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SOAN0103A-F17

CRN: 90221

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0103X-F17

CRN: 90222

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Discussion
Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0103Y-F17

CRN: 90223

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Discussion
Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0103Z-F17

CRN: 90224

Topics in Sociocultural Anthro
Discussion
Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

SOAN0105A-F17

CRN: 90506

Society and the Individual
Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0110A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0110A-F17

CRN: 92537

Current Social Issues in Japan
Please register via JAPN110A
Current Social Issues in Japan (in English)
In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. 3 hr. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0191A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0191A-F17

CRN: 90225

Gender and the Body
Please register via GSFS 0191A
Gender and the Body
What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect.

SOAN0212A-F17

CRN: 92276

Family in Contemporary Society
The Family in Contemporary Society
This course will investigate the social, economic, and political forces that have brought about changes in family life in the beginning of the 21st century. We will begin by looking at various attempts to define "the family," and we will then explore a range of topics, including the webs of family relationships (e.g., mothering, fathering, kin networks), labor and family intersections (e.g., mediating between work and family; the household division of labor), gay and lesbian family life, and domestic violence. Although the focus will be on contemporary United States, we will also examine some cross-cultural and historical material. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0215A-F17

CRN: 92277

Sociology of Education
Sociology of Education
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. Limited places available for students to satisfy the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0232A-F17

CRN: 91682

Africa and Anthropology
Africa and Anthropology: Power, Continuity, and Change
Sub-Saharan Africa has long represented primitive mysteries for Europeans and North Americans, as a ‘Dark Continent’ full of exotic people and animals. Even now, many Americans learn little about Africa and Africans except for ‘thin’ media reports of political, economic, and ecological upheaval or persistent poverty, disease, and despair. This course provides a ‘thick’ description and analysis of contemporary African conditions using ethnographies and films. We will not be exploring ‘traditional African cultures’ outside of their historical contexts or generalizing about ‘what African culture really is.’ Rather, our focus will be on understanding social continuity and change alongside cultural diversity and commonality. Topics will include colonialism, critical kinship studies, African feminism, environmental management, witchcraft and religion. Throughout the course African ideas of power – what it is, who has it, and why –unify these diverse topics as social relations. (Anthropology)/

SOAN0245A-F17

CRN: 92220

Social Life in Age of Big Data
Social Life in an Age of Big Data
Until recently, quantitative social science relied on surveys or official statistics. Today, sociologists may link social media profiles to census records or student loan statements. In this course, we will consider some of the insights that such sources and methods of "Big Data" reveal about society. We will also critically examine the ethical dilemmas and cultural consequences of living in a world where many of our actions and interactions can be turned into data. Readings, discussions and occasional applied exercises will introduce students to core sociological topics and develop the tools to consume and engage quantitative social science research. 3 hrs. lect.

SOAN0245Y-F17

CRN: 92467

Social Life in Age of Big Data
Discussion
Social Life in an Age of Big Data
Until recently, quantitative social science relied on surveys or official statistics. Today, sociologists may link social media profiles to census records or student loan statements. In this course, we will consider some of the insights that such sources and methods of "Big Data" reveal about society. We will also critically examine the ethical dilemmas and cultural consequences of living in a world where many of our actions and interactions can be turned into data. Readings, discussions and occasional applied exercises will introduce students to core sociological topics and develop the tools to consume and engage quantitative social science research. 3 hrs. lect.

SOAN0245Z-F17

CRN: 92468

Social Life in Age of Big Data
Discussion
Social Life in an Age of Big Data
Until recently, quantitative social science relied on surveys or official statistics. Today, sociologists may link social media profiles to census records or student loan statements. In this course, we will consider some of the insights that such sources and methods of "Big Data" reveal about society. We will also critically examine the ethical dilemmas and cultural consequences of living in a world where many of our actions and interactions can be turned into data. Readings, discussions and occasional applied exercises will introduce students to core sociological topics and develop the tools to consume and engage quantitative social science research. 3 hrs. lect.

SOAN0302A-F17

CRN: 90226

Ethnographic Research
The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology)

SOAN0302Z-F17

CRN: 90425

Ethnographic Research
Research Lab
The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology)

SOAN0304A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0304A-F17

CRN: 92278

Gender, Culture, and Power
Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

SOAN0305A-F17

CRN: 91051

Topics in Sociological Theory
Topics in Sociological Theory
This course provides an overview of major lines of development in 20th century social theory relevant to the field of sociology, focusing on how various theorists have grappled with the basic issues that have dominated 20th century social thought. Particular attention will be given to the questions arising from the conceptual distinctions between structure and action, on the one hand, and identity and culture, on the other. How is social order possible? How autonomous are human agents? How do we explain the persistence of observed patterns of human interaction and social practice? How do we analyze relations between the world of everyday life and the large-scale development of social systems? How does social change take place? (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0319A-F17

CRN: 91684

Idea of Drugs and Addiction
The Idea of Drugs and Addiction
Drugs cause panic and social hysteria. We spend time talking about them and expend energy distinguishing between good and bad drugs and users. Movies, documentaries, literature, art, and television shows reflect this preoccupation with the use and misuse of drugs. In this course we will investigate the social significance of “drugs” as a cultural, rather than pharmacological, category. We will consider drugs and addiction as ideas that reflect concerns about the “self” in modernity. We will examine the panic surrounding drug use and addiction, our preoccupation with treatment, and our emphasis on sobriety. Overall, we will engage with the larger themes the idea of drugs and addiction raises: harm, exclusion, inequality, pleasure, freedom, desire, perfection, enlightenment, and control. 3hrs. lect./disc. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0288) (Sociology)

SOAN0328A-F17

CRN: 92280

The Ancient Maya
The Rise and Fall of the Ancient Maya
As perhaps the most famous of all of the cultures of Mesoamerica, the Maya are best known for soaring temples, portraits of kings, a complex hieroglyphic writing system, and a dramatic collapse when their ancient kingdoms were abandoned or destroyed. In this course, we will view their accomplishments through the archaeology of the Classic Period (250-850 AD) and examine how the Maya built cities within the tropical jungles of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras. We will also explore the history of the Maya after the “fall,” from their revival in the post-Classic Period to the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0329A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0329B-F17

CRN: 92281

Refugees or Labor Migrants?
Refugees or Labor Migrants? The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to enter high-income countries. How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on ethnographies of international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., African and Mideastern migration to Europe, and South Asian migration to the Middle East (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1021) Limited places available for students to satisfy the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0329B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0329A-F17

CRN: 92282

Refugees or Labor Migrants?
Refugees or Labor Migrants? The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to enter high-income countries. How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on ethnographies of international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., African and Mideastern migration to Europe, and South Asian migration to the Middle East (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1021) Limited places available for students to satisfy the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0355A-F17

CRN: 92283

Race Ethnicity Across Cultures
Race and Ethnicity Across Cultures
Ethnicity and race are social phenomena that influence group relations, as well as personal identity, in many areas of the world. But what is "ethnicity" and what is "race"? In this course we will explore the varied approaches that have been utilized to understand race and ethnicity across diverse cultural settings. No single explanation of race and ethnicity is all encompassing, and so we will explore a number of different approaches. Among the issues we will examine are: alternative explanations of ethnic and racial identity formation; the causes and consequences of ethnic violence and competition; the connections among ethnicity, gender, and class; and the processes through which distinctions between self and other are created. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOAN0365A-F17

CRN: 92284

Political Sociology
Political Sociology
Political sociology examines the way power operates in society. In this class we will approach this question through different lenses-Liberal-pluralism, Marxism, Elite theory-to achieve an overview of the field. We will cover a variety of related issues including questions of political parties and the state, nationalism, identity, revolutions, and social movements. We will strive to understand why unequal power relations exist and how they change. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOAN0370A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0470A-F17

CRN: 92470

Soc of Knowledge and Food
Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems
What is knowledge? Drawing on social theorists such as
Foucault, Haraway, and Jasanoff, in this course students will use the food system to examine the social construction of knowledge. We will explore the rise and important contributions of science across much of the globe, and we will also regard challenges to science’s dominant position. Students will critically evaluate whether and how other forms of knowledge can or should shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Specific cases will include genetic modification, the patenting of life forms, and food justice. Students with any topical interest, however, are welcome. (SOAN 105). 3 hrs sem. (Sociology)

SOAN0376A-F17

CRN: 91894

Politics of Identity
Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

SOAN0470A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0370A-F17

CRN: 92582

Soc of Knowledge and Food
Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems
What is knowledge? Drawing on social theorists such as
Foucault, Haraway, and Jasanoff, in this course students will use the food system to examine the social construction of knowledge. We will explore the rise and important contributions of science across much of the globe, and we will also regard challenges to science’s dominant position. Students will critically evaluate whether and how other forms of knowledge can or should shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Specific cases will include genetic modification, the patenting of life forms, and food justice. Students with any topical interest, however, are welcome. (SOAN 105). 3 hrs sem. (Sociology)

SOAN0494A-F17

CRN: 92211

Writing for Social Change
Writing Ethnography for Social Change
In this course we will use frequent writing assignments, extensive peer reviews, and analysis of famous texts in a concentrated and intensive effort to improve our own ability to communicate in writing. In the first half of the course, we will focus on writing conventions and controversies in Anthropology, building skills useful in preparing senior work. In the second half of the course, we will break out of these academic conventions to focus on writing for broader audiences. We will ask: how can we successfully communicate the relevance of theoretical concepts in sociology and anthropology to the general public? (SOAN 301 or SOAN 302) 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology)

SOAN0500A-F17

CRN: 90369

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500B-F17

CRN: 90848

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500C-F17

CRN: 90370

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500E-F17

CRN: 90372

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500G-F17

CRN: 90541

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500H-F17

CRN: 90373

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500J-F17

CRN: 90374

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500K-F17

CRN: 90375

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500L-F17

CRN: 90735

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500M-F17

CRN: 90849

Advanced Individual Study
Adv Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0500O-F17

CRN: 92117

Advanced Individual Study
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700A-F17

CRN: 90376

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700B-F17

CRN: 90377

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700C-F17

CRN: 90546

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700E-F17

CRN: 90379

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700G-F17

CRN: 90994

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700H-F17

CRN: 90380

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700J-F17

CRN: 90381

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700K-F17

CRN: 90382

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700L-F17

CRN: 90736

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700M-F17

CRN: 90850

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0700O-F17

CRN: 91343

One-Semester Senior Project
One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710A-F17

CRN: 90383

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710B-F17

CRN: 90384

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710C-F17

CRN: 90385

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710E-F17

CRN: 90387

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710G-F17

CRN: 90550

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710H-F17

CRN: 90388

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710J-F17

CRN: 90389

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710K-F17

CRN: 90390

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710L-F17

CRN: 90737

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710M-F17

CRN: 90851

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

SOAN0710O-F17

CRN: 92118

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Department of Sociology & Anthropology

Munroe Hall
427 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753