Middlebury

 

Svea Closser

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5188
Office Hours: Mondays 12:30-1:30 and Thursdays 9:00-11:00
Download Contact Information

I am a medical anthropologist whose research focuses on the interaction between global health policy and discourse and local health systems.

Currently, I am co-PI of a National Science Foundation-funded project in rural Amhara, Ethiopia. Our focus is on local, materially-impoverished volunteers who serve the rural health system of one of the poorest countries in the world, as well as on the Ethiopian and transnational health officials who rely on and organize these volunteers. Our research goals are to understand how and why global health projects justify the use of volunteer labor in the context of historically unprecedented funding for global health, and how the well-being of volunteers is affected by their service.

Previously, I was the PI of a project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation that explored the effects of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative on Primary Health Care and routine immunization. This project involved field research in seven countries (Nepal, India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Rwanda, Ethiopia, and Angola). Information on this study and our findings is available at our study website,
http://sites.middlebury.edu/polio_eradication_impacts_study/

Since 2005, I have been studying the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, a 20 year, 9 billion dollar project aiming to eliminate poliovirus from the world forever—a goal that thus far has proved elusive. My book, Chasing Polio in Pakistan (Vanderbilt University Press, 2010) explores why eradication is so difficult in Pakistan, one of the last countries with endemic polio.

Recent Publications (asterisks indicate Middlebury student coauthors):

Closser, Svea, Kelly Cox, Thomas M. Parris, R. Matthew Landis, Judith Justice, Ranjani Gopinath, Kenneth Maes, Hailom Banteyerga Amaha, Ismaila Zango Mohammed, Aminu Mohammed Dukku, Patricia A. Omidian, Emma Varley, Pauley Tedoff, Adam D. Koon, Laetitia Nyirazinyoye, Matthew A. Luck, W. Frank Pont, Jr, Vanessa Neergheen*, Anat Rosenthal, Peter Nsubuga, Naveen Thacker, Rashid Jooma and Elizabeth Nuttall*. 2014. “The Impact of Polio Eradication on Routine Immunization and Primary Health Care: A Mixed-Methods Study.” Journal of Infectious Diseases.
http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/jit232?
ijkey=M1ODQNxeBBjcoWt&keytype=ref

Maes, Kenneth, Svea Closser and Ippolytos Kalofonos. 2014. “Listening to Community Health Workers: How Ethnographic Research can Inform Positive Relationships between CHWs, Health Institutions, and Communities.” American Journal of Public Health, 104(5): e5-e9.

Mounier-Jack, Sandra, Ulla K Griffiths, Svea Closser, Helen Burchett and Bruno Marchal. 2014. “Measuring the Health Systems Impact of Disease Control Programs: Critical Assessment of the WHO Building Blocks Framework.” BMC Public Health 14: 278. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/278

Closser, Svea and Rashid Jooma. 2013. “Why We Must Provide Better Support for Pakistan's Female Frontline Health Workers.” PLOS Medicine 10(10): e1001528.
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001528

Closser, Svea, Anat Rosenthal, Thomas Parris, Kenneth Maes, Judith Justice, Kelly Cox, Matthew A Luck, R M Landis, John Grove, Pauley Tedoff, Linda Venczel, Peter Nsubuga, Jennifer Kuzara and Vanessa Neergheen*. 2012. “Methods for Evaluating the Impact of Vertical Programs on Health Systems: Protocol for a Study on the Impact of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative on Strengthening Routine Immunization and Primary Health Care.” BMC Public Health 12: 728.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/12/728

Closser, Svea. 2012. "'We Can't Give Up Now': Global Health Optimism and Polio Eradication in Pakistan." Medical Anthropology 31 (5): 385-403.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1333 - Epidemics      

Epidemics
In this seminar we will explore epidemics from a social scientific perspective. Examining disease outbreaks from the black plague to swine flu, we will explore questions like: What is an epidemic? What are the social factors that put certain populations at risk for disease? Why do some epidemics get extensive media attention, while others that kill many more people remain invisible? In this seminar we will read and discuss case studies of epidemics and theoretical perspectives on why they happen. Students will carry out a research project on an epidemic of their choice.

CW SOC

Spring 2011

More Information »

FYSE 1402 - The Social Life of Wilderness      

The Social Life of Wilderness
In this seminar we will examine evolving American ideas of “wilderness” from a social science perspective. We will explore how ideas of what wilderness is—or should be—play out in complex cases including the removal of Native Americans from some U.S. National Parks and the establishment of wilderness parks in poor countries that cater to tourists. Through a focus on the nearby Adirondack Park, which contains both land designated in the New York state constitution as “forever wild” and the homes of 130,000 people, we will explore historian William Cronon’s question: “How do you manage a wilderness full of human stories?” 3 hrs. sem.

CW NOR SOC

Fall 2013

More Information »

IGST 0705 - African Studies Senior Thesis      

African Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

INDE 0800 - Ind Scholar Thesis      

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

More Information »

INTL 0705 - African Studies Senior Thesis      

African Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

More Information »

INTL 0707 - South Asian Studies      

South Asian Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2011, Winter 2012

More Information »

SOAN 0267 - Global Health      

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

SOAN 0302 - Ethnographic Research      

The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology)

DED SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

SOAN 0353 / RELI 0353 - Anthropology Muslim Cultures      

Islam in Practice: Anthropology of Muslim Cultures
In this course, we will explore Muslim cultures across the world. We will approach Islam from an anthropological, as opposed to a text-based or theological, perspective. We will take a global view, focusing not only on the Middle East but on Muslim societies in North America, Europe, Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and South-East Asia. Topics we will cover include: (1) the diversity of Muslim identity and practice; (2) the impact of colonialism and empire on Muslim societies; (3) women's experiences of Islam; and (4) the politics of religious practice. (Prior coursework in anthropology, sociology, or religion recommended) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

AAL CMP PHL SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

More Information »

SOAN 0387 - Medical Anthropology      

Medical Anthropology: Approaches to Affliction and Healing
In this course, an introduction to medical anthropology, we will explore cultural and political-economic perspectives on health, illness, and disease. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) medical systems, including biomedicine and others; (3) the effects of poverty and inequality on health outcomes; and (4) the social construction of health and illness. Students will apply these concepts in understanding an aspect of health, illness, or healing in their own research project with an ethnographic component. An introductory course in anthropology or familiarity with medical or public health issues is recommended. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

CMP SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2011

More Information »

SOAN 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

SOAN 0700 - One-Semester Senior Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

SOAN 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »