Middlebury

 

Till Fellner, piano; 10/09/2010

 

Till Fellner, piano
Saturday, October 9, 2010
8:00 P.M.
Mahaney Center for the Arts, Concert Hall

With his scrupulous musicianship, purity of style, and sparkling keyboard command, Austrian pianist Till Fellner is in demand at all the major music venues. The Washington Post proclaims that this student of Alfred Brendel "plays Beethoven sonatas like a poet." Fellner's Vermont premiere opens the 91st season of the Performing Arts Series with three masterpieces constituting a perfect distillation of Beethoven's famous "third period": Piano Sonatas no. 30 in E, op. 109; no. 31 in A-flat, op. 110; and no. 32 in C Minor, op. 111.

Reserved Seating. Tickets: $24/18/6; on sale to College ID card holders now; on sale to the general public September 13.

http://go.middlebury.edu/tickets or 802-443-MIDD (6433).


Video
Till Fellner, piano

Program

BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 30 in E Major for Piano, Op. 109

  1. Vivace, ma non troppo
  2. Prestissimo
  3. Gesangvoll, mit innigser Empfindung. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo

BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major for Piano, Op. 110

  1. Moderato cantabile molto espressivo
  2. Allegro molto
  3. Adagio ma non troppo - Fuga. Allegro ma non troppo

BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 32 in C minor for Piano, Op. 111

  1. Maestoso - Allegro con brio ed appassionato
  2. Arietta. Adagio molto semplice e cantabile

Artist Biography

Till Fellner, piano

Till Fellner was born in Vienna, where he studied with Helene Sedo-Stadler. Further studies led him to Alfred Brendel, Meira Farkas, Oleg Maisenberg, and Claus-Christian Schuster.

Mr. Fellner's international career was launched in 1993 when he won First Prize at the Clara Haskil Competition in Vevey, Switzerland. Since then he has performed as guest artist with many renowned orchestras and at the major music centres of Europe, the United States, and Japan, as well as at prestigious festivals around the world.

He has collaborated with numerous conductors, including Claudio Abbado, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Christoph von Dohnányi, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Heinz Holliger, Marek Janowski, Sir Charles Mackerras, Sir Neville Marriner, Kurt Masur, Kent Nagano, Jukka-Pekka Saraste, Leonard Slatkin, Claudius Traunfellner, Franz Welser-Möst, and Hans Zender.

In the fall of 2010 Mr. Fellner concludes his celebrated cycle of Beethoven sonatas, which has taken him to New York, Washington, Tokyo, London, Paris, and Vienna. His recital programme for the new season includes works by Haydn, Schumann, and Liszt, as well as a world premiere of a composition by Kit Armstrong. During the 2010-11 season, Mr. Fellner will place an increasing emphasis on orchestral engagements; he is scheduled to tour South America with the Bamberg Symphony and Jonathan Nott, and Spain with the Munich Chamber Orchestra. He will also be appearing as soloist with the Concertgebouw Orkest, Orchestre de Paris, Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Berlin, the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra, Orchestre National de Lyon and the Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse, to name just a few.

Other projects include a European tour with Lisa Batiashvili and Adrian Brendel, with whom he will perform the world premiere of a piano trio by Harrison Birtwistle, as well as lieder recitals of the three Schubert cycles with Mark Padmore.

Till Fellner has numerous recordings to his credit; his most recent release on the ECM label was of the Beethoven Piano Concertos Nos. 4 and 5 with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal and Kent Nagano, as well as the premiere of „Böse Zellen," a piano concerto by Thomas Larcher with the Munich Chamber Orchestra and Dennis Russell Davies.

Artist Website: http://www.tillfellner.com/


Press Quotes

"Fellner executes runs of stroboscopic evenness and clarity. The weight dissolves and the architecture dances."--Alex Ross, The New Yorker

"scrupulous musicianship and an intelligence that palpably searches in all directions for stimulus"--Paul Driver, The London Sunday Times

"Till Fellner is turning out to be one of the great musical chameleons."--Allan Kozinn, The New York Times