« Fall 2017 Spring 2018

WRPR0101A-S18

CRN: 22302

Writing Workshop II
Writing Workshop II
All sections of this course will address a variety of writing techniques and communications tools. Each section will focus on a particular theme. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WRPR0102A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0102A-S18

CRN: 21853

English Lang in Global Context
English Language in Global Context
In this course, we will discuss and write about the dominance of English in the global landscape. The course reader, The Handbook of World Englishes (2006), offers an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. We will begin the course with a geographic and historical overview of World Englishes and then will examine the impact of English language dominance on individuals and societies, emphasizing themes such as migration, globalization, education, and identity. Throughout the course, we will explore the relevance of these issues to educators, linguists, and policy-makers around the world.

WRPR0172A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0172A-S18

CRN: 22328

Writing Gender & Sexuality
Please register via GSFS 0172A
Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Claire, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with choreographer Maree Remalia to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex. 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0202A-S18

CRN: 21074

Writing To Heal
This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations.

WRPR0205A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0205A-S18

CRN: 22389

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect

WRPR0206A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0206A-S18

CRN: 22307

Narratives in News Media
Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WRPR0207A-S18

CRN: 22499

Intercultural Rhetoric Lab
Intercultural Rhetoric Lab
What are the tensions inherent in intercultural communication, and what happens when we go further, and attempt to influence others? In this course connecting Middlebury College and MIIS students, we will create a digital laboratory to investigate, and develop the practice of, intercultural listening and speaking. Weekly seminars will introduce rhetorical techniques designed to help students negotiate power differences, deliberate collaboratively, observe and question empathetically. A weekly lab section will challenge students to create live events and digital artifacts that demonstrate their developing capacities as communicators and agents of change. 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0211A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0211A-S18

CRN: 22401

Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0303A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0303A-S18

CRN: 21854

Outlaw Women
Please register via GSFS 0303A
Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. (Any one GSFS Course)

WRPR0333A-S18

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0333A-S18

CRN: 21941

Writing on Contemporary Issues
Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0500B-S18

CRN: 20220

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500C-S18

CRN: 20221

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500D-S18

CRN: 20418

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500E-S18

CRN: 20586

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500F-S18

CRN: 20829

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500G-S18

CRN: 21088

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)