Per Urlaub

Associate Dean of Language Schools, Associate Professor

 
 work(802) 443-5649
 Wednesday, 9:30 -10:45, and by appointment
 Sunderland Language Center

I am an Associate College Professor at Middlebury and teach in the Linguistics Program. I also serve as the Associate Dean for Curriculum at the Middlebury Language Schools. I hold a PhD in German from Stanford University, and I have taught German Studies, Applied Linguistics, and European Studies in Germany, the UK, and the United States. Before coming to Middlebury in 2017, I was an Associate Professor at the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. My scholarly contributions to the fields of second-language literacy research, intercultural learning, curriculum development, educational policy, international education, teacher training, and instructional technology enrich the experiences of college students and their teachers. You can find my full curriculum vita and selected publications at middlebury.academia.edu/perurlaub.

In my administrative role as the Associate Dean for Curriculum at the Middlebury Language Schools, I promote curricular articulation and instructional innovation within, across and beyond our eleven summer programs. I offer advice and support to language school directors and their faculty on a variety of matters such as curricular initiatives, new program design, faculty development, and impact assessment. I also coordinate initiatives with colleagues in the College, the Schools Abroad, and the Institute. A staunch believer in the critical importance of linguistic and intercultural competencies for current and future generations, I am thankful that my administrative profile at Middlebury directly relates to my identity as a teacher-scholar and is informed by my life experiences as a global citizen.  

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

LNGT 0242 / EDST 0242 - Non-Native Speakers      

The Non-Native Speaker in a Multilingual World
In this course we will address linguistic, educational, and ideological dimensions of the non-native speaker identity and multilingual societies. What does it mean to be a non-native speaker? Why is this linguistic identity considered by some to be a stigma and by others to be a privilege? How do societies succeed in and fail at integrating speakers of different languages? In which ways do language policies and educational practices in the United States and around the world reflect linguistic and social realities? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP SOC

Spring 2018

 

Brochures