Middlebury

Internship Interviews

During the application process, you may be required to interview with potential internship supervisors.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will arrange the interviews for you and may accompany you to these interviews. S/he will explain the goals and requirements of the internship to your potential supervisor and will give them your resume. You should be prepared to discuss your goals and interests, and what you hope to both contribute and gain from the internship.

Here are some points to remember during the interviews:

  • Each interview is different, but the main objective is for you to persuade the supervisor that s/he should accept you for the intern position.
  • Think about your interests, skills, training, and work experience, and how you will convey these in the interview.
  • Express your interest in particular projects or tasks; and do not be afraid to ask questions. Let the interviewer know what you would be interested in doing as an intern and how you would be an asset to his/her organization.
  • The Director/Internship Coordinator will provide you with information about the organization prior to your interview. Review this information before the interview, and prepare several questions to ask about the organization (its purpose and activities), your duties and responsibilities, and the type of projects in which you may be involved.
  • Do not be late to your interview, and by all means, do not miss your interview. Confirm arrangements with the Director/Internship Coordinator about the time, place, and person who will interview you. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make the appointment, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know right away so the interview can be rescheduled.
  • Dress neatly and make yourself presentable. Appropriate attire varies depending on the type of work environment, so discuss this with the Director/Internship Coordinator.
  • Be sure to show your enthusiasm! Explain why this particular internship is of interest to you, and how it will help you work towards your future personal and professional goals.

Remember: An internship interview is like a job interview, and the interviewer is under no obligation to accept you for the position. You have to demonstrate that you are a viable candidate.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Internship Interviews

During the application process, you may be required to interview with potential internship supervisors.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will arrange the interviews for you and may accompany you to these interviews. S/he will explain the goals and requirements of the internship to your potential supervisor and will give them your resume. You should be prepared to discuss your goals and interests, and what you hope to both contribute and gain from the internship.

Here are some points to remember during the interviews:

  • Each interview is different, but the main objective is for you to persuade the supervisor that s/he should accept you for the intern position.
  • Think about your interests, skills, training, and work experience, and how you will convey these in the interview.
  • Express your interest in particular projects or tasks; and do not be afraid to ask questions. Let the interviewer know what you would be interested in doing as an intern and how you would be an asset to his/her organization.
  • The Director/Internship Coordinator will provide you with information about the organization prior to your interview. Review this information before the interview, and prepare several questions to ask about the organization (its purpose and activities), your duties and responsibilities, and the type of projects in which you may be involved.
  • Do not be late to your interview, and by all means, do not miss your interview. Confirm arrangements with the Director/Internship Coordinator about the time, place, and person who will interview you. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make the appointment, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know right away so the interview can be rescheduled.
  • Dress neatly and make yourself presentable. Appropriate attire varies depending on the type of work environment, so discuss this with the Director/Internship Coordinator.
  • Be sure to show your enthusiasm! Explain why this particular internship is of interest to you, and how it will help you work towards your future personal and professional goals.

Remember: An internship interview is like a job interview, and the interviewer is under no obligation to accept you for the position. You have to demonstrate that you are a viable candidate.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Internship Interviews

During the application process, you may be required to interview with potential internship supervisors.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will arrange the interviews for you and may accompany you to these interviews. S/he will explain the goals and requirements of the internship to your potential supervisor and will give them your resume. You should be prepared to discuss your goals and interests, and what you hope to both contribute and gain from the internship.

Here are some points to remember during the interviews:

  • Each interview is different, but the main objective is for you to persuade the supervisor that s/he should accept you for the intern position.
  • Think about your interests, skills, training, and work experience, and how you will convey these in the interview.
  • Express your interest in particular projects or tasks; and do not be afraid to ask questions. Let the interviewer know what you would be interested in doing as an intern and how you would be an asset to his/her organization.
  • The Director/Internship Coordinator will provide you with information about the organization prior to your interview. Review this information before the interview, and prepare several questions to ask about the organization (its purpose and activities), your duties and responsibilities, and the type of projects in which you may be involved.
  • Do not be late to your interview, and by all means, do not miss your interview. Confirm arrangements with the Director/Internship Coordinator about the time, place, and person who will interview you. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make the appointment, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know right away so the interview can be rescheduled.
  • Dress neatly and make yourself presentable. Appropriate attire varies depending on the type of work environment, so discuss this with the Director/Internship Coordinator.
  • Be sure to show your enthusiasm! Explain why this particular internship is of interest to you, and how it will help you work towards your future personal and professional goals.

Remember: An internship interview is like a job interview, and the interviewer is under no obligation to accept you for the position. You have to demonstrate that you are a viable candidate.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Internship Interviews

During the application process, you may be required to interview with potential internship supervisors.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will arrange the interviews for you and may accompany you to these interviews. S/he will explain the goals and requirements of the internship to your potential supervisor and will give them your resume. You should be prepared to discuss your goals and interests, and what you hope to both contribute and gain from the internship.

Here are some points to remember during the interviews:

  • Each interview is different, but the main objective is for you to persuade the supervisor that s/he should accept you for the intern position.
  • Think about your interests, skills, training, and work experience, and how you will convey these in the interview.
  • Express your interest in particular projects or tasks; and do not be afraid to ask questions. Let the interviewer know what you would be interested in doing as an intern and how you would be an asset to his/her organization.
  • The Director/Internship Coordinator will provide you with information about the organization prior to your interview. Review this information before the interview, and prepare several questions to ask about the organization (its purpose and activities), your duties and responsibilities, and the type of projects in which you may be involved.
  • Do not be late to your interview, and by all means, do not miss your interview. Confirm arrangements with the Director/Internship Coordinator about the time, place, and person who will interview you. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make the appointment, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know right away so the interview can be rescheduled.
  • Dress neatly and make yourself presentable. Appropriate attire varies depending on the type of work environment, so discuss this with the Director/Internship Coordinator.
  • Be sure to show your enthusiasm! Explain why this particular internship is of interest to you, and how it will help you work towards your future personal and professional goals.

Remember: An internship interview is like a job interview, and the interviewer is under no obligation to accept you for the position. You have to demonstrate that you are a viable candidate.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Internship Interviews

During the application process, you may be required to interview with potential internship supervisors.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will arrange the interviews for you and may accompany you to these interviews. S/he will explain the goals and requirements of the internship to your potential supervisor and will give them your resume. You should be prepared to discuss your goals and interests, and what you hope to both contribute and gain from the internship.

Here are some points to remember during the interviews:

  • Each interview is different, but the main objective is for you to persuade the supervisor that s/he should accept you for the intern position.
  • Think about your interests, skills, training, and work experience, and how you will convey these in the interview.
  • Express your interest in particular projects or tasks; and do not be afraid to ask questions. Let the interviewer know what you would be interested in doing as an intern and how you would be an asset to his/her organization.
  • The Director/Internship Coordinator will provide you with information about the organization prior to your interview. Review this information before the interview, and prepare several questions to ask about the organization (its purpose and activities), your duties and responsibilities, and the type of projects in which you may be involved.
  • Do not be late to your interview, and by all means, do not miss your interview. Confirm arrangements with the Director/Internship Coordinator about the time, place, and person who will interview you. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make the appointment, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know right away so the interview can be rescheduled.
  • Dress neatly and make yourself presentable. Appropriate attire varies depending on the type of work environment, so discuss this with the Director/Internship Coordinator.
  • Be sure to show your enthusiasm! Explain why this particular internship is of interest to you, and how it will help you work towards your future personal and professional goals.

Remember: An internship interview is like a job interview, and the interviewer is under no obligation to accept you for the position. You have to demonstrate that you are a viable candidate.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Internship Opportunities

While we do our best to assist students interested in pursuing an internship, we cannot guarantee an internship placement. The application process is competitive, and only qualified candidates will ultimately be offered an internship.

Internship possibilities span a wide range, and vary from site to site, but generally include government agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses, the media, educational organizations, and the arts.  Recent students have participated in internships in Spain at FUNDESO (Fundacion Desarrollo Sostenido), WWB (Women's World Banking), Hilti Española S.A., and ACNUR (Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para Refugiados). In Italy, students participated in internships in the American Consulate in Florence and the Horne Museum. In France, students have interned in the Assemblée Nationale, the Conseil Régional d'Ile de France, Maria Louisa Design, Frac I'le de France, the Robert Schuman Foundation, and Theatre et Cinema Ile de France. And in Russia students have interned at CNN, NPR, The United States-Russia Investment Fund, The MacArthur Foundation, Project Harmony, The Golden Ring newspaper, The American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, The Eurasia Foundation, The Moscow Institute of Modern Art, Yaroslavl Investment Center, as well as local schools and libraries. In any given year, however, we cannot guarantee an internship in a specific field or organization, though we will make every effort to accommodate. Please be aware that prospective internship providers normally expect candidates to have appropriate skills or background knowledge and interest in the field. In addition, students must have strong functional skills in the target language. If your language skills are not strong enough, you may not qualify for an internship.

Not-for Credit Internships

Students may chose to pursue an internship for the experience alone, and not for academic credit.

Such interns will still be required to fulfill a variety of assignments, minus the formal academic paper:

  • Students will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • In addition, interns must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship for posting on our webpage (in English).
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.

Study Abroad Policy

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry recognizes the value of study abroad as part of a general liberal arts education. However, study abroad can be highly disruptive to the chemistry or biochemistry major if not carried out with suitable planning, due to the significant differences in the structure of science curricula in different institutions and nations. In accordance with College procedure, courses for major credit will require both prior permission from the department chair, and the student will have to return to campus with all course materials including texts, notes syllabi, and graded work in order for the department to determine if major credit is warranted. Prior approval of a course for major credit does not guarantee it will be accepted for major credit upon the student's return.

Acceleration of the chemistry major during the first two years can lead to greater study abroad options. Freshmen hoping to study abroad as juniors, who also have advanced placement credit in chemistry can facilitate the process by enrolling in CH 107 in the fall, CH 241 in winter term (when available) and CH 242 in the spring, allowing them to get a "year ahead" in major courses.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study at a C.V. Starr-Middlebury School Abroad for one semester may do so in the spring of their junior year. It is not required that majors take any courses towards their major when enrolled in these programs. Recent changes in the Schools Abroad have made laboratory science courses available to Middlebury students enrolled in these programs, if they so desire.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in a Middlebury School Abroad for the entire junior year or junior year, fall semester may do so only if they have completed virtually all of the junior year courses by the end of their sophomore year, which can only be accomplished through a combination of advanced placement and program acceleration.  It is not required that majors take any courses towards their major when enrolled in these programs. Recent changes in the Schools Abroad have made laboratory science courses available to Middlebury students enrolled in these programs, if they so desire.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in English-speaking nations for one semester may do so in the spring of their junior year. At least one, and not more than three courses taken must be for major credit.  At least one major credit course taken must be in a topic not covered in the Middlebury College curriculum.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in English-speaking nations for the entire junior year may do so, but this is only possible through significant program acceleration and very careful planning.  This option, which would most commonly take place in the U.K., is complicated by the major differences in the structure of undergraduate education between the U.S. and U. K.  At least one, and not more than three courses taken must be for major credit. .  At least one major credit course taken must be in a topic not covered in the Middlebury College curriculum.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in non-English speaking nations in programs other than Middlebury Schools Abroad may do so only the most extraordinary of circumstances.

The Department currently has no formal mechanism for recommending programs or courses, as the number of majors studying abroad has historically been too low to gather any meaningful data.

While the department will do its best to help students chose appropriate courses, study abroad is a student's choice, and it is their responsibility to insure that they have the necessary courses for graduation and to prepare them for any independent study or research they might undertake when they return.

Schools Abroad / Study Abroad Program

Internship Opportunities

While we do our best to assist students interested in pursuing an internship, we cannot guarantee an internship placement. The application process is competitive, and only qualified candidates will ultimately be offered an internship.

Internship possibilities span a wide range, and vary from site to site, but generally include government agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses, the media, educational organizations, and the arts.  Recent students have participated in internships in Spain at FUNDESO (Fundacion Desarrollo Sostenido), WWB (Women's World Banking), Hilti Española S.A., and ACNUR (Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para Refugiados). In Italy, students participated in internships in the American Consulate in Florence and the Horne Museum. In France, students have interned in the Assemblée Nationale, the Conseil Régional d'Ile de France, Maria Louisa Design, Frac I'le de France, the Robert Schuman Foundation, and Theatre et Cinema Ile de France. And in Russia students have interned at CNN, NPR, The United States-Russia Investment Fund, The MacArthur Foundation, Project Harmony, The Golden Ring newspaper, The American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, The Eurasia Foundation, The Moscow Institute of Modern Art, Yaroslavl Investment Center, as well as local schools and libraries. In any given year, however, we cannot guarantee an internship in a specific field or organization, though we will make every effort to accommodate. Please be aware that prospective internship providers normally expect candidates to have appropriate skills or background knowledge and interest in the field. In addition, students must have strong functional skills in the target language. If your language skills are not strong enough, you may not qualify for an internship.

Student takes part in panel discussion during her time studying abroad in Chile

Middlebury student Kate Macfarlane '10 appears in a South American newspaper Web site, El Diario Austral de Valdivia, as part of a panel discussion, "Ciencia Con Nombre de Mujer" on the International Day of the Woman as part of her for-credit internship experience during her time studying at the School Abroad in Chile. See link below. Kate is seated at center.