Middlebury

2009

2009 Awards

Jeanne Meserve '74

Jeanne Meserve has been at the heart of breaking news since the day she graduated from Middlebury in 1974. With a degree in English and a drive for reporting, Jeanne began her career at ABC News, where she spent three years as a state department correspondent before expanding her coverage worldwide. She reported extensively from overseas, covering Beijing in the wake of the Tiananmen Square uprising, the hostage situation in Lebanon, tensions in the Persian Gulf, and the intricacies of U.S.-Soviet relations.

In 1993, she joined CNN as an anchor. Her coverage included the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, for which she won a New York Festival Gold Medal. In 1997, she earned an Emmy for her contribution to the network’s coverage of the Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta. She also anchored CNN’s award-winning coverage of the death of Princess Diana and was part of the team that won an Edward R. Murrow award for reporting on the young Cuban boy, Elian Gonzales. Jeanne’s political reporting has included coverage of campaigns for Lamar Alexander, Bill Bradley and Pat Buchanan, as well as floor reporting from the Democratic and Republican conventions in 1996 and 2000, including the 2000 election recount.

Currently a D.C.-based correspondent for CNN, Jeanne covers homeland security. In 2005, she was part of CNN’s Peabody award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina, providing the first reports of devastating flooding in New Orleans.
We are pleased to honor Jeanne here today for her seemingly boundless spirit and ongoing diligence in reporting the news of our lives.

Alex Rossmiller '04

After four years as a diligent and thoughtful political science major with a focus on the Middle East, Alex Rossmiller wasted little time making the most of his academic experience after graduation. Shortly upon leaving the Green Mountains of his alma mater, Alex joined the Defense Department’s Defense Intelligence Agency in 2004. He soon volunteered to join a unit in Iraq, and gained rare and often disturbing insight into the increasingly volatile situation there.

For his work in Iraq, Alex was awarded the Joint Civilian Service Achievement Award and the Defense Intelligence Agency Expeditionary Medal for valorous and meritorious service. In 2006, he became a fellow with the National Security Network and currently works with the NSN to focus his experience and efforts on revitalizing the country’s national security policy for a new era.
Alex is the author of "Still Broken," an account of his time at the Pentagon and in Iraq, published to high acclaim by Random House in 2008.  His commentary has appeared in the New Republic, the American Prospect, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and other leading news outlets, and he is a member of the Truman National Security Project, a national security leadership institute geared toward a new generation of progressives.  In his spare time, he is a student at the NYU School of Law, from which he will graduate next year.

In the spring of 2008, Alex returned to campus to participate in the International Studies Colloquium sponsored by the Rohatyn Center, and we are pleased today to welcome him back once again and honor him for the perseverance and dedication he has shown thus far in his impressive career.

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