Middlebury Language School Graduate Programs

 

Schedule

« Summer 2013 Summer 2014 Language Schools

FREN6509A-L14

CRN: 60142

Applied Stylistics I

FREN 6509 is a refresher course that systematically covers all the basic language structures and various types of discourse : narrative, descriptive, and dialectical. The objective is to encourage students to write clearly and subtly.
The course focuses on the daily practice of exercises.

Required Text:
1) A unilingual dictionary; 2) Nouvelle grammaire du français (cours de civilisation de la Sorbonne), par Y. Delatour, D. Jennepin, M. Léon-Dufour et B. Teyssier, Hachette, 2004 (ISBN : 9782011552716).

FREN6509B-L14

CRN: 60261

Applied Stylistics I

FREN 6509 is a refresher course that systematically covers all the basic language structures and various types of discourse : narrative, descriptive, and dialectical. The objective is to encourage students to write clearly and subtly.
The course focuses on the daily practice of exercises.

Required Text:
1) A unilingual dictionary; 2) Nouvelle grammaire du français (cours de civilisation de la Sorbonne), par Y. Delatour, D. Jennepin, M. Léon-Dufour et B. Teyssier, Hachette, 2004 (ISBN : 9782011552716).

FREN6510A-L14

CRN: 60145

Applied Stylistics II

This course aims to help students perfect their written French, explore and use argumentative strategies, and develop an authentic style. Identification and resolution of writing problems, stylistic exercises and composition of texts, independently and in workshops.

Required Text:
Chovelon, Bernadette et Barthe, Marie (2002); Expression et style: Français de perfectionnement. ISBN 2 7061 1081 8;Presses Universitaires de Grenoble

FREN6510B-L14

CRN: 60146

Applied Stylistics II

This course aims to help students perfect their written French, explore and use argumentative strategies, and develop an authentic style. Identification and resolution of writing problems, stylistic exercises and composition of texts, independently and in workshops.

Required Text:
Chovelon, Bernadette et Barthe, Marie (2002); Expression et style: Français de perfectionnement. ISBN 2 7061 1081 8;Presses Universitaires de Grenoble

FREN6514A-L14

CRN: 60147

Applied Phonetics

This course is for students wishing to develop and perfect their oral production.
The objectives of this course are two-folds:
1. To develop an understanding of the principles that govern French language and:
2. To put these principles into practice in order that students may improve their pronunciation and aural comprehension.
The phonetics courses are adapted to the mother tongue of the students.
Each class will include systematic work on pronunciation, rhythm and intonation through a wide array of oral exercises (discrimination and repetition).
Students will also work individually in a virtual language laboratory.

N.B.: Initially, first-year graduate students will be placed in this course on the basis of their scores on the oral interview; although any remaining seats will be opened to other interested students, they should normally register in 6612.

Required Text:
L. Charliac, A-C. Moton; Phonétique progressive niveau intermédiaire avec 600 exercices; ISBN: 978-209.033880-5; Clé-international 1998. No CD Required

FREN6514B-L14

CRN: 60148

Applied Phonetics

This course is for students wishing to develop and perfect their oral production.
The objectives of this course are two-folds:
1. To develop an understanding of the principles that govern French language and:
2. To put these principles into practice in order that students may improve their pronunciation and aural comprehension.
The phonetics courses are adapted to the mother tongue of the students.
Each class will include systematic work on pronunciation, rhythm and intonation through a wide array of oral exercises (discrimination and repetition).
Students will also work individually in a virtual language laboratory.

N.B.: Initially, first-year graduate students will be placed in this course on the basis of their scores on the oral interview; although any remaining seats will be opened to other interested students, they should normally register in 6612.

Required Text:
L. Charliac, A-C. Moton; Phonétique progressive niveau intermédiaire avec 600 exercices; ISBN: 978-209.033880-5; Clé-international 1998. No CD Required

FREN6524A-L14

CRN: 60361

Introduction to Linguistics

This course is meant to be a first contact with the principles and methods of linguistic analysis. Involving an introduction to linguistics, this course is appropriate for those begining their French linguistic studies as well as to advanced level students willing to increase and systematize their knowledge by means of a structured reflection on certain fundamental concepts of general linguistics.
An introduction to a complex discipline can be dealt with through different approaches. While proposing a view of the organization and functioning of the human language, presenting the great notions of modern linguistics and the main research fields, we will divide the present course into four broad areas: phonetics and phonology, morphology, lexical semantics, and semantics of the enunciation (enunciative and pragmatic approach).

No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

No textbook required

FREN6525A-L14

CRN: 60198

Intro to Literary Analysis

This course will help social science and literary students master analytical and textual methodologies. These methodologies will allow students to read and comprehend texts in depth while developing their written analytical skills by performing methodological exercises such as summaries, technical explanations, close readings, argumentative dialectical essay, reading analyses or oral thematic presentations.

In these exercises, we will study tropes on the Other in literature, anthropology, sociology, and politics. What representation and images of travel, the foreign and the Other, stem from the French reader’s perspective? And who is this Other? Etymologically “the one who is not here”, the Other can be the neighbor, the opposite sex, the foreigner -- whoever is different. And what usage is made of such fluctuating representations? In a quest for travel and alterity through different texts spanning the 16th to the 21st centuries, we will explore the anthropological, sociological, political, stylistical, poetical, critical and ideological renewal of transcribed viewpoints of human identity and French clichés. To this end, we will study textual excerpts from different horizons might they be geographical, political, sociological, anthropological or historical.

Required Text:
1) a coursepack comprised of diverse argumentative texts
2) Le Supplément au Voyage de Bougainville (Diderot) ISBN 2253138099; LGF Libretti 13809
3) La Théorie du Voyage (Michel Onfray) ISBN 2253084419; LGF LDP Biblio essai 4417
4) Le Roi de Kahel (Tierno Monénembo) ISBN 2020851671; Seuil Cadre Rouge

FREN6587A-L14

CRN: 60288

Francophone Lit of Maghreb

(Section A – Methodology ; Section B – Literature)

From its genesis in the nineteenth century, francophone literature of North Africa has not ceased to inspire controversy. Supplanting an existing cultural and linguistic foundation, it found its rightful place through the cultural imagery of the three Maghrebian countries, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. Initially conceived as a form vehiculaire (idiom of communication), over time the written works of the Maghreb evolved into a vernaculaire (idiom of expression). Before constituting a full-fledged literary domain, pedagogical materials written in French by teachers who were natives of the Maghreb appeared in the form of reviews, such as Soleil and Simoun. Unfairly dismissed by critics as “mimetic”, this generation nevertheless would become pioneers in a discourse of protest, paving the way for more substantial works by the writers who would follow. This course will use a comparative format to address francophone literature in terms of its variety of expression and its diversity of production. We will seek understanding by referring both to French literature and to the theoretical prisms which permit an analytical approach to the texts. The literature of the Maghreb lays claim to its specificity by forming an autonomous domain of creation and study. We will attempt to define the sociological and anthropological stakes which are at play in each text. We will also examine from a literary perspective the significant 'shake-ups' of these societies and their treatment, such as independence, linguistic and democratic questions, and, finally individual liberty, notably that of the woman. We will also examine the panorama of the literature of immigration, also referred to as “Beurre”. Lastly, we will evoke the works of two major writers whose perspectives undoubtedly entail a process which is at once transnational and universal. It consists of moving beyond the close borders of francophonie in order to propose a new method of examining the new horizons of a 'francopolyphonique' style.

N.B Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525)*.

FREN6587B-L14

CRN: 60289

Francophone Lit of Maghreb

(Section A – Methodology ; Section B – Literature)

From its genesis in the nineteenth century, francophone literature of North Africa has not ceased to inspire controversy. Supplanting an existing cultural and linguistic foundation, it found its rightful place through the cultural imagery of the three Maghrebian countries, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. Initially conceived as a form vehiculaire (idiom of communication), over time the written works of the Maghreb evolved into a vernaculaire (idiom of expression). Before constituting a full-fledged literary domain, pedagogical materials written in French by teachers who were natives of the Maghreb appeared in the form of reviews, such as Soleil and Simoun. Unfairly dismissed by critics as “mimetic”, this generation nevertheless would become pioneers in a discourse of protest, paving the way for more substantial works by the writers who would follow. This course will use a comparative format to address francophone literature in terms of its variety of expression and its diversity of production. We will seek understanding by referring both to French literature and to the theoretical prisms which permit an analytical approach to the texts. The literature of the Maghreb lays claim to its specificity by forming an autonomous domain of creation and study. We will attempt to define the sociological and anthropological stakes which are at play in each text. We will also examine from a literary perspective the significant 'shake-ups' of these societies and their treatment, such as independence, linguistic and democratic questions, and, finally individual liberty, notably that of the woman. We will also examine the panorama of the literature of immigration, also referred to as “Beurre”. Lastly, we will evoke the works of two major writers whose perspectives undoubtedly entail a process which is at once transnational and universal. It consists of moving beyond the close borders of francophonie in order to propose a new method of examining the new horizons of a 'francopolyphonique' style.

N.B Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525)*.

FREN6601A-L14

CRN: 60549

Studies of Semantic-Pragmatic

In this course we propose a linguistic approach of discourse operators (adverbs, conjunctions, several locutions). The scientific study framework of our object is a recent version of language argumentation theory whitch includes, in particular, strategic discourse notion, theory of stereotypes and polyphony. In the first part of the course, we will attempt to develop a method of analysis based on these notions which will be of use to the description of the chosen linguistics units. In the second part, we will apply the methodology acquired in a corpus of examples having the same lexical entity, to determine the various semantic values.

No textbook required

FREN6609A-L14

CRN: 60304

Comparative Stylistics

Learning a foreign language, contrary to what happens for a mother tongue, usually does not occur in a vacuum. Any foreign language student quickly becomes aware of the fact that interferences do exist between the native language and the studied language; these may take the names of false-friends, anglicisms , gallicisms, literal translations etc. The objective of this course will be to become aware of the processes which may be at play when going from one language to the other, a field of study which is called comparative stylistics or science of translating. The aim will therefore be to identify, understand and master the mechanisms at stake in order to improve one’s competence in the French language, while being aware of the “juncture points” between English and French. The course is primarily intended for 2nd, 3rd or 4th year students, or students not having to take 509 or 510.

There will be no compulsory text book, documents will be posted from week to week on the course site; however it might be advisable to have a good unilingual French dictionary (for example: Lexis Larousse de la langue française) and a good bilingual dictionary (for example: Le Robert & Collins français-anglais et anglais-français).

FREN6612A-L14

CRN: 60552

Language & Theater

N.B. This course meets 2 hours per day

This course aims at developing ease and fluidity of oral communication in French. With support of contemporary Francophone's plays, students will discover the French languages diversity by working on pronunciation, quality of their voice, gesture, breathing... A short production composed of different parts of the plays studied during the course will be performed in public toward the end of the summer session.

Required Text:
1) Collectif; Embouteillage Caraïbe; ISBN 978-2 -87282-687-2; Lansman
2) Michel marc Bouchard; Les muses orphelines; ISBN 2-7609-0358-3; LEMEAC
3) José Pliya; Lettres à l’humanité ISBN 978-2-87282-667-4; Lansman

FREN6622A-L14

CRN: 60553

Francophone Cinema 1969-2012

Francophone Cinema and the Question of Autonomy (1969-2012)*

FREN6623A-L14

CRN: 60462

Hist in French Caribbean Lit

This course studies the period of post-colonial literary history of Caribbean and French West Indies literatures through the famous novels of Patrick Chamoiseau (Texaco), Maryse Condé (Moi, Tituba, sorcière noire de Salem), Dany Laferrière (Pays sans chapeau) and Gisèle Pineau (L’exil selon Julia). The narratives of these francophone writers examine the problems of identity of the people born in the Caribbean (Haiti, Guadeloupe or Martinique) trying to deal with ideologies of liberation or progress. We will analyze anti-colonial figures (both men and women) and aspects of the Creole language in these works of art.

Required Text:
1) Patrick Chamoiseau, Texaco, ISBN-13 : 9782070727506
2) Maryse Condé, Moi tituba sorcière, ISBN-13: 978-2070379293;
3) Dany Laferrière, Pays sans chapeau, ISBN-13 : 9782842612696
4) Gisèle Pineau, Chair Piment, ISBN-13 : 9782070315482

FREN6624A-L14

CRN: 60464

Myth of Paris in French Lit

This course will examine the different aspects and the numerous meanings of the literary image of Paris in French literature from its medieval origins to its contemporary achievement. We will find the first occurrences of this image in François Villon’s poetry at the end of the Middle Ages, and, two and three centuries later, in Boileau’s Satires and Prevost’s and Diderot’s novels. The literary image of Paris reached its full development in the 19th century in the fiction of Balzac, Hugo, Flaubert and Zola and in Baudelaire’s poems: we will analyze the various moral, aesthetic, political, ideological components which make up the complete image. We will follow its evolution, fifty years later, in early 20th century poetry (Apollinaire, the Surréalistes) and then, before World War II, in Celine’s novels. On the way, we will explore other kinds of arts and artists, painters, singers, photographers, filmmakers, who, like writers, contributed to the development of a collective imaginary picture of the city —the myth of Paris.

FREN6629A-L14

CRN: 60554

Teaching Oral Comp in FSL

Teaching Oral Comprehension and Production in French as a second language

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principles and techniques of teaching oral comprehension and production in the French second language classroom. Topics to be covered include models and characteristics of oral comprehension and production, methods of teaching oral comprehension and production, text types, preparing texts for use with learners of different ages and abilities, responding to student production, the evaluation of oral comprehension and production, and the use of technological resources.

No textbook required

FREN6631A-L14

CRN: 60562

Intro to Children's Lit

Introduction to Children's Literature

FREN6631B-L14

CRN: 60563

Intro to Children's Lit

Introduction to Children's Literature

FREN6639A-L14

CRN: 60555

World Economy 1945-2014

The World Economy from 1945 to 2014
(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

The aim of this course is to give the students a broad view of the main economical events since the post war reconstruction to the world crisis.
We will first study the rebuilding of the world economy after the WWII, the beginning of the common market, the thirties golden years as well as the american leadership. Then, we will focus on the oil crisis and of the new economical order that came after the seventies. In this period, we will study the windening of Europe, the collapse of communist world and the victory of liberalism. Finally, we will explain the outcome of the globalisation and the rise the emmerging economies like China, India and Brazil as well as the growth of the African countries. Of course, we will spend some time to explain the world crisis and its consequences on the economical structures. We will give an interdisciplinary view of those topics. Our analysis will be mainly economical but we will also give a sociological, cultural and historical point of view. The students do not need to have an economical background to follow this course.

Required Text:
Daniel Cohen; La Prospérité du vice; ISBN est : 978-2-253-15965-0; édition le livre de poche

FREN6639B-L14

CRN: 60556

World Economy 1945-2014

The World Economy from 1945 to 2014
(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

The aim of this course is to give the students a broad view of the main economical events since the post war reconstruction to the world crisis.
We will first study the rebuilding of the world economy after the WWII, the beginning of the common market, the thirties golden years as well as the american leadership. Then, we will focus on the oil crisis and of the new economical order that came after the seventies. In this period, we will study the windening of Europe, the collapse of communist world and the victory of liberalism. Finally, we will explain the outcome of the globalisation and the rise the emmerging economies like China, India and Brazil as well as the growth of the African countries. Of course, we will spend some time to explain the world crisis and its consequences on the economical structures. We will give an interdisciplinary view of those topics. Our analysis will be mainly economical but we will also give a sociological, cultural and historical point of view. The students do not need to have an economical background to follow this course.

Required Text:
Daniel Cohen; La Prospérité du vice; ISBN est : 978-2-253-15965-0; édition le livre de poche

FREN6640A-L14

CRN: 60225

Hist France:Metropol to Global

History of France—From the Metropolitan to the Global Level
(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

This course offers students a condensed panorama of the principal changes marking the history of France since the Age of Enlightenment. France will be studied from the perspectives of the metropolis and its external relationships and actions (colonies, migrations, exiles, etc.). Two topics receiving particular attention will be the creation of the nation-state confronted with the instability of political regimes, and social, religious, and cultural identities, from the search for unity to recognition of minorities.

N.B. Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525) or they can choose standard evaluation without validating the methodology unit.

Required Text:
1) Berstein, Winock; Histoire de la France politique, tome 3, L’invention de la démocratie: 1789-1914; ISBN-13: 978-2757802267; Seuil
2) Berstein, Winock; Histoire de la France politique, tome 4, La République recommencée: 1914 à nos jours;
ISBN-13: 978-2757831656 or 9782757802274; Seuil

FREN6640B-L14

CRN: 60287

Hist France:Metropol to Global

History of France—From the Metropolitan to the Global Level
(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

This course offers students a condensed panorama of the principal changes marking the history of France since the Age of Enlightenment. France will be studied from the perspectives of the metropolis and its external relationships and actions (colonies, migrations, exiles, etc.). Two topics receiving particular attention will be the creation of the nation-state confronted with the instability of political regimes, and social, religious, and cultural identities, from the search for unity to recognition of minorities.

N.B. Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525) or they can choose standard evaluation without validating the methodology unit.

Required Text:
1) Berstein, Winock; Histoire de la France politique, tome 3, L’invention de la démocratie: 1789-1914; ISBN-13: 978-2757802267; Seuil
2) Berstein, Winock; Histoire de la France politique, tome 4, La République recommencée: 1914 à nos jours;
ISBN-13: 978-2757831656 or 9782757802274; Seuil

FREN6644A-L14

CRN: 60550

The History of Québec

Quebec is a unique society which was born and has evolved at the crossroads of two Occidental empires, France and Great-Britain. This course will cover the major periods in Quebec’s history from its origins as New France (1680-1760), to British North America (1763-1867), the Dominion of Canada (1867-1959), and modern Québec (1960-present). Since the French settlements along the banks of the Saint Lawrence River, Canadians of French origin had to defend their heritage in skirmishes and wars against various First Nation Peoples, British and English-Canadians. Because of this situation, they developed a unique culture, historically founded on the Catholic religion, the French language, and family values. It is interesting to note that Québec presently has health and educational systems unlike any other in North America as well as an unparalleled legal system for the protection of the French language. This course will also cover the critical moments in Québec’s quest for political independence which occurred during the past few decades (in the form of referendums). After nearly 400 years of existence in North America, Québec has become a modern society facing contemporary issues such as the environment, globalization, and a the transformation of social identity.

Required Text:
John A. Dickinson et Brian Young; Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec (4e édition) ISBN : 978-2-89448-602-3; Septentrion

FREN6645A-L14

CRN: 60551

Quebec's Cinema & Culture

Le Québec en images: cinéma québécois / Cinéma québécois

Quebec films offer a rich and diverse repertoire of works which delve primarily into the social identity of the largest French speaking culture in North America. Other predominate themes to be discussed focus more on the social and historical particularities of Quebec. These include: British colonization, Catholicism, winter, large families, the north, etc. This course will follow the evolution of film making in Quebec since its conception in the beginning of the 20th century and focus primarily on two defining decades. The first, known as the Quiet Revolution (1960-1980), is considered as the starting point of contemporary Quebecois cinema. From this period emerged the National Film Board of Canada, several of the Quebec’s most influential film producers: Jutra, Brault, Perreault, Carle, Arcand, etc., as well as various styles of cinematography, most notably, “cinema direct” or candid eye.

The second part, the New Generation (1990-2000) will show how a group of young filmmakers provided a second wind to an ailing industry. Through the use of more modern filming techniques, and a post-modern approach to script writing which focused less on social and political themes, they were instrumental in gaining international recognition for Quebecois cinema. For each period, we will discuss and analyze several film makers and their selected works.

Required Text:
Marcel Jean; Le cinéma québécois (nouvelle édition) ISBN 2-7646-0415-7; Éditions du Boréal

FREN6650A-L14

CRN: 60363

Mediterranean:Religion & Peace

Religions, Peace and Security in the Mediterranean Region

The longest non-resolved armed conflict of the XXth century, and probably of the XXIth century, is in the Mediterranean Region. It is not about a tension or about a dispute between two countries, but rather about a conflict among many countries of the region. The advent of the Arab Spring permits a new glance at the democratization of the Arab societies and their commitment (or not) to an inter-religious and inter-state long-term peace. In this context, we will first examine the various stages of the diverse conflicts and their evolution in the Middle East region. Secondly, by studying resolutions of the UN concerning these issues, we will analyze the experiences, the challenges and their implications for international relations, including the U.S. Finally, we shall observe the complexities of connections between the religious and cultural minorities within these Mediterranean countries.

No textbook required

FREN6665A-L14

CRN: 60443

The Extreme Right:France & Eur

The Extreme Right in France and Europe: Definition and Analysis

N.B. This course meets from July 24 to August 13, 2 hours per day.

After the local elections of March 2014 and the European elections of May 2014, the time has come for a balance sheet of the nationalist and populist forces in France and Europe. The course will tackle with the questions of terminology (extreme-right, radical right, nationalism, populism…), history of the nationalist political culture, ideological content of the programs, political organization of the parties, sociology of its supports and factors of the dynamics of this political family in a lot of European countries.

Required Text:
1) Pascal Perrineau, La France au Front. Essai sur l’avenir du Front national, Paris, Fayard, 2014 (ISBN 978-2-213-68103-0)
2) Hans Georg Betz, La droite populiste en Europe, Extrême et démocrate ?, Paris, Autrement, 2004 (ISBN 2-7467-0451-X)

FREN6668A-L14

CRN: 60371

History of Europe:16-21C

In the late Middle Ages, the so-called ""Christian West"" saw a considerable change. Europe is constructing itself and starting to conquer the world. Technical, artistic and religious revolutions participate in this extraordinary expansion. For four centuries, a European model of “civilization” has been taking place. But this creative power does not exist without tensions, without challenges. The purpose of this course is to bring out the highlights of this adventure in order to understand the main mechanisms. The course is divided into four parts:
- The Renaissance: between civilization and violence
- The invention of Europe (seventeenth and eighteenth century)
- Europe, a universal power (eighteenth and early twentieth century)
- Europe between destruction and reinvention.

FREN6678A-L14

CRN: 60558

Individual & Collective Memory

N.B. This course will be offered from July 24 through August 15, 2 hours a day
*The Uses of the Past: Individual and Collective Memory*

Memory is a multifaceted concept that is often interchanged with other similar concepts and used as an equivalent: transmission, inheritance, tradition, history, and identity to cite the most obvious. But what is the specificity of memory? The principal aim of this course is to define the characteristics and functions of the different processes of remembering in both private and public spheres. The course focuses on two principal dimensions:
- Understanding individual familial memory and its role in the construction of social and personal identity
- Explaining the uses of collective memory and commemoration in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in France today
The general framework of the course is designed to integrate social and individual approaches to memory, drawing on a wide diversity of research and knowledge from the social sciences and history. It also develops broader approaches by analyzing examples from literature and cinema.

Required Text:
A.Muxel; ""Individu et mémoire familiale"", ISBN : 978-2-01-279318-7;Hachette, Collection Pluriel, 2007

FREN6679A-L14

CRN: 60302

Contemporary France

(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

France has gone through many changes, european integration, globalization, euro zone crisis. Despite all these changes, France has still the will to play a major role in the world. This role is based on its « soft power », that is to say its cultural and social model. The aim of this course is to give a general outlook of french culture and society in an era of globalization and crisis. We will focus mainly on demography, immigration, social stratification, educational system, religious beliefs, work and leisure, artistical trends, etc.

This course will be pluridisciplinary and we will always study these topics in their economical and historical context.

N.B. Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525)."

Required Text:
L'Etat de la France 2013-2014; ISBN 978-2-7071-7637-0; Editions la découverte

FREN6679B-L14

CRN: 60303

Contemporary France

(Section A - Methodology ; Section B - Civilization)

France has gone through many changes, european integration, globalization, euro zone crisis. Despite all these changes, France has still the will to play a major role in the world. This role is based on its « soft power », that is to say its cultural and social model. The aim of this course is to give a general outlook of french culture and society in an era of globalization and crisis. We will focus mainly on demography, immigration, social stratification, educational system, religious beliefs, work and leisure, artistical trends, etc.

This course will be pluridisciplinary and we will always study these topics in their economical and historical context.

N.B. Students who choose section A can validate their credits in methodology (equivalent to 6525)."

Required Text:
L'Etat de la France 2013-2014; ISBN 978-2-7071-7637-0; Editions la découverte

FREN6684A-L14

CRN: 60559

French Cultural Identities

French Cultural Identities

From the Renaissance onward, specific cultural and language politics has been imposed on the French territory at the expense of regional dialects. This politics was reinforced throughout the entire Ancien Régime and aggravated in the colonial empire era until the 20th century, when it eventually began to crumble due to the decolonization and uprising national and regional demands. Today, France finds itself in an era of strong individuality and communitarianism, responsible for a profusion of cultural identities at the heart of the European community, whose boundaries keep getting blurred.In order to better understand the question of the cultural and national identity, we will study, by looking into relevant texts, what being French and / or francophone has meant for five centuries.

FREN6687A-L14

CRN: 60440

Women in Mediterranean World

Woman’s Condition in the Mediterranean World: Modernity. Emancipations. Fundamentalism

The woman’s condition, in particular in the Middle East and in North Africa, is the object of numerous international reports and local and regional actions. If often in the West we assimilate the deterioration of the woman’s condition with regard to a civilization or to a religion, the reality is more complex. In this course we will examine the conditions of women in an evolutionary perspective through diverse civilizations and religions. In addition to a sociocultural perspective, we will study the public policies that have been organized in the Mediterranean Sea, both at the state level and at the regional level. Which are the key measures adopted by the Mediterranean States to favor the equality between men and women and the challenges that they face in the process of application of these actions? Finally the third part of this course will be dedicated to woman’s condition after the phenomenon of the Arab Spring and its impact on public liberties and women’s rights.

No textbook required

FREN6691A-L14

CRN: 60564

21C Fantasy Literature

FREN6691B-L14

CRN: 60565

21C Fantasy Literature

FREN6694A-L14

CRN: 60301

Second Language Acquisition

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the various factors that play a role in the processes of second language acquisition, particularly as it occurs in the classroom. Topics covered include language competence and proficiency, natural vs. classroom second language learning, language related features of second language acquisition (nature and function of the input, developmental stages, characteristics of learner interlanguage, first language transfer, etc.), individual characteristics of the learner, acquisition viewed as a cognitive activity, sociological, psychological and affective factors in second language acquisition, and current research in SLA and its application to teaching French as a second language.

No textbook required

FREN6722A-L14

CRN: 60560

Liberty and Libertines

The goal of this literature course is to examine the problematics of liberty and licentiousness through the study of the specific role of the subversif author. In the classical period, the word « libertine » is an insult, designating those who are reproached with an extreme liberty of conduct as well as thought. The work of « libertines » is thus always controversial: it must sidestep the different forms that repression or censureship might take, using forms of publication that avoid the mainstream and using irony to disguise intent. A variety of intellectual and philosophical references, styles and literary genres serve the “libertines”: lyrical works, novels, comedies, tragedies, travel narratives, pamphlets, philosophical essays or treatise. The study of the « libertine » allows for a singular point of view on a certain number of central notions: pleasure vs. moral code, order and disorder, rules and liberty, truth, plausibility and fiction, sensualism and eroticism, skepticism, etc.

In the light of these literary forms adopted by the “libertines”, our reflection will be organised chronologically and according to the literary genre rather than by theme, making it obvious that it is the writing that reveals the subversive message, while proposing a cultural and ironic complicity capable of concealing the great libertine themes.
We will base our study on
– a tragedy in verse: Les Amours tragiques de Pyrame et Thisbé de Théophile de Viau (photocopies)
– an imaginary travel in prose : Les Etats et Empires de la Lune de Cyrano de Bergerac (GF),
– a comedy in prose : Dom Juan de Molière (GF),
– libertine tales in verse : Jean de La Fontaine, Contes libertins (Librio)
– and one novel : Les Liaisons dangereuses de Laclos (Poche).
Excerpts from texts by Rabelais, Casanova, and Sade will complete our overview.
The goal of this literature course is to examine the problematics of liberty and licentiousness through the study of the specific role of the subversif author. In the classical period, the word « libertine » is an insult, designating those who are reproached with an extreme liberty of conduct as well as thought. The work of « libertines » is thus always controversial: it must sidestep the different forms that repression or censureship might take, using forms of publication that avoid the mainstream and using irony to disguise intent. A variety of intellectual and philosophical references, styles and literary genres serve the “libertines”: lyrical works, novels, comedies, tragedies, travel narratives, pamphlets, philosophical essays or treatise. The study of the « libertine » allows for a singular point of view on a certain number of central notions: pleasure vs. moral code, order and disorder, rules and liberty, truth, plausibility and fiction, sensualism and eroticism, skepticism, etc.
In the light of these literary forms adopted by the “libertines”, our reflection will be organised chronologically and according to the literary genre rather than by theme, making it obvious that it is the writing that reveals the subversive message, while proposing a cultural and ironic complicity capable of concealing the great libertine themes.
We will base our study on
– a tragedy in verse: Les Amours tragiques de Pyrame et Thisbé de Théophile de Viau (photocopies)
– an imaginary travel in prose : Les Etats et Empires de la Lune de Cyrano de Bergerac (GF),
– a comedy in prose : Dom Juan de Molière (GF),
– libertine tales in verse : Jean de La Fontaine, Contes libertins (Librio)
– and one novel : Les Liaisons dangereuses de Laclos (Poche).

Excerpts from texts by Rabelais, Casanova, and Sade will complete our overview.

FREN6722B-L14

CRN: 60561

Liberty and Libertines

The goal of this literature course is to examine the problematics of liberty and licentiousness through the study of the specific role of the subversif author. In the classical period, the word « libertine » is an insult, designating those who are reproached with an extreme liberty of conduct as well as thought. The work of « libertines » is thus always controversial: it must sidestep the different forms that repression or censureship might take, using forms of publication that avoid the mainstream and using irony to disguise intent. A variety of intellectual and philosophical references, styles and literary genres serve the “libertines”: lyrical works, novels, comedies, tragedies, travel narratives, pamphlets, philosophical essays or treatise. The study of the « libertine » allows for a singular point of view on a certain number of central notions: pleasure vs. moral code, order and disorder, rules and liberty, truth, plausibility and fiction, sensualism and eroticism, skepticism, etc.

In the light of these literary forms adopted by the “libertines”, our reflection will be organised chronologically and according to the literary genre rather than by theme, making it obvious that it is the writing that reveals the subversive message, while proposing a cultural and ironic complicity capable of concealing the great libertine themes.
We will base our study on
– a tragedy in verse: Les Amours tragiques de Pyrame et Thisbé de Théophile de Viau (photocopies)
– an imaginary travel in prose : Les Etats et Empires de la Lune de Cyrano de Bergerac (GF),
– a comedy in prose : Dom Juan de Molière (GF),
– libertine tales in verse : Jean de La Fontaine, Contes libertins (Librio)
– and one novel : Les Liaisons dangereuses de Laclos (Poche).
Excerpts from texts by Rabelais, Casanova, and Sade will complete our overview.
The goal of this literature course is to examine the problematics of liberty and licentiousness through the study of the specific role of the subversif author. In the classical period, the word « libertine » is an insult, designating those who are reproached with an extreme liberty of conduct as well as thought. The work of « libertines » is thus always controversial: it must sidestep the different forms that repression or censureship might take, using forms of publication that avoid the mainstream and using irony to disguise intent. A variety of intellectual and philosophical references, styles and literary genres serve the “libertines”: lyrical works, novels, comedies, tragedies, travel narratives, pamphlets, philosophical essays or treatise. The study of the « libertine » allows for a singular point of view on a certain number of central notions: pleasure vs. moral code, order and disorder, rules and liberty, truth, plausibility and fiction, sensualism and eroticism, skepticism, etc.
In the light of these literary forms adopted by the “libertines”, our reflection will be organised chronologically and according to the literary genre rather than by theme, making it obvious that it is the writing that reveals the subversive message, while proposing a cultural and ironic complicity capable of concealing the great libertine themes.
We will base our study on
– a tragedy in verse: Les Amours tragiques de Pyrame et Thisbé de Théophile de Viau (photocopies)
– an imaginary travel in prose : Les Etats et Empires de la Lune de Cyrano de Bergerac (GF),
– a comedy in prose : Dom Juan de Molière (GF),
– libertine tales in verse : Jean de La Fontaine, Contes libertins (Librio)
– and one novel : Les Liaisons dangereuses de Laclos (Poche).

Excerpts from texts by Rabelais, Casanova, and Sade will complete our overview.

FREN6724A-L14

CRN: 60453

Life & Work Amadou Hampate Ba

FREN6900A-L14

CRN: 60190

Research Paper