COVID-19 Updates: Fall Semester

New space for queer studies is one student’s legacy

On a typical Thursday evening, senior Christine Bachman is busy hosting students at the Queer Studies House, a residential academic interest house with a focus on queer studies. These evenings are called “Thursday Teas.” Sipping tea and eating cookies, Bachman and the four other residents of the house start informal conversations on a variety of topics related to queer studies, an emerging interdisciplinary field that critiques traditional norms of sexuality and gender. Sometimes, as many as 30 or 40 students stop by for these gatherings.

“Students get to know and relate to each other on a personal level that in turn enables a safe, open, varied discussion about issues of difference,” explains sophomore Catarina Campbell, who frequently attends these gatherings.

As co-president of the Middlebury Open-Queer Alliance (MOQA), Bachman was one of the three chief architects of the proposal for the Queer Studies House. The proposal was approved by Community Council last year.

Students honored at 16th annual Public Service Leadership Awards event

Forty-seven Middlebury College students and two student organizations were honored for their volunteerism at the 16th annual Public Service Leadership Awards reception held April 29 at the McCullough Student Center.

The students were nominated by service agencies throughout Addison County, by local individuals, and by their peers. All of the nominees received certificates from President Ronald D. Liebowitz and recognition from the more than 100 students, faculty, staff, and community members in attendance at the dinner.

Middlebury men’s rugby captures second Division II national championship

Middlebury defeated Georgetown in Friday's semifinal and Wisconsin in Saturday's national championship game, giving the Panthers their second Division II national title in three years.

In their third straight trip to the “Big Four,” Middlebury regained the title they last won in 2007 on the same field at Stanford University’s Steuber Stadium.

Student, professor land $50K state grant for iPhone start-up business

A start-up company founded by Middlebury Associate Professor of Computer Science Tim Huang and Bevan Barton, a junior computer science major from Oakland, Calif., has received a a grant for $50,000 through the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET). Barton and Huang founded the company Appstone to create products that will help aspiring software developers learn to make applications for the Apple iPhone.

Vermont Governor James Douglas announced the Appstone grant at the fourth annual Invention to Venture Conference on April 28 at the University of Vermont’s Davis Center. A second grant was presented to the company Hoozinga, which is comprised of students and faculty from Champlain College’s Gaming and Emergent Media Program.

Two Middlebury seniors awarded Compton Mentor Fellowships

Middlebury College seniors Walter “Tripp” Burwell of Raleigh, N.C., and Corinne Almquist of Randolph, N.J., have been selected from a national pool of nominees to receive the Compton Mentor Fellowship. The Compton Foundation, based in Redwood City, Calif., created the Mentor Fellowship Program to support the creativity and commitment of graduating seniors as they move beyond academics and into the world. The fellowship lasts for one year, with a stipend of $35,000, beginning and ending at the annual mid-June gathering of fellows held in the San Francisco area.

Senior earns Watson Fellowship for year-long study of island cultures

Aylie Baker, a senior from Yarmouth, Maine, is the latest Middlebury student to receive the prestigious Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, which funds a year of post-undergraduate independent study outside the United States. She begins her travels in July and plans research visits to the Maldives, the Canaries, the Chiloé Archipelago and Palau, where she will record numerous audio interviews. She hopes the recordings will have value both for the communities she visits and for her own continued research at home.

Baker says growing up in Maine, with its more than 4,000 coastal islands, gave her a deep appreciation for island life and culture. She believes the rugged challenges faced by islanders, combined with inflated costs for goods, results in innovation by necessity.

Middlebury senior named to USA Today’s All-USA Academic First Team

Middlebury senior Carrie Bryant of Wellesley Hills, Mass., is one of 20 college students named to the elite USA Today College Academic First Team, which was announced by the McLean, Va., based newspaper on April 29. Now in its 20th year, the $2,500 award recognizes students for outstanding intellectual achievement and leadership.

A classics major with a 3.91 grade point average, Bryant has numerous honors and awards at Middlebury College including the 2009 Jason B. Fleishman Award; the Eaton Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Classics; and Charles A. Dana Scholar for academic achievement potential for leadership and accomplishment. She will begin graduate studies in Latin language and literature at Oxford University this fall.

Middlebury team places first at 2009 computer programming competition

For the third year in a row, a group of three Middlebury College students finished first in a computer programming contest held on April 24 at SUNY Plattsburgh in New York. The Middlebury team included juniors Toby Norden and Scott Wehrwein, and sophomore David Fouhey. The group was coached by Middlebury College Associate Professor of Computer Science Tim Huang and Associate Professor of Mathematics Frank Swenton.

The annual competition, conducted by the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Northeast Region (CCSCNE), tests students’ abilities to work collaboratively within a limited time to develop computer programs for specific problems.

Student co-authors N.Y. Times op-ed column on democracy in Afghanistan

By NADER NADERY and HASEEB HUMAYOON [Class of '09]

LAST November, extremists on motorbikes opposed to education for women sprayed acid on a group of students from the Mirwais School for Girls in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Several young women were severely burned. Yet it did not take more than a few weeks for even the most cruelly disfigured girls to return to school. Like the crowds of women in Kabul this week who protested a new law that restricts their rights, the Mirwais students demonstrate unbending courage and resolve for progress. They don’t fear much — except that the world might abandon them.

That is why President Obama’s Afghanistan-Pakistan policy speech last month and his administration’s related white paper are worrisome: both avoided any reference to democracy in Afghanistan, while pointedly pushing democratic reforms in Pakistan.

Spring student symposium April 17 showcases undergraduate research

On Friday, April 17, from 1-7 p.m., more than 100 Middlebury College students will showcase the results of their recent research efforts as part of the third annual Middlebury College Spring Student Symposium. The symposium will highlight student work through a mix of lectures, performances, posters, artwork and readings. The presentations will take place in the Great Hall and various classrooms of McCardell Bicentennial Hall, located on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125). All events are free and open to the public.

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