Contact Information for Internships in Latin America

International Programs & Off-Campus Study - to speak to the coordinator of the School in Latin America
Tel: 802.443.5745

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Argentina) - Juan Hurtado, Internship supervisor
Tel: 011.54.11.5238.3000; jhurtado@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Brazil, and Uruguay) - Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director
Tel: 011.54.11.4671.0731; cgonzal@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Chile and Mexico) - Jeff Stevenson, Director
Tel: 011.56.2.233.9076; jstevens@middlebury.edu

Career Services Office - for advice and counseling
Tel: 802.443.5100; careerservices@middlebury.edu; web site

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Evaluation & Other Requirements for Internships

The Director or Internship Coordinator will provide evaluation forms to all student-interns and their supervisors prior to the end of the internship. Students should return these forms along with all required written assignments to the Director/Internship Coordinator before their departure from the Middlebury School Abroad.

Contact Information for Internships in Latin America

International Programs & Off-Campus Study - to speak to the advisor for the Country in Latin America where you'll be studying
Tel: 802.443.5745
Nicole Chance for Brazil, Bill Mayers for Chile, or Susan Parsons for Argentina and Uruguay

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Argentina) - Juan Hurtado, Internship supervisor
Tel: 011.54.11.5238.3000; jhurtado@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Brazil, and Uruguay) - Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director
Tel: 011.54.11.4671.0731; cgonzal@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Chile) - Jeff Stevenson, Director
Tel: 011.56.2.233.9076; jstevens@middlebury.edu

Career Services Office - for advice and counseling
Tel: 802.443.5100; careerservices@middlebury.edu; web site

College Credit for Internships

Serious students have the opportunity to earn credit for an internship.*

Interns will be required to fulfill a variety of work-related  and academic assignments:

  • Interns will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will complete an independent research paper (~20 pages) in the target language that will be graded by a faculty member on site.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • Upon completion of the internship, Students must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship (in English) for posting on our webpage.
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.
  • Interns will earn credit equal to that of a regular course for the internship and take one less class that semester compared to the normal course load. Students may not take the normal full load of courses for their site AND also receive academic credit for their internship. Internships will receive a letter grade.
  • Interns are not allowed to receive any salary or other financial support from their internship hosts.

    At the start of the internship, internship students, their internship supervisor and the internship coordinator will sign a form agreeing to the terms for receiving credit. At the end of the internship, all parties will sign a similar form verifying that all requirements were met. Upon receiving these three signatures, the internship will appear on the student's Middlebury transcript and the student will receive academic credit.

* Students from colleges and universities other than Middlebury will need pre-approval from their home institution in order to receive credit for an internship.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Evaluation & Other Requirements for Internships

The Director or Internship Coordinator will provide evaluation forms to all student-interns and their supervisors prior to the end of the internship. Students should return these forms along with all required written assignments to the Director/Internship Coordinator before their departure from the Middlebury School Abroad.

Contact Information for Internships in Latin America

International Programs & Off-Campus Study - to speak to the coordinator of the School in Latin America
Tel: 802.443.5745

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Argentina) - Juan Hurtado, Internship supervisor
Tel: 011.54.11.5238.3000; jhurtado@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Brazil, and Uruguay) - Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director
Tel: 011.54.11.4671.0731; cgonzal@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Chile and Mexico) - Jeff Stevenson, Director
Tel: 011.56.2.233.9076; jstevens@middlebury.edu

Career Services Office - for advice and counseling
Tel: 802.443.5100; careerservices@middlebury.edu; web site

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Evaluation & Other Requirements for Internships

The Director or Internship Coordinator will provide evaluation forms to all student-interns and their supervisors prior to the end of the internship. Students should return these forms along with all required written assignments to the Director/Internship Coordinator before their departure from the Middlebury School Abroad.

College Credit for Internships

Serious students have the opportunity to earn credit for an internship.*

Interns will be required to fulfill a variety of work-related  and academic assignments:

  • Interns will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will complete an independent research paper (~20 pages) in the target language that will be graded by a faculty member on site.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • Upon completion of the internship, Students must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship (in English) for posting on our webpage.
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.
  • Interns will earn credit equal to that of a regular course for the internship and take one less class that semester compared to the normal course load. Students may not take the normal full load of courses for their site AND also receive academic credit for their internship. Internships will receive a letter grade.
  • Interns are not allowed to receive any salary or other financial support from their internship hosts.

    At the start of the internship, internship students, their internship supervisor and the internship coordinator will sign a form agreeing to the terms for receiving credit. At the end of the internship, all parties will sign a similar form verifying that all requirements were met. Upon receiving these three signatures, the internship will appear on the student's Middlebury transcript and the student will receive academic credit.

* Students from colleges and universities other than Middlebury will need pre-approval from their home institution in order to receive credit for an internship.

Contact Information for Internships in Latin America

International Programs & Off-Campus Study - to speak to the coordinator of the School in Latin America
Tel: 802.443.5745

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Argentina) - Juan Hurtado, Internship supervisor
Tel: 011.54.11.5238.3000; jhurtado@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Brazil, and Uruguay) - Claudio González Chiaramonte, Director
Tel: 011.54.11.4671.0731; cgonzal@middlebury.edu

Middlebury College School in Latin America (Chile and Mexico) - Jeff Stevenson, Director
Tel: 011.56.2.233.9076; jstevens@middlebury.edu

Career Services Office - for advice and counseling
Tel: 802.443.5100; careerservices@middlebury.edu; web site

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Evaluation & Other Requirements for Internships

The Director or Internship Coordinator will provide evaluation forms to all student-interns and their supervisors prior to the end of the internship. Students should return these forms along with all required written assignments to the Director/Internship Coordinator before their departure from the Middlebury School Abroad.

College Credit for Internships

Serious students have the opportunity to earn credit for an internship.*

Interns will be required to fulfill a variety of work-related  and academic assignments:

  • Interns will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will complete an independent research paper (~20 pages) in the target language that will be graded by a faculty member on site.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • Upon completion of the internship, Students must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship (in English) for posting on our webpage.
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.
  • Interns will earn credit equal to that of a regular course for the internship and take one less class that semester compared to the normal course load. Students may not take the normal full load of courses for their site AND also receive academic credit for their internship. Internships will receive a letter grade.
  • Interns are not allowed to receive any salary or other financial support from their internship hosts.

    At the start of the internship, internship students, their internship supervisor and the internship coordinator will sign a form agreeing to the terms for receiving credit. At the end of the internship, all parties will sign a similar form verifying that all requirements were met. Upon receiving these three signatures, the internship will appear on the student's Middlebury transcript and the student will receive academic credit.

* Students from colleges and universities other than Middlebury will need pre-approval from their home institution in order to receive credit for an internship.

On The Job - Internships Abroad

In order to ensure a successful internship experience, you must be proactive and take initiative. You will be responsible for yourself and your learning. The staff in many organizations and businesses is extremely busy and overworked. If you don't assert yourself, you may fall through the cracks.

You may have to prove yourself to your supervisor in the first few weeks. If you are given an easy assignment which makes you think, "I didn't come all the way here to do this kind of work!" do the assignment cheerfully and with as much effort as you would for an assignment that is more challenging and interesting. Your supervisor may have given you an assignment to see how you will deal with it. Remember that at all times during your internship, you will need to be flexible.

Unless you are working for an international and/or western government agency, you will need to be comfortable working in a relatively unstructured work environment. If you are not working on a specific assignment at the moment, use the opportunity to learn more about the organization and the field in which you are working. In general, internship supervisors not only appreciate your asking questions, but they expect it. Take the time to get to know your supervisor and discuss what is expected of you. Remember that your employer may never have hosted an intern before, so you may have to take the initiative.

Also, remember that every job has slow days. Get to know the people with whom you work, even if they are not your age. There are lots of things you can learn from your co-workers if you make the effort.

Once you've been at your internship for a while, ask for more challenging assignments. Ask to take responsibility for a project or a component of a project that will draw on your strengths, address your weakness, and allow you to improve yourself and gain valuable experience.

The Director/Internship Coordinator will monitor your overall internship experience. S/he will contact you and your internship supervisor regularly to discuss your internship. Please contact the Director/Internship Coordinator immediately if you have any problems or need other advice or help regarding your internship. It is not acceptable to stop attending your internship because you decide you do not like it or because it is not what you expected. If this situation occurs, talk to the Director/Internship Coordinator so any problems can be addressed. Also, if you are sick and cannot go to work, please let the Director/Internship Coordinator know, so that s/he may inform your internship supervisor.

At the end of your internship, be sure to send a thank-you note to your supervisor, recognizing his or her efforts and support for you. This is also important because you may want to ask your supervisor for a reference in the future, whether for a job or graduate school applications. Expressing your appreciation can also help create opportunities for future students to intern with that organization.

Evaluation & Other Requirements for Internships

The Director or Internship Coordinator will provide evaluation forms to all student-interns and their supervisors prior to the end of the internship. Students should return these forms along with all required written assignments to the Director/Internship Coordinator before their departure from the Middlebury School Abroad.

College Credit for Internships

Serious students have the opportunity to earn credit for an internship.*

Interns will be required to fulfill a variety of work-related  and academic assignments:

  • Interns will work from 10-15 hours a week.
  • Interns will complete an independent research paper (~20 pages) in the target language that will be graded by a faculty member on site.
  • Interns will keep a daily journal in the target language of their activity at the internship that should be a record of the internship experience: recording assignments given, tasks completed, personal impressions (of the field of employment and host site's role in it), etc.
  • Upon completion of the internship, Students must submit a 1-2 paragraph summary description of the internship (in English) for posting on our webpage.
  • Interns must also complete an evaluation form at the end of their internship.
  • Interns will earn credit equal to that of a regular course for the internship and take one less class that semester compared to the normal course load. Students may not take the normal full load of courses for their site AND also receive academic credit for their internship. Internships will receive a letter grade.
  • Interns are not allowed to receive any salary or other financial support from their internship hosts.

    At the start of the internship, internship students, their internship supervisor and the internship coordinator will sign a form agreeing to the terms for receiving credit. At the end of the internship, all parties will sign a similar form verifying that all requirements were met. Upon receiving these three signatures, the internship will appear on the student's Middlebury transcript and the student will receive academic credit.

* Students from colleges and universities other than Middlebury will need pre-approval from their home institution in order to receive credit for an internship.

Study Abroad Guidelines

We encourage our students to study abroad, especially in a foreign language. Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with their advisor before the second semester of the sophomore year.

A grade point average of 3.0 in the major and 2.7 overall is required for study abroad. Please note that at least 7 Fall and Spring term courses must be taken at Middlebury College, including a senior seminar.

Students must submit their application to study abroad through the online application process that can be accessed here:  http://www.middlebury.edu/international/sa/what_to_know/applying.  As part of their application, students must submit an essay that should address the following academic questions:

1. Rationale: Why do you want to study abroad? How is this related to your academic program?

2. Preparation: What course work have you taken to prepare you for study abroad?

Recommended courses for study abroad: PSCI 0103 Comparative Politics, PSCI 0109 International Politics, and a course that includes significant content on the region where you will study abroad.

3. Program Selection: Where will you study abroad? Why this university or program? What courses will you take? Why?

4. How will you complete your major after returning to Middlebury?

In making your decision about where to study abroad, you should note that Middlebury runs a wide array of study abroad programs, in 16 countries.  Many students also study at other universities and programs around the world.  For more information, please see the study abroad website:  http://www.middlebury.edu/international/sa.  You should also consult with your advisor, as well as staff in the Office of International Programs and Off-Campus Study, located in Sunderland Language Center.

Revised August 2014

Programs and Advisors

Majors in political science often spend a year or semester abroad. A good place to start is with the Study Abroad Guidelines and Recommended Programs. The Office of Off-Campus Study can provide more information on these opportunities. Many political science students participate in activities sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs.


Another related program in which Political Science majors may choose to participate is the Washington Semester exchange with American University. Contact the Office of Off Campus Study at x5745 for information regarding this option.

Trying to find an internship? The Career Services Office has information on opportunities in the fields of Government, Law, and Public Policy as well as a general guide to securing internships. 

The Pre-Law Club is for students interested in law school, who should feel free to consult with Professor Murray Dry, ext. 5305, Munroe 221.

Students wishing to pursue graduate study in the discipline may wish to consult US News ranking of graduate schools in political science.

Those interested in publishing their work could consider submitting to the Undergraduate Journal of Social Sciences, a peer-reviewed publication for articles related to public policy.  Another option is the Michigan Journal of Political Science, published by University of Michigan undergraduate students.

Also of interest is the home page of the American Political Science Association.

Internship Opportunities

While we do our best to assist students interested in pursuing an internship, we cannot guarantee an internship placement. The application process is competitive, and only qualified candidates will ultimately be offered an internship.

Internship possibilities span a wide range, and vary from site to site, but generally include government agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses, the media, educational organizations, and the arts.  Recent students have participated in internships in Spain at FUNDESO (Fundacion Desarrollo Sostenido), WWB (Women's World Banking), Hilti Española S.A., and ACNUR (Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para Refugiados). In Italy, students participated in internships in the American Consulate in Florence and the Horne Museum. In France, students have interned in the Assemblée Nationale, the Conseil Régional d'Ile de France, Maria Louisa Design, Frac I'le de France, the Robert Schuman Foundation, and Theatre et Cinema Ile de France. And in Russia students have interned at CNN, NPR, The United States-Russia Investment Fund, The MacArthur Foundation, Project Harmony, The Golden Ring newspaper, The American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, The Eurasia Foundation, The Moscow Institute of Modern Art, Yaroslavl Investment Center, as well as local schools and libraries. In any given year, however, we cannot guarantee an internship in a specific field or organization, though we will make every effort to accommodate. Please be aware that prospective internship providers normally expect candidates to have appropriate skills or background knowledge and interest in the field. In addition, students must have strong functional skills in the target language. If your language skills are not strong enough, you may not qualify for an internship.

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