? Cases will include President Obama's campaign and governance strategies, Google's activities abroad, cybersecurity, virtual war, and the WikiLeaks controversy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CW SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0308 - U.S. National Elections      

U. S. National Elections
In this course we will analyze national elections in the United States. Topics covered will include party systems, electoral realignment, voting behavior and turnout, candidate strategy, the nomination process, the legal framework for elections, the Electoral College, gender, race and ethnicity, the media, the Internet, and U.S. elections in comparative perspective. Although the focus will be on the upcoming congressional and presidential contests, earlier elections will be studied for insight into continuity and change in American electoral politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)

NOR SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0310 - American Public Policy      

American Public Policy
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0311 - American Foreign Policy      

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

NOR SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0312 - Bureaucracy      

Bureaucracy
How did 9-11 happen? Why did the U.S. believe Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction? What went wrong with relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina? Answering these questions requires an understanding of bureaucracies in the American political context -- the subject of this course. It begins with an overview of the nature of bureaucracies and theories for their formation, followed by an examination of bureaucratic actors (managers, operators, and executives) and the context within which they work. It concludes with an attempt to assess bureaucratic effectiveness. Case studies of particular bureaucracies, including those involved in the War on Terror, Iraq and Hurricane Katrina, are included to sharpen analyses. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0317 - Ancient & Med. Pol. Philosophy      

Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy
We will study some classic works in ancient and medieval political philosophy: Plato (Laws, Republic); Aristotle (Ethics, Politics); Cicero (Republic, Laws), Maimonides (Guide to the Perplexed), Aquinas (Summa Theologica, Summa Contra Gentiles), Alfarabi (The Political Regime). (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PHL SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0318 - Modern Political Philosophy      

Modern Political Philosophy
In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon
(Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise);
Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws);
Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche
(Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology).
We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom ofspeech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0320 - American Pol Development      

American Political Development
This course will trace the development of the American political system from its founding through the present. We will pay special attention to the response of the governing system to crucial events in American History, such as the Civil War, the rise of industrialism, and the New Deal. Among the topics explored will be the growth in size and power of the federal executive branch and the rise in importance of interest groups in American politics. This course will be taught in a seminar format. (One course in American politics or American history) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2012

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PSCI 0321 - Anglo vs. Franco Africa      

Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP

Spring 2014

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PSCI 0322 - War and Peace      

War and Peace
What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0324 - Pol Development Western Europe      

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP CW EUR SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0330 - Comp Development Strategies      

Comparative Development Strategies
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? What do we mean by "development?" How can governments help or hinder development prospects? These broad questions are addressed by analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. The course focuses particularly on what governments have done to try to accelerate the development process. To gain a historical perspective, the course begins with a brief consideration of the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how difference countries have confronted the dilemmas of development of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0333 - Politics Phi & Education      

Politics, Philosophy, and Education
We will explore the nature of these three activities and the relations among them. The course could be said to be an extended commentary on Socrates' claim that education is turning the soul toward being; Aristotle's distinction between theoretical and practical knowledge; and Marx's claim that philosophers have only interpreted the world, but the point is to change it. We will ask what is liberal education and what is its business with political things. We will read Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Nietzsche, and some 20th century writers, including Michael Oakeshott, Allan Bloom, and Leo Strauss. Seniors needing to fulfill a political science seminar requirement may arrange with the instructor to do so. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0335 - Latin American Revolutions      

Latin American Revolutions
This course examines the causes, goals, and outcomes of revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America, with special reference to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela, Chile, and Nicaragua. It seeks to understand (1) why this region has experienced multiple revolutions; (2) what their political, economic, or social impact has been; (3) why revolutions produced authoritarian, socialist, dictatorial, or democratic outcomes across countries; and (4) what factors have kept revolutionaries from achieving their political, social, or economic goals. Evaluation entails rigorous application of theory to in-depth case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0336 - Political Econ of Development      

The Political Economy of Development
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder the development process? In this course we will address these broad questions by analyzing the development of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain a historical perspective we will begin with the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development, such as corruption, income inequality, and environmental degradation. By studying development through a political economy lens, we will present the intersections between a political and economic understanding of the complex process of development. (Not open to students who have taken PSCI/ECON 1027) (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2012

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PSCI 0337 - Democ/Develop/Globalization      

Democracy, Development, and Globalization
In this course we will address crucial issues that both economists and political scientists have considered fundamental to their disciplines: how nations become democratic, develop economically, and confront globalization and regionalism. We will focus on theories that come from various disciplines to explain these phenomena. Following several weeks of theoretical discussion, we will focus on case studies from Latin America, Europe, Russia, Eastern Europe, and China. Our approach will focus on integrating various disciplines to understand these inherently interdisciplinary issues. Students will be expected to write research papers that will utilize foreign language sources, as appropriate. This course is equivalent to ECON 0337 and IGST 0337. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2013

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PSCI 0340 - Intl. Order & Organization      

International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

CMP SOC

Fall 2014

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PSCI 0344 - Race, Sex, & the Constitution      

Race, Sex, and the Constitution
In this course we will examine how courts in America have framed and decided cases involving sex and race. We will consider issues such as sex discrimination, birth control and abortion, and sexual orientation, as well as the Court's doctrine concerning heightened levels of scrutiny for suspect classifications and fundamental rights. Course readings will consist of Supreme Court decisions, relevant state supreme court and lower federal court decisions on same sex marriage, and scholarly commentary. We will examine both the legitimacy and the efficacy of judicial power in these areas. Seniors needing to fulfill a political science seminar requirement may arrange with the instructor to do so. (PSCI 0102) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0349 - Intl Politics of Middle Easst      

International Politics of the Middle East
In this course we will study the evolution of the inter-state system in the Middle East. Using contemporary International Relations (IR) theories we will examine the influence of great powers, regional states, transnational movements, and regional organizations on state interests, ideology, religion, and the region's political economy. Questions to be addressed will include: which levels of analyses are most helpful in understanding the complexity of Middle East politics? Which of the IR theories--realist, liberal, or constructivist-- best explain inter-state relations in the region? What other approaches may be useful in this endeavor? 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2015

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PSCI 0350 - Franco-American Relations      

Franco-American Relations
In this course we will examine the complexity of Franco-American relations by focusing on recent as well as past issues of contention between the two partners. We will examine the impact of history, political culture, and national interest in defining clashing world visions. We will also reflect on the future of Franco-American relations based on the role of France in an enlarged and more closely integrated European Union. 3 hrs. lec./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP EUR SOC

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0351 - Presidents of Fifth Republic      

Presidents of the Fifth Republic
In this course we will examine presidential power in France's Fifth Republic, introduced in 1958. We will study the seven presidents of the Fifth Republic - Charles de Gaulle, Georges Pompidou, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy, and the current president François Hollande - through memoirs, speeches, research monographs, journal articles, and biographies. We will focus on the content of their domestic and foreign policies as well as their leadership strategies and visions for France in a comparative perspective. (This course will be taught in French; FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. and film screenings. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR LNG SOC

Spring 2014

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PSCI 0353 - French Foreign Policy      

French Foreign Policy
In this course we will focus on the foreign policy of Fifth Republic France (1958-Present). In the first part, we will study the role of Charles de Gaulle in defining the place of France in the world after the liberation and in establishing the major tenets of French foreign policy. In the second part, we will examine the evolution of French foreign policy by focusing on three main themes: (1) the relationship of France with its former colonies; (2) transatlantic relations; and (3) European integration. (FREN 0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lec./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

EUR SOC

Spring 2012

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PSCI 0368 - Frontiers in Political Science      

Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

DED SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0372 - Gender and Int'l Relations      

Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2014

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PSCI 0378 - Civil Conflict Afr/Mid East      

Civil Conflict in Africa and the Middle East
In this course we will examine the sources of civil conflict by investigating prominent cases of civil conflict and civil war in Africa and the Middle East, broadly defined. Major theories of political and ethnic conflict are introduced and applied to specific cases, including South Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Algeria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Students will have the opportunity to make arguments about the causes and solutions to violent conflict, as well as individually examine a case study of their choice in the region. (PSCI 0103) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

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PSCI 0380 - Int'l Relations of East Asia      

International Relations of East Asia
Although the power of East Asian states makes the region central to US foreign policy and the study of international politics in general, most international relations theorists rely heavily upon European history and case studies. In this course, we will explore IR theory and East Asian politics in an attempt to enrich both. We will review major events in East Asia, explore advanced theoretical readings and their applications to the region, and finally, use these theories to understand issues like energy security, territorial disputes, and prospects for democratic development. (PSCI 0109) (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect/disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Fall 2012

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PSCI 0390 - Env Negotiation/Dispute Res      

Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of environmental negotiation and dispute resolution as applied to public policy at both the domestic and international levels. We will consider the mutual gains approach to negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and dispute systems design. We will grapple with challenging features typical of environmental negotiations, such as the large number of stakeholders involved, scientific uncertainty, and value differences. We will undertake role-playing simulations. Throughout, we will think critically about the negotiating styles and assumptions employed by both seminar participants and those presented in course materials. (Junior or Senior standing; Sophomores by approval; ENVS 0211 or IGST 0101 or PSCI 0109). 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0392 - Insurgency and Security Policy      

Insurgency and Security Policy
In the post-Cold War era insurgency has become the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns. Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency will allow students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat the emergent non-state threats of the twenty-first century. How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological, and geographical conditions? What are the implications of insurgency for international intervention and homeland security policy? This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective. 4 hrs. lect./disc.

SOC

Spring 2015

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PSCI 0401 - Mod & Post-Modern Pol Thought      

Modern and Post-Modern Political Thought
This course examines one of the central dilemmas of modern and post-modern political theory: the sense that the Enlightenment project has come to an end, and the need to establish a "new," more fitting, conception of human beings in the world. Readings include Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground; Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals, and Zarathustra; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, and some of Heidegger's later essays, including "The Question Concerning Technology," "Letter on Humanism," and "The Essence of Truth." Previous courses in philosophy or political philosophy highly recommended. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0107) 3 hrs. sem. (Political Theory)/

EUR

Fall 2011

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PSCI 0403 - India and China Compared      

India and China: 21st Century Superpowers?
In this course we will look at recent political and economic developments in India and China. We will examine the economic rise of India and China in contrast to their earlier economic stagnation. We will contrast political evolution into India's democracy and China's one-party autocracy, and we will study relations between the two states and their relations with the U.S. and the world. This course is equivalent to IGST 0403. (PSCI 0103 or waiver) 3 hrs. seminar (Comparative Politics)

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013

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PSCI 0404 - Jihad Vs. McWorld      

Jihad vs. McWorld
In the new millennium, we may all be part of a global market economy, but can we live in a global market society? This seminar examines two major forces shaping the world today. One is “McWorld,” a homogenizing global trend resulting from modern technology, communications, and an increasingly interdependent capitalist world economy. The other is “Jihad,” a resurgence of ethnic politics, fundamentalist religious movements, and the “politics of identity.” We will analyze the origins, development, and interaction of these two seemingly contradictory trends through case studies from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0404. (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0405 - Causes of War      

War remains humankind’s most virulent and deadly social disease. In this seminar we will examine what we know about war's causes, and what might be done about its prevention. We will view the problem of war from several perspectives, including the perceptions and beliefs of national leaders, the attributes of states, the relationships and interactions of rival states, the international political environment, and terrorist networks. We will examine the writings of participants and theorists, as well as contemporary social science research. Each student will complete a case study of the origins of a specific international or civil war, or prepare the research design for an empirical study. (PSCI 0311 or by waiver; open to INTL and PSCI majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Spring 2012

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PSCI 0409 - Seminar Political Philosophy      

Seminar on Political Philosophy
In this course we will consider two ancient philosophers (Plato and Aristotle) and two recent philosophers (Oakeshott and Strauss) who have thought about politics. Their subjects include: what is philosophy; what is political philosophy; and what are the occasion and purpose of them? Further, we will study what these writers about politics say about other subjects such as friendship, divinity, poetry, the whole, and education. (PSCI 0101 or 0107 or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (Political theory)

PHL

Fall 2011

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PSCI 0410 - Statesmanship & Modern Liberty      

Statesmanship and Modern Liberty: Montesquieu and Tocqueville
Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws and Tocqueville's Democracy in America offer profound treatments of modern representative government, its promise, and its perils. In this course we will focus on each author's understanding of the often neglected role of statesmanship in shaping political and cultural conditions favorable to the emergence and preservation of human liberty in the modern world. We will consider key themes such as the relationship between liberty and equality, the role of the passions in politics, the meaning of despotism, the relationship between culture and politics, and the promise and dangers of modern commerce for liberal democracy. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC

Spring 2014

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PSCI 0412 - Diplomacy      

Diplomacy
The practice of diplomacy and the techniques of bargaining, negotiation, and mediation are studied through theoretical works, diplomatic handbooks, memoirs, and studies of historical and contemporary cases. The seminar begins with an examination of a case of classical diplomacy at the Congress of Vienna. It then moves to consider more contemporary examples of negotiation and mediation in interstate crises, peace settlements, and cooperative efforts at problem solving. Each student will complete a case study of a diplomatic event of his or her choice. (PSCI 0109 or 0201 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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PSCI 0413 - Mass Media&Democratization      

Media and Democratization
The news media can either support or undermine non-democratic regimes. This tension between media liberalization and political control is well-captured in Yuezhi Zhao’s book Communication in China: Political Economy, Power and Conflict, which will serve as a thematic anchor for this course. We will examine the impact of print, television, and new media on democratization in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Africa, while drawing from the literature on democratic transitions and the communications literature on media effects. The goal of the course is to understand the causes of press freedom, its role in the erosion of state control, and its implications for the survival of authoritarian regimes. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2012, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0416 - Latin American Pol Development      

Latin American Political Development (in Spanish)
This course will examine the political development of Latin America after independence. Major topics in the course will include: leadership and caudillismo, nationalism and the relationship between Latin America and the outside world, democracy and authoritarianism, revolutionary movements and electoral systems. Readings for the course will draw on the work of Latin American social scientists and novelists, and will also include speeches and writings from Latin American political leaders. A major goal of the course is to build an ability to carry on sophisticated discussion of Latin American politics in Spanish. Most readings will be in Spanish, and all classes will be conducted in Spanish. If there is sufficient student interest, a supplemental discussion in Portuguese will be added. This course will fulfill the advanced language course requirement for International Studies majors. Students may also use the course to receive elective credit in the Spanish department, though it does not fulfill the SPAN senior seminar requirement. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0421 - American Environ Politics      

American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting and interest groups,) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states. Policy case studies will vary from year to year. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0424 - Comparative Democratization      

Seminar on Comparative Democratization
This seminar explores critical issues concerning transitions from authoritarian to democratic rule. It addresses such questions as: What factors account for the "third wave" of global democratic expansion? How do newly democratic societies confront their authoritarian past? Should the new leaders choose presidential or parliamentary government? What challenges confront states that are undergoing simultaneously processes of democratic change and economic transformation? What conditions favor consolidation of new democracies? Can democracy's "third wave" be sustained indefinitely, or will a wave of democratic breakdowns follow? To contend with such questions, we will analyze and compare the experience of many countries and regions. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem.
(Comparative Politics)/

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0425 - American Presidency      

The American Presidency
In-depth examination of the exercise of presidential leadership from a normative and empirical perspective. What are the sources of presidential power, the constraints on its use, and the implications for the American political system? The focus is on the leadership strategies of the modern presidents (FDR through Obama). (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0206 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0429 - Seminar on US Congress      

Seminar on the U.S. Congress
The U.S. Congress is the most powerful political institution in the nation, and one of the least popular. To understand why, this course examines theories of representation and how they relate to the contemporary Congress; the historical development and institutionalization of the Congress; the roles of parties, candidates, media, and money in Congressional elections; the legislative process, including roles of committees, interest groups, parties, congressional leaders, and presidents; the impact of representational and policy-making processes on the nature of legislation enacted by Congress; and Congress in comparative perspective. (Open to junior and senior majors) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0430 - Pol Econ Global Lat Amer: Mex      

Political Economy of Globalization in Latin America: The Mexican Case
How does globalization affect developing countries? What general lessons might a single country's response to globalization teach? What economic, political, or social consequences arise from embracing or resisting globalization? We will examine such issues by focusing on Mexico, one of Latin America's most dynamic economies and a leading U.S. trade partner. Themes will include the politics of colonialism, revolution, authoritarianism, and democratization; economic modernization and economic/political crises; economic integration, drug trafficking, and immigration. These themes will be set against the backdrop of historic and contemporary globalization, and Mexico's encounters with "core" states in Europe, North America, and international institutions. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Fall 2012

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PSCI 0431 - African Government      

African Government
Sub-Saharan Africa has been described as being in a state of permanent crisis, a place where disorder and chaos reign and states are chronically weak. How do political systems form and thrive under such conditions? What accounts for their survival in the face of tremendous political, economic, and environmental challenges? We will investigate the distinctive characteristics of African political systems, the different governance models throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the types of public goods or public ills these systems have produced. We will also have the opportunity to more deeply appreciate the real-life consequences for displaced Africans through a service-learning component. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)

AAL

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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PSCI 0434 - War and Consequences      

War: Causes, Conduct, Consequences
Why do human beings organize themselves in armed groups to attack and kill other human beings? What is it like to experience war, both as a combatant and a non-combatant caught in its vortex? How has warfare evolved over time? Which legal or moral considerations affect how wars are fought? What are the mechanisms of war propaganda? What are the immediate and long-term consequences of war? What is the future of war? These are some of the questions we will try to answer. Readings include works by psychologists, political scientists, historians, philosophers, poets, fiction writers, dramatists, film-makers, and participants. This course is equivalent to IGST 0434. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

EUR SOC

Spring 2014

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PSCI 0437 - Understanding Intervention      

In this seminar we will examine third-party intervention and its effects on conflict. Why do interveners get involved? In what ways do third parties try to manage or influence conflict? We will discuss various types of intervention, including economic sanctions, military assistance, and covert operations. We will then consider how interveners affect the outbreak, duration, and conclusion of conflict. Do interveners make conflict more or less likely to start? Do they shorten or lengthen fighting? How do they affect war outcomes? Case studies of intervention include Bosnia and Kosovo, World War I and World War II, and various Cold War conflicts. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0438 - Political Islam      

Political Islam
In this course we will survey the central questions in studies of political Islam, focusing on the emergence of Islam as a political force in the contemporary period. Discussion will center on the following core topics: (1) the nature of political Islam and Islamic interests; (2) how Islamic political movements develop; (3) why Islamic political movements flourish or fail; (4) how Islamic interests are expressed in the political arena; and (5) what types of political systems are most compatible with politicized Islam? These questions will be addressed by looking at the general history of the contemporary Islamic resurgence and by examining case studies on Egypt, Algeria, Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0449 - Chinese Foreign Policy      

China's grand strategy is "peaceful rise," meaning that soft power is used to accomplish policy goals. In this course we will examine China's foreign policy at three levels. At the neighbor-state level, we will focus on territorial conflicts like Taiwan and Tibet, nuclear proliferation in North Korea, and security alliances between Japan and the US. At the regional level, we will analyze economic and environmental issues involving Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) states. At the international level, we will focus on oil diplomacy and China’s role in the UN. In addition to international factors, we will examine domestic explanations of policy such as legitimacy, culture, and ideology. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2011

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PSCI 0452 - Global Environmental Justice      

Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0454 - Leadership Pol & Personality      

Leadership: Politics and Personality
What difference do leaders make? Are leaders born or made? What accounts for effective leadership? Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies? This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) the individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0455 - Political Economy of Trade      

Political Economy of International Trade
In this course we will examine the political economy of international trade with a focus on economic development and globalization. Emphasis will be placed on the distributional consequences of trade policy, as well as the relationship between trade, international organizations, and international law. Readings will explore the role of international trade in the history of industrialization, theories of development, and contemporary concerns regarding labor rights, the environment, and public health. Students will be encouraged to investigate both new and recurrent distributional issues related to economic growth. The course will assume knowledge of some basic concepts from economics and political science, but no prerequisite coursework is required. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2015

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PSCI 0456 - Int'l Order in the 20th C      

International Order in the 20th Century: Theories and Practice
In this seminar we will study the organization of the international system throughout the 20th century, and evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered: international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international regimes (like the international gold standard). Reading both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives on these mechanisms, we will consider their interaction and assess the degree to which the international system was "ordered" in the most recent century. The course will impart to students greater knowledge of the international system's evolution and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or PSCI 0304 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

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PSCI 0457 - NonState Actors in World Pols      

Nonstate Actors in World Politics
Although the state has traditionally been at the center of the study of international relations, actors outside the state play an increasingly important role in global politics. In this seminar we will explore the theoretical literature on non-state actors, and analyze their "real world" roles and significance in international politics. We will assess a range of non-state actors--terrorist groups, transnational advocacy networks, and multinational corporations--consider the conditions under which they are most influential, and discuss how international relations theory can and should incorporate these groups to better understand our increasingly interconnected world. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or PSCI 0304 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

SOC

Fall 2010

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PSCI 0460 - European Politics Seminar      

Seminar on West European Politics
In this course we will examine various aspects of European politics through the process of directed research projects. Students may cover any aspect of West European politics, such as how countries are responding to the contemporary economic environment, changes in domestic political party systems, the expansion of the European Union, the relationship between states and civil societies, and immigrant integration. Students will write a major research paper on a topic in European politics that they have selected. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

EUR SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0462 - Empire and Political Theory      

Empire and Political Theory
In this course, we will examine empire as an idea and a political form. Drawing upon works by major political theorists, we will pose a range of questions raised by the phenomenon of empire. What is empire? Why does it arise? Does it find root in some element of human nature or the nature of political communities? Can empire be justified? Can democratic and liberal regimes be imperialistic? If so, are they inherently so? What about the US or the EU? Authors will include Herodotus, Plutarch, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Vitoria, Locke, Burke, Mill, Tocqueville, and Hobson. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107) 3 hrs. sem. (Political Theory)

EUR HIS PHL

Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0465 - City Politics      

City Politics
Cities have always been central to political life in the United States, but scholars disagree over how power is distributed in cities, which groups exercise the most authority, how cities relate to their economic and political environments, and whether it is legitimate to view cities as microcosms of state or national politics. We will consider these general debates as we read major works on U.S. urban politics, addressing issues such as racial and ethnic politics, immigration, suburbanization, and cities' positions in the global economy. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

Spring 2012

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PSCI 0470 - Race and Ethnic Politics      

Race and Ethnic Politics
This seminar is designed to build upon students' own interests, as each participant will write a 30-35 page research paper on a topic in race and ethnic politics that they have selected, drawing on any time period, country, or region of the world. We will discuss how to craft a research paper and will collectively workshop student papers-in-progress. This course will be of particular interest to seniors wishing to engage in a capstone project, or to juniors exploring a potential senior thesis topic. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

SOC

Spring 2013

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PSCI 0482 - Public/Private Governance      

Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. The final research projects will require research in a language other than English. This course is equivalent to IGST 0482. International Relations

CMP SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0483 - Rise of Asia and U.S. Policy      

The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to IGST 0483. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PSCI 0484 - Political Econ of Regionalism      

The Political Economy of Regionalism *
In this course we will address the political economy of regionalism in a variety of national and regional contexts. We will consider both integration projects—such as the European Union and South America’s Mercosur—as well as subnational local autonomy movements, such as those in Catalonia and Scotland. We will study theories of integration as well as case studies from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, focusing on the political and economic forces driving both integration and disintegration in their historical and contemporary contexts. We will also consider how globalization affects regional integration projects. /(Comparative Politics)/ 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2014

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PSCI 0495 - Money and Politics      

Money and Politics
Observers and political activists have long fought over how to best reconcile the existence of capitalism, with its necessary inequalities, and the principles of a democratic republic, which postulates equality with respect to rights. In this seminar, we consider what political science can teach us about the relationship between money and politics, and how best to assess the normative consequences of this interaction. 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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PSCI 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0700 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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PSCI 1003 - Euro-Atlantic Relations      

Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we will examine the history, current condition and prospective future of US-European relations, focusing primarily on transatlantic security aspects but with reference to political and economic contexts and bilateral ties. The learning process will include lectures, class discussions, guest speakers, a role-playing exercise, and a final policy options paper. Issues covered include: persistent and changing aspects of the “transatlantic bargain;” the Ukraine crisis and relations with Russia; NATO enlargement issues; impact of 9/11 and the Iraq crisis; NATO’s role in Afghanistan; US-European relations under the Obama administration; relations between NATO, the European Union and the UN; alternative futures for transatlantic relations. (This course counts as an elective towards the major in Political Science). (International Relations and Foreign Policy).

CMP EUR SOC WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2013, Winter 2015

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PSCI 1009 - Public Opinion in US Politics      

Public Opinion in American Politics
In this course we will explore the subject of public opinion in American politics. We will read major political science works on the sources of Americans’ political attitudes and learn how political scientists analyze public opinion through major datasets such as the National Election Studies (NES). No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary to take this course, but students should be prepared to learn about and make use of statistical concepts, techniques, and computer software.

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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PSCI 1010 - Same Sex Marriage and the Law      

Same Sex Marriage and Law
What are, or should be, the constitutional rights of same sex couples in the United States? The United States Supreme Court has struck down laws criminally punishing homosexual acts and it has held marriage to be a fundamental right, but it has not struck down traditional marriage laws. After a decade in which state courts have grappled with the subject under state constitutional law, celebrity lawyers Ted Olsen and David Boies have persuaded plaintiffs in California to make a "federal case out of it.” We will study same sex marriage from the perspectives of philosophy and law.

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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PSCI 1016 - Dictators and Democrats      

Dictators and Democrats
How do dictators come into and stay in power? Why and how do they relinquish control of their nation and government? What distinguishes democrats from dictators? This course explores the processes through which charismatic individuals create, transform, or circumvent state institutions to seize and/or maintain political power. We will examine individual, national, and international factors that propel dictators to leadership positions. We will also look at the historical context and personal circumstances that lead to a dictators' demise, and that sometimes result in the establishment of a democratic regime. We will study cases from Europe (Churchill, Hitler, Atatürk, Milosevic), Asia (Ghandi, Mao, Pol Pot, Stalin), America (FDR, Clinton, G. W. Bush, Pinochet, Perón, Duvalier), and Africa (Mandela, Mobutu, Idi Amin, Mugabe). (Comparative Politics)

AAL CMP SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1019 - War Games      

War Games
Why do wars happen? Social interactions often follow basic patterns whether the individuals in question are negotiating minor issues, like prices at a farmer’s market, or major issues, like the terms of settlement in war. We are familiar with many of these in the form of children’s games or games of strategy. In this course we will connect these games to broader non-cooperative interactions, particularly to wars between and within nations. While not a course on tactical behaviors, this course is an exploration of strategic behaviors (bargaining, bluffing, and learning) that lead nations into very costly conflicts. (International Relations)

SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1020 - American Power: Use and Abuse      

American Power: Use and Abuse
The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Libya intervention and the conflicts in Syria have raised important questions about how the United States chooses to use its power on behalf of its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since World War II. Based on selected case studies, we will examine pro and con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with extensive class debate and discussion. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2014

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PSCI 1024 - Charitable Action Home/ Abroad      

Charitable Action at Home & Abroad
What responsibilities do citizens owe their local and global communities? In what ways do people engage in volunteer and philanthropic activities? How do national or local politics influence one’s propensity—and ability—to pursue such work? In this course we will explore the dynamics of charitable action at home and abroad by comparing the cultural norms and institutional arrangements of the charitable sector in four industrialized democracies: the United States, Japan, France, and Britain. Through case studies of both local and national charitable organizations, we will examine the politics of charitable work and gain a practical perspective on the challenges facing charitable organizations and volunteers alike.

CMP SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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PSCI 1025 - Globalization Then and Now      

Globalization: Then and Now
By several measures, the global economy was more fully integrated in 1900 than it is today. Thus, the current march of globalization is neither inevitable nor unprecedented. In this course, we will examine the foreign economic policies of the major powers (particularly the United States and Great Britain) that fostered these two eras of globalization. We will also consider the normative arguments made by both the advocates (Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, and Paul Krugman) and the skeptics (Karl Marx, Alexander Hamilton, and Dani Rodrik) of market integration. We will use this perspective to understand and evaluate current trends in the global economy. (Prior experience in economics and/or political science recommended.) This course counts as elective credit towards the Political Science major. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

HIS SOC WTR

Winter 2012

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PSCI 1026 - Advising the President      

Advising the President
In this course we will examine several key presidential decisions in American history from the perspective of presidential advisers using a formal modeling approach. After a general introduction to the structure and process of presidential decision making, students will participate in role-playing simulations designed to recreate the circumstances in each historical case.

DED NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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PSCI 1027 - Political Econ of Development      

The Political Economy of Development
In this course we will take an economic and political perspective in examining some of the most significant current questions in the field of development. Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder development prospects? These broad questions will be addressed by analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain historical perspective, we will study selected theories of development and the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development such as poverty, inequality, and corruption.

AAL SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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PSCI 1029 - VT Government & Politics      

Vermont Government and Politics
Vermont is the second smallest state in America. Its state government is similarly small and accessible. How does it work? Does it work well? Are there lessons for other states that haven't fared as well during the recent economic downturn? Are there lessons Vermont can learn from other states? This course will offer an insider's perspective on the political landscape and governmental system of our host state. We will learn about the state's political history, meet with those involved in the process, and discuss the intricacies of state government and how the political system affects it. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014, Winter 2015

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PSCI 1030 - Comparative Political Behavior      

Comparative Political Behavior
In this course we will examine the role played by the masses in politics. We will explore public opinion, voting behavior, and other forms of political participation in a variety of contexts ranging from established democracies in Western Europe, to new democracies in the former USSR, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The primary goals of this course are to gain an understanding of the salient parts of the scholarly debate on political participation, and to analyze the factors that motivate citizens to participate in political life. (Comparative Politics)/

SOC WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2014

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PSCI 1031 - Protest Music-Comparative      

Protest Music in Comparative Perspective
In this course we will examine how marginalized populations around the world use music to interpret, explain, and respond to political, racial, socioeconomic, and gendered inequities. Because music is produced for a wide audience, it is important for the construction of group identity and a useful means of protest. We will discuss the domestic politics of countries such as Nigeria, Jamaica, the U.S., and Brazil by reading the literature of comparative politics, sociology, and critical race and gender theory. Our discussion of these topics will help us better understand how power in various forms is used to repress, and how music challenges existing hegemonies. (Comparative Politics)

AAL ART CMP SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1032 - Philosophy & Politics      

Plurality: Philosophy and Politics from Plato to Arendt
Western philosophy insists that by thinking alone we can better learn to live together. Yet starting with Plato's description of the philosopher who must be forced back to society after ascending to the realm of ideas, this tradition often finds itself caught between individual reflection as a means of overcoming common prejudices and the need to find meaning in a common world. In this course we will explore questions of justice, liberty, and authority in Ancient Greek and Enlightenment texts before turning to the early 20th century forms of existentialism that, in their intense focus on individual experience, provide Hannah Arendt with surprising resources for conceptualizing humans as fundamentally plural beings who are both equal and distinct. (This course counts as elective credit towards the Political Science major) (Political Theory)

EUR PHL WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1033 - Reading Adam Smith      

Reading Adam Smith
In this course we will read Adam Smith’s two great works, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and The Wealth of Nations (1776). Smith’s The Wealth of Nations is known for its elaboration of the principles of liberal capitalism. However, understanding Smith’s full teaching requires a study of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, which contains a full discussion of the human passions, especially sympathy. Both works contain Smith’s famous “invisible hand” metaphor. As both Jefferson and Hamilton admired Smith’s work, and as Americans continue to debate the relationship between politics and economics, we will conclude by considering the application of Smith's principles to America. (Political Theory)

NOR PHL SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1034 - Women in American Politics      

Women in American Politics
In this course, we will cover a wide variety of issues concerning women in American politics, examining a mixture of sources from history, political science, and popular culture. In part one of this course, we will discuss highlights of the history of women in politics in the United States. In parts two and three we will build on this knowledge by exploring how the legacy of women’s political activism affects women in America today: part two addresses women’s political behavior outside of elective office, and part three addresses women in elective office. (This course counts as elective credit towards the major in Political Science and the major in Women's and Gender Studies) (American Politics)

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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PSCI 1035 - Contemporary Political Thought      

Contemporary Political Thought
In this course we will survey political theory in the United States and Europe from 1945 to the present. Students will explore a broad range of topics, including the revival of political philosophy, relativism, rationalism, totalitarianism, contemporary liberal theory, communitarianism, conservatism, multiculturalism, and postmodernism. We will study leading works by some of the twentieth century’s most influential political thinkers. Authors will include Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Michael Oakeshott, Isaiah Berlin, Eric Voegelin, John Rawls, Michael Sandel, Michael Walzer, and Michel Foucault. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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PSCI 1036 - Afghan Law and Politics      

Afghan Legal and Political History
In this course we will review the political and legal history of Afghanistan from before the first British-Afghan war to the present. We will examine the current sources of Afghan law, and explore the relevance of western law in light of Afghanistan’s historical struggle between the center and the periphery, and its culture of tribal loyalties, warlords, and political patronage. We will also consider the disastrous results of 35 years of war on most aspects of government, including the very idea of the rule of law. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL WTR

Winter 2014

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PSCI 1037 - Political Econ of Euro Crisis      

The Political Economy of the Euro Crisis
In this course we will undertake an in-depth analysis of the current Euro crisis, a complex process that began as a purely economic crisis and turned into a political crisis that is reshaping the “balance of power” within the European Union. After a short introduction to the European monetary system, we will address the main reasons behind the current Euro crisis, paying particular attention to the issue of sovereign debt as a major economic and political problem in Southern Europe. We will then examine the German austerity approach to the crisis and Germany’s attempts to impose policies on the so-called “non-virtuous” Mediterranean nations in this time of crisis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

EUR WTR

Winter 2014

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PSCI 1038 - Thinking Revolution      

Thinking Revolution
The French Revolution brought philosophical ideals of equality and self-government into modern politics with unprecedented force and suddenness. In its violent wake, Enlightenment thinkers fiercely debated the limits of progress, institutional reform, and the relation between human nature and government. We will begin with a consideration of Rousseau’s articulation of the social contract and natural right concepts that explicitly inspired revolutionaries. We will then examine the Burke and Paine debate on the comparative advantages of tradition and abstract rights as the basis of government. Finally, we will compare Hannah Arendt’s account of the French and American revolutions with these earlier authors’ challenges in order to reconceive the relation between thought and action in the form of participatory politics. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL WTR

Winter 2014

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PSCI 1039 - Security Issues in South Asia      

Security Issues in South Asia
In this course we will examine various security matters in South Asia, including interstate conflict, terrorism, and issues related to weapons of mass destruction. South Asia refers to the region encompassing Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. However, given that security matters in Afghanistan are linked closely to Pakistan, this course will include Afghanistan as part of the broader southern Asian region. We will look at topics from the historical, political-economic, and foreign policy perspective. We will discuss various conflicts between countries, including the India-Pakistan dyad, and the reasons behind the wars between them. Cases studies will include Islamist terrorism in the region, and the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. This course will also consider nontraditional security matters such as environmental degradation and refugee movements. (International Relations)/

AAL SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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PSCI 1040 - Diplomacy, War, Social Change      

From One World War to Another: Diplomacy, War, and Social Change, 1918-1948
Traumatic events create great changes. No event in the 20th century was more traumatic than World War II. In this course we will consider the diplomacy that led to the war, determined the conduct of the war, and shaped post-war politics. We will examine what it was like to be engaged in the war on the battlefield and on the home front. Then we will consider the war's effects on future wars, on international law, and on society, including gender and racial relations. We will employ a variety of sources: readings in history and politics, memoirs, poetry, feature films, and documentary videos. (Political Science)

HIS WTR

Winter 2015

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PSCI 1056 - Amer Citizenship/Face of War      

American Citizenship and the Second Face of War
In this course we will examine the domestic political impact of major American wars, from the Civil War through the war on terror. Among the underlying questions driving the course are: How has war affected the concept and content of US citizenship? Of political rights? Must a democracy permit free speech (dissent) and association in times of war? Can it do so safely? Can it afford not to? Can wars fought to protect political liberties and values sometimes actually threaten them? To address these questions the course draws on the founding documents, political history, biographies, Supreme Court cases, and videos. The format includes lectures, student discussion, and writing assignments. This course counts as elective credit towards the Political Science major. (American Politics)/

CW NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2012

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PSCI 1130 - Statistics for Social Sciences      

Statistics for Social Sciences
In this course, which assumes no background in quantitative methods, students will be introduced to the necessary skills to analyze data sets and derive meaningful conclusions and interpretations. We will combine exposition to statistical theory with practical uses of statistical modeling, and we will explore common statistical tools used in both industrial and research environments including STATA and/or R. We will apply the classroom material to real-world data sets in regular lab sessions. We will focus on data and examples from social sciences, but the course will be generally applicable to students of all disciplines. (Political Theory)

DED WTR

Winter 2013

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