Middlebury

History & Traditions

Middlebury is a liberal arts college of the first rank, an achievement that is the result of a process of growth and change that began in 1800, when a few men of the town of Middlebury took upon themselves the challenge of building a college in a small New England town, on what was then the American frontier. Over the more than two centuries since it was established, Middlebury has developed from "the town's college" into an institution of international renown.

History of the Farm

The Middlebury College Organic Farm (MCOF) is a relatively new addition to the college that began with the vision and enthusiasm of just a few individuals.  Below you can find a brief time-line of MCOF's history.

The study of classics at Middlebury provides you both with intellectual skills that are useful in any career, and with the experience of ideas that will enrich your thinking about life and the world around you.

Student blogs about his experience studying abroad in France

George Altshuler '10 blogs about his experience studying abroad in France. Expect thoughts on museums, politics, education, and history.

Professor's book focuses on mapping, surveying in Sri Lanka

In 2008, Ian Barrow published a book on Surveying and Mapping in Colonial Sri Lanka (Oxford University Press). It's the first in-depth account and assessment of the colonial survey department during the nineteenth century. My research for the book and developing interest in Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon) has prompted me to offer a course on Sri Lankan history in Spring 2010. My book will probably be one of the texts.

Professor researches South Asia's 'assassination museums'

Professor Ian Barrow's current research is for a book on 'assassination museums' -- museums in South Asia that are dedicated to recent leaders who have been assassinated. "As a historian, I am particularly interested in the ways the leaders' legacies are displayed and taught through the often macabre exhibits (e.g. bits of flesh or spots of blood or bullet holes are preserved in the museums, which are often the locations of the assassinations)," Barrow says. "But I'm also fascinated by what's left out, and what that means for our understanding of the leaders."