Middlebury Language Schools

 

Sílvia Oliveira has a Licenciatura from the University of Porto, Portugal in Modern Languages and Literatures. She has a PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in Hispanic Languages and Literatures. Her dissertation is on narrative and resistance in Portugal in the 1950s and 1960s, focusing on the short story. She has taught at Purdue University (Indiana) where she implemented a minor in Brazilian, Portuguese, and African Lusophone cultures. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Portuguese at Rhode Island College where she coordinates the Portuguese Program. She will be teaching Level 1, one module of Lusophone African culture, and a graduate class on Luso-African Poetry. She will be in charge of volleyball and tennis at the Portuguese School.

 

Courses


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PGSE 3101 - Beginning Portuguese      

This course sequence is designed for students with no previous classroom instruction or functional ability in Portuguese, and little or no previous experience in another Romance Language. Students are exposed to intensive grammar instruction to develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Most students completing this course sequence will be able to initiate, sustain, and close a conversation dealing with familiar topics, and will be able to write short narratives and read authentic texts based on specific reading strategies. Based on data gathered during the previous Portuguese School summers, the majority of students completing this level achieved Intermediate levels in the final oral assessment.

Basic bibliography: Pastreau, C. et al. Ponto de Encontro: Portuguese as a World Language. 2nd. Edition, Prentice Hall, 2012.

Set with Textbook, SAM, answer key, and Portuguese-English dictionary. SAM and answer key may be Brazilian Port. or European Port., depending on the variant student wants to emphasize.

Summer 2014 Language Schools

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PGSE 3102 - Beginning Portuguese      

This course sequence is designed for students with no previous classroom instruction or functional ability in Portuguese, and little or no previous experience in another Romance Language. Students are exposed to intensive grammar instruction to develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Most students completing this course sequence will be able to initiate, sustain, and close a conversation dealing with familiar topics, and will be able to write short narratives and read authentic texts based on specific reading strategies. Based on data gathered during the previous Portuguese School summers, the majority of students completing this level achieved Intermediate levels in the final oral assessment.

Basic bibliography: Pastreau, C. et al. Ponto de Encontro: Portuguese as a World Language. 2nd. Edition, Prentice Hall, 2012.

Set with Textbook, SAM, answer key, and Portuguese-English dictionary. SAM and answer key may be Brazilian Port. or European Port., depending on the variant student wants to emphasize.

Summer 2014 Language Schools

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PGSE 3399 - Cultural Studies 3.5      

This course sequence is intended for students who have had the equivalent to three to four semesters of formal instruction in Portuguese, and it is designed to expand the PSGE 3398 course. In addition to the contact with language structures through intensive reading and to the exposure to different registers, students enrolled in this program will also develop their intercultural competence through courses divided into thematic-culture related units that are team-taught by faculty and experts from different areas of studies. These thematic units encompass several topics, such as literature of the Portuguese-speaking countries, providing students with different concepts and perspectives, as well as with the development of intercultural sensibility. These content courses may include components such as theoretical readings, critical discussions, debates, and writings, exposing students to cultural products and practices of the Lusophone world. This course sequence is not offered every summer. Bibliography for PGSE 3399/3400 will vary each year.

Summer 2014 Language Schools

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PGSE 3400 - Cultural Studies 3.5      

This course sequence is intended for students who have had the equivalent to three to four semesters of formal instruction in Portuguese, and it is designed to expand the PSGE 3398 course. In addition to the contact with language structures through intensive reading and to the exposure to different registers, students enrolled in this program will also develop their intercultural competence through courses divided into thematic-culture related units that are team-taught by faculty and experts from different areas of studies. These thematic units encompass several topics, such as literature of the Portuguese-speaking countries, providing students with different concepts and perspectives, as well as with the development of intercultural sensibility. These content courses may include components such as theoretical readings, critical discussions, debates, and writings, exposing students to cultural products and practices of the Lusophone world. This course sequence is not offered every summer. Bibliography for PGSE 3399/3400 will vary each year.

Summer 2014 Language Schools

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PGSE 3428 - Lusophone Poetry      

Poetry of the Lusophone World

This course is offered at the undergraduate level with a particular focus on the study of the poetry produced in the Portuguese-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to the genre by the analysis of the production of different groups of poets, which include authors from Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese Africa, exploring their socio-political-racial-gender and aesthetic traits. In addition to the reading and discussion of the selected material, the course also includes theoretical texts with different approaches, in order to promote a deeper understanding of the poetic production within its historical, political, economic, and cultural realities, such as colonization, decolonization, postcolonial lusophone studies, the lusophone diaspora, and the construction of national identity. Bibliography will vary each year.

Summer 2014 Language Schools

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