John Harpham

Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science

 
 work(802) 443-5752
 fax(802) 443-3216
 Tuesday 3:00 - 4:30, Thursday 3:00 - 4:30 and by appointment
 Munroe Hall 305

The link to my CV appears below, and below that are listed the courses that I teach. Finally, here is a short talk in which I have discussed my work." 

FileHarpham Curriculum Vitae

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSCI 0101 - Intro to Political Philosophy      

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory) EUR PHL SOC

Spring 2018, Fall 2018

More Information »

PSCI 0223 - Populism and Democracy      

Populism and Democracy
Democracy may be government of the people, by the people, for the people. But at times throughout American history, the people (or some segment of them) have believed that their government was not for them. Today we call them populists. They have been at once rooted in the ideals of democracy and critical, even contemptuous, of democratic politics. In this course we will read what populists wrote to see who they were: Antifederalists, Tocqueville, proponents of Jacksonian Democracy, the great Agrarians at the turn of the twentieth century, Jane Addams and Huey P. Long and John Steinbeck, and—inevitably—Trump. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect. AMR HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2018

More Information »

PSCI 0224 - Classical Political Thought      

Tragedy and Order in Classical Political Thought
The world of ancient Athens is at once inescapably remote and enduringly familiar. It is the setting in which the Western tradition of political thought began. As we do today, its greatest authors struggled at once to probe the sources of chaos and tragedy and to imagine in their midst the conditions of lasting political order. In this course we will read closely the Iliad of Homer, the History of Thucydides, selected tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides, the Republic of Plato, and the Politics of Aristotle. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect. EUR PHL SOC

Fall 2017

More Information »

PSCI 0246 - American Slavery & Freedom      

American Slavery, American Freedom
In this course we will explore the antagonism and entanglement of slavery and freedom, the two most powerful ideas in American political thought, with a focus on the period from the Declaration of Independence to the Progressive Era. Readings will draw on a range of genres including, judicial decisions, imaginative literature, presidential addresses, canonical works of political theory. Special emphasis will be placed on the writings of African Americans and on the genre of autobiography, as one in which the classic American negotiation between slavery and freedom is often performed with particular poignancy in the course of an individual life. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect. AMR HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2017

More Information »

PSCI 0446 - American Slavery & Freedom      

American Slavery, American Freedom
In this course we will explore the antagonism and entanglement of slavery and freedom, the two most powerful ideas in American political thought, with a focus on the period from the Declaration of Independence to the Progressive Era. Readings will draw on a range of genres including, judicial decisions, imaginative literature, presidential addresses, canonical works of political theory. Special emphasis will be placed on the writings of African Americans and on the genre of autobiography, as one in which the classic American negotiation between slavery and freedom is often performed with particular poignancy in the course of an individual life. (Political Theory) (formally PSCI 0246) 3 hrs. lect. AMR HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2018

More Information »