Middlebury

 

Jamie McCallum

Assistant Professor of Sociology

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Phone: work802.443.5630
Fax: fax(802) 443-2517
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My research and teaching interests emerge from my engagement with political activism and social movements. My book, Global Unions, Local Power, examines the ability of workers to cooperate and exercise power across national borders. It draws on research I conducted in nine countries, and was in many ways inspired by my experience as a labor activist. Sociology offers a lens to view these two aspects of my life in dynamic interaction.

I left Brooklyn in the summer of 2011. Since then I have started a new research project with the help of several student research assistants at Middlebury. This new project, Against Work: The Indignity of the Daily Grind, explores a classic sociological question concerning the work ethic in America. Why did “hard work,” a source of so much misery, become so widely associated with “social good” in late twentieth century America?  

I am currently teaching courses in the Sociology of Labor, Globalization, Political Sociology, Social Theory, Organizing for Social Change, a social geography class and a seminar on sexuality. These courses build on my teaching in the past at the City University of New York.

For more information see Professor McCallum's c.v.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1385 - Great Transformations      

Great Transformations
In this seminar we will explore the phenomenon of globalization by examining historical moments of rupture and revolution—the transition to modernity, the rise of the state and national identity, the social movements of 1968, the collapse of communism, and the rise and crisis of neoliberalism. We will examine both classic and recent texts, films, music, and manifestos to understand what constitutes a truly great transformation. Emphasis will be placed on the global stage, but the American experience will also be highlighted. 3 hrs sem.

CW HIS SOC

Fall 2012

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IGST 0404 / GEOG 0404 / SOAN 0404 - GeoLabor and Youth      

Global Geographies of Labor and Youth
In this seminar we will examine the relationship between the spatial organization of the global political economy and the lives of working people and youth. We will investigate a variety of industrial and agrarian contexts in North America, Latin America, South Africa, India, and China. We will place an emphasis on the problems posed by labor and capital mobility, and global production networks that impact worker organization and the lives of children and young people. Students must have advanced reading ability in a language other than English as they will be required to work with foreign language sources. This course is equivalent to SOAN 0404 and GEOG 0404. (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2014

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INDE 0800 - Ind Scholar Thesis      

Winter 2014, Spring 2014

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SOAN 0105 - Society and the Individual      

Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. (Not open to second semester juniors or seniors without approval) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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SOAN 0201 - Sociology of Labor      

Sociology of Labor
In this class we will survey the sociological literature on labor and labor movements in America and around the world. We will raise questions related to the organization and transformation of work, the making of class society, trade unionism and other class-based organizing, and the impact of globalization on labor organizations. Exploration of these key themes will happen through an analysis of classic and contemporary texts, as well as fiction and film. This is a seminar-style course with opportunities for students to lead class discussions and debates. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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SOAN 0255 - Social Change      

Social Change: Theory and Practice
In this course we will take a behind-the-scenes look at how people organize grassroots social movements by exploring the art, theory, and science of making social change. By examining case studies of different movements, we will consider varied perspectives on power and powerlessness, political organization, collective action, and reform versus revolution. As a crash course in organizing for change, we will practice the hands-on tactics and strategies that social movement organizers employ to foment social transformation from the bottom up: creating a campaign strategy, mobilizing workers and communities, analyzing power structures, and developing leadership. Through partnerships with local organizations, we will have the chance to learn about and participate in ongoing campaigns. Students will craft political manifestos, draft strategy reports, and respond to readings and films. (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1023) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Fall 2014

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SOAN 0260 - Sociology of Globalization      

Globalization and Its Discontents
In this course we will explore one of the most fundamental dynamics of our time-globalization. Underlying so many changes in our economic, political, and cultural lives, globalization has transformed our world in innumerable ways. Nonetheless, debates about the nature of these processes and outcomes are largely unresolved and often completely misunderstood. In this survey course we will examine particular themes related to the general concept of globalization: transnational civil society and social movements, economic development, postmodernism, global governance. We will read from sources across the academic disciplines and make use of journalism, film, and popular nonfiction. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

CMP SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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SOAN 0365 - Political Sociology      

Political Sociology
Political sociology examines the way power operates in society. In this class we will approach this question through different lenses-Liberal-pluralism, Marxism, Elite theory-to achieve an overview of the field. We will cover a variety of related issues including questions of political parties and the state, nationalism, identity, revolutions, and social movements. We will strive to understand why unequal power relations exist and how they change. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology)

NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013

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SOAN 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SOAN 0700 - One-Semester Senior Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SOAN 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SOAN 1023 - Organizing for Social Change      

Organizing for Social Change
In this course we will examine the theory and practice of building peoples’ movements for social change. We will consider problems of power and powerlessness, political organization, collective action, social movements, and reform versus revolution. As a crash course in organizing for change, we will practice the hands-on tactics and strategies that social movement organizers employ to foment social transformation from the grassroots: creating a campaign strategy, mobilizing workers and communities, power structure analysis, and leadership development. Students will craft political manifestos, draft strategy reports and press releases, and respond to readings and films. (Sociology)

SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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