Middlebury

November 2, 2001

Contact: Adrianne Tucker
802-443-5629
tucky@middlebury.edu
Posted: November 2, 2001

"Brain drain is a complicated issue—for many students here, going home is not an option."
---Akosua Nyako, Middlebury College senior from Ghana

MIDDLEBURY, VT - An African and Caribbean symposium titled "Brain Drain: Where are the African and Caribbean Countries Heading Economically and Culturally?" will take place at Middlebury College on Nov. 16-17. All events are free and open to the public.

This year, the African and Caribbean students at Middlebury College have collaborated to present a symposium on an issue of concern to both regions, "brain drain." The phenomenon occurs when large segments of a country’s educated and skilled labor population emigrates in pursuit of a wider range of opportunities found in other countries. According to Middlebury College senior Akosua Nyako from Ghana, brain drain also presents a difficult dilemma for many international students studying in the United States, torn between concern for their home countries’ developmental welfare, and the progress of their own successful career paths. "Brain drain is a complicated issue—for many students here, going home is not an option," said Nyako. "However, it is imperative that we as the next generation realize the toll this exodus is taking on our countries, and find ways to rectify it," she said.

On Saturday, Nov. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 110 of the Sunderland Language Center on College Street (Route 125), "Clando," a film directed by Jean-Marie Téno, will serve as an introduction to the issue of brain drain in Africa. According to the "Library of African Cinema 2000," "Director Téno wrestles with a dilemma facing more and more educated Africans: whether to fight the autocratic regimes at home or seek their fortunes abroad."

On Friday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. the symposium will officially open with a lecture titled "Brain Drain: Where are the African and Caribbean Countries Headed Economically and Culturally?" The event will feature two main speakers, Elizabeth Thomas-Hope and Moustapha Diouf, who will address the issue from the Caribbean and African perspectives, respectively. A short question and answer session will follow. The lecture will take place in Room 216 of Bicentennial Hall on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125).

Thomas-Hope of the University of West Indies is the James Seivright Moss-Solomon Professor of Environmental Management, director of the environmental studies unit, and department head of geology and geography. A Jamaican social geographer, she is an expert on population, mobility and development in the Caribbean. She is also the author of many books, including: "Explanation in Caribbean Migration" (1992), "The Impact of Migration in the Receiving Countries: The United Kingdom" (1994), "Perspectives on Caribbean Regional Identity" (1994) and "A Geography of the Third World" (1996).

Diouf is an associate professor at the University of Vermont who specializes in rural sociology, and social change and development in the Third World. He has previously worked for UNESCO’s social science research department in Senegal. Diouf has published articles related to the sociology of development in Third World countries and has presented talks on a variety of issues such as the myths and realities of the African crisis, and social change and development perspectives in Senegal.

On Saturday, Nov. 17, at 1 p.m., the symposium will continue with a panel discussion titled "Brain Drain: A Global Phenomenon" in the seminar room of the Robert A. Jones House on Hillcrest Road off College Street (Route 125). Middlebury College Visiting Professor of Economics David Horlacher and Middlebury student representatives from different regions around the world will join Thomas-Hope and Diouf on a panel to discuss the issue.

Later that night, at 8 p.m. in McCullough Student Center on Old Chapel Road off Route 30, Middlebury students will present a program titled "Cultural Explosion," featuring an original play "Being and Belonging." Written and directed by Middlebury College students, the play is a story of love, loss and self-discovery. Following the play, students will perform original choreographed dances derived from traditional and popular African and Caribbean forms. Students will also sing and read poems. A DJ dance party featuring mainly African and Caribbean music starting at 10:30 p.m. will complete this evening of exploration of African and Caribbean cultures.

For more information contact student organizer Agnes Mwakingwe at (802)-443-6809.

Calendar Events Listing

"Brain Drain: Where are the African and Caribbean Countries Heading Economically and Culturally?"

Middlebury College Campus

November 16-17

All symposium events are free and open to the public

 

Saturday, Nov. 10

7:30 p.m. Film: "Clando" directed by Jean Marie Téno wrestles with a dilemma facing more and more educated Africans: whether to fight the autocratic regimes at home or seek their fortunes abroad.

 Room 110 of Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, College Street (Route 125)

 

Friday, Nov. 16

7:30 p.m., Lecture: "Brain Drain: Where are African and Caribbean Countries Heading Economically and Culturally?" featuring two speakers: Elizabeth Thomas-Hope, a professor of geography at the University of West Indies, and Moustafa Diouf, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Vermont

Room 216 of Bicentennial Hall on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125)

 

Saturday, Nov.17

1 p.m. Panel Discussion: "Brain Drain: A Global Phenomenon?"

Middlebury College Visiting Professor of Economics David Horlacher, and Middlebury student representatives from different regions around the world, will join Elizabeth Thomas-Hope, a professor of geography at the University of West Indies, and Moustapha Diouf, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Vermont, in a panel to discuss the issue.

 Seminar Room of Robert A. Jones House on Hillcrest Road off College Street (Route 125)

8 p.m. Cultural Show: "Cultural Explosion!" featuring an original play "Being and Belonging," original choreographed African and Caribbean dances, songs and poetry.

McCullough Student Center on Old Chapel Road off Route 30

10:30 p.m. DJ Dance Party featuring mainly African and Caribbean Music

McCullough Student Center on Old Chapel Road off Route 30

Communications Office

802-443-5500