Newsroom

November 6, 1998

"The Holocaust: Whose History Is It?" is the Topic of a Lecture and Symposium at Middlebury College on Nov. 15

Middlebury College will host a symposium-"The Holocaust: Whose History Is It?"-on Sunday, Nov. 15. The event, the 2nd Silberman Symposium in Jewish Studies, will consist of the 12th annual Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies and a panel discussion. Both the lecture and the panel discussion are free and open to the public and will take place in the library of the Geonomics Center for International Studies on Hillcrest Road off College Street (Route 125).

At 4 p.m. Margot Strom will begin the symposium with the keynote lecture. Strom is the founder and director of the Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation, a nonprofit professional development organization committed to assisting teachers' efforts to help students make essential connections between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives. Now three decades old, the foundation reaches an estimated 900,000 students annually through 21,000 educators across the United States, Canada, and Europe.

At 7:30 p.m., there will be a panel discussion. Strom will then respond to remarks made by Middlebury College faculty serving as panelists: Marjorie Lamberti, Charles A. Dana Professor of History; Stephen Donadio, professor of American literature, and editor of the New England Review; and Michael Kraus, professor of political science. Robert S. Schine, Curt C. and Else Silberman Professor of Jewish Studies, and dean of the faculty, will serve as the moderator.

Margot Strom and the Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation

With colleagues on the staff of Facing History, Strom is the author and co-author of numerous books and other educational materials designed to bring education about democratic citizenship into classrooms. These educational resources include the organization's three principal books, "Facing History and Ourselves: Holocaust and Human Behavior," "Elements of Time," and "Choosing to Participate."

In 1996, Strom led Facing Historyís effort to establish a training component for police academy recruits through the Boston Police Department. That program has now been funded by the United States Justice Department and will be extended to police academies all over the country.

Silberman Symposium

The Silberman Symposium is supported by the fund for the Curt C. and Else Silberman Chair in Jewish Studies. Establishing the fund in 1994, Curt Silberman said, "Our intention is not to sponsor a chair for Jewish students and Jewish studies per se. What is intended is the creation of a forum for students of all creeds and religions and even non-believers, which would become at the same time a kind of community forum with scholars, professors, lecturers, and citizens at large as participants." One of the mandates of the chair is "the study of Jewish history with emphasis on modern Jewish history, and the Holocaust as deterrent to prejudice and bias. It should further deal with Ö the phenomenon of anti-Semitism as a barometer of the health of a society." Its goal is universal: to contribute "toward better understanding of each other."

Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies

The Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies was established by Eliot Levinson, a member of the Middlebury College class of 1964, and his family to honor his mother, Hannah A. Quint. Its purpose is to provoke interest in and to deepen understanding of Jewish culture, of the religion, the history, and the literature of the Jews, and to bring a Jewish perspective to bear on ethical and political questions. One of its goals is to draw not only the Middlebury College community, but the people of the town and region into the discussion and debate.

For more information, contact Robert S. Schine of the Middlebury College religion department at 802-443-5391.

Schedule of Events:

Sunday, Nov. 15

4 p.m. Keynote lecture: "The Holocaust: Whose History Is It?," Margot Strom, founder and director of the Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation.

7:30 p.m. Panel Discussion: "The Holocaust: Whose History Is It?," Panelists are Middlebury College faculty: Marjorie Lamberti, Charles A. Dana Professor of History; Stephen Donadio, professor of American literature, and editor of the New England Review; and Michael Kraus, professor of political science. Robert S. Schine, Curt C. and Else Silberman Professor of Jewish Studies, and dean of the faculty, will serve as the moderator.

Both events are free and open to the public and will take place in the library of the Geonomics Center for International Studies on Hillcrest Road off College Street (Route 125).

For more information, contact Robert S. Schine of the Middlebury College religion department at 802-443-5391.