Health Services FAQs

If you have a question that does not appear on this page, please contact Health Services at 802-443-5135.

What does it cost to be seen at the Health Services?

There is no charge for your visit at the Health Services.  However, there are a few exceptions. We do charge for:

  • Some infectious disease & STI tests
  • Some common orthopedic devices (e.g., aircast, wrist and thumb splints, cervical collar)
  • Some immunizations.
  • Plan B (emergency contraception)

If you have any questions about these charges or our services, please call and ask to speak to one of our nurses.

Where is the Health Services located?

We are located in Centeno House at 136 South Main Street.  You can find us on the Campus Map.

What are the Health Services hours?

We are open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and 12-4 p.m. on weekends. (Please visit our Yearly Schedule for dates when our office is closed throughout the year.)

What should I do if I get sick or injured and the Health Services is closed?

You can be seen at Porter Hospital's Emergency Department on South Street in Middlebury if you have a medical need that cannot wait until the Health Services is open.

Do I need an appointment to be seen at the Health Services?

No, you don't need an appointment to see a nurse at Parton Health.  Walk-in clinic hours are:

Academic year

Nurses are available Monday - Friday during our walk-in hours from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and from 6-9 p.m. for urgent concerns.  On weekends nurses are available from 12-4 p.m. 

Summer Language Programs:

Nurses are available Monday - Friday during our walk-in hours from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on weekends.

Appointments with MD/NP:

Mark Peluso, MD, and Laurel Kelliher, FNP are available to see students by appointment Monday - Friday during the academic year and summer school programs.  Just call Parton at 802-443-5135 to schedule an appointment. 

Do I have health insurance through Middlebury College?

All undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at Middlebury College are automatically enrolled in the mandatory student accident only insurance plan.  This plan provides coverage for accidents sustained during the academic year (September 1 through May 31).  The voluntary sickness insurance, which can be purchased through Gallagher Koster Insurance, provides coverage for illness from September 1 through August 31.  For more information regarding insurance benefits or to enroll in the sickness plan, please visit the Koster Insurance website.

What's the best way to prevent the flu?

Get a flu shot!

What should I do while I'm sick with the flu?

Stay away from others as much as possible to keep from making them sick.  If you must leave home, for example to get medical care, wear a face mask if you have one, or cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue.  And wash your hands often to keep from spreading flu to others.

How long should I stay home if I'm sick?

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other things you must do that no one else can do for you. Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine*, such as Tylenol®.You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.

What is the College's plan for pandemic flu outbreak?

Middlebury College has an Emergency Plan that includes the threat of severe illness, such as pandemic flu.

Travel Immunizations


Health Services provides travel immunizations to students going abroad. Immunization requirements vary depending on the student's itinerary, past medical history and previous immunizations. Students should prepare for travel vaccines at least 3-6 months before your date of departure.

Prior to your travel visit you'll need to be prepared by following these simple steps:

1.  Stop by the Health Services to receive your travel packet which includes a "Travax" report specific to your travel destination(s).

2.  Complete the Travel Questionnaire.  You must bring this completed questionnaire with you to your appointment.

3.  Schedule your appointment with the doctor or nurse practitioner.

HIV testing and physical exams may also be required for some travel destinations and are available at the Health Services. Additional information about travel immunizations can be obtained by contacting the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) either by phone (1-404-332-4565) or the Internet http://www.cdc.gov/ The CDC will provide you with the most current immunization recommendations, as well as disease prevention information.

Lessons from an octopus: student studies invertebrate learning [video]

As senior Alexa Warburton opens the door to the cephalopod lab, a pungent smell escapes into the third-floor hallway of Middlebury College’s McCardell Bicentennial Hall. “It smells like the ocean,” she comments. And it should. Warburton, a senior biology major from Hopkinton, N.H., is spending her summer studying a member of the cephalopod family, Octopus bimaculoides . Her goal is to study the way these saltwater creatures learn, thereby furthering the already-extensive body of research on invertebrate intelligence.

Recent grad hopes thesis on TV storytelling will lead to discussion

Aaron Smith, Class of 2009 and a Film & Media Culture major, has posted online a discussable version of his senior thesis, "Transmedia Storytelling in Television 2.0," in which he explores how contemporary television has embraced new narrative strategies and digital media to encourage participation in expansive storyworlds. In this online version, he invites readers to comment in the margins of his project to further the dialogue about these new developments.

Students in plant biology course take part in community service projects

Students in Helen Young's plant biology class participate in community service projects, ranging from providing information about produce for the Middlebury Natural Food Coop, creating a species list of the plants at Sycamore Park for the Conservation Commission of the town of Bristol, surveying the plants on the green-roof of Atwater Dining Hall to determine which species survive best under these conditions, assessing the health of trees on campus to assist the College horticulturist, plan pruning schedules, assisting a local vintner in harvesting grapes, and doing a forest assessment of The Waterworks Center for their forest management plan. These projects, and more, will be incorporated into the fall 2009 offering of the course.

Professor and students look at effects of landscape on pollinators

Helen Young (Biology) and her students have recently been exploring the effects of landscape on pollinator: How does the presence of forest around a field affect the number and diversity of bee pollinators? What about corn fields? Or roads and rivers and cities? This work has strong relevance in Addison County, an area heavily reliant on agriculture for its well-being. Once the researchers know what influences pollinator abundance, they will be able to include this information in city and county planning, and help farmers maintain (or even increase) their crop yield for insect pollinated crops.

Choral music in the air at Middlebury, and on tour of Northeast

The College Choir embarked on a highly successful tour of Connecticut, Boston and New York City over spring break, April 21-26, 2009. The tour included concerts at the phenomenal Trinity Church in the City of Boston, St. Michael's Church on 99th Street in Manhattan, and the New York Society for Ethical Culture on Central Park. The choir sang contemporary choral music, madrigals, and folk music, and a short choral drama featured several Middlebury student soloists. The trip also included a visit to an alum's high school chorus, and joint concerts with Saengerfest Men's Chorus in Boston, the United Nations International School Chamber Ensemble, and Philip Hamilton '82 and his a cappella project, Voices. The choir gave a home concert of the tour program on March 30 at Middlebury. 

2008-2009 marks the successful establishment of two new Music Department ensembles, the Men's and Women's Glee Clubs. The men's group offers a department ensemble singing group for men to learn vocal technique and a variety of repertoire, as well as ensemble singing. The women's group grew to 15 members this year and performed selections from "Gloria" by the 17th century master Antonio Vivaldi, with chamber orchestra, as well as several modern pieces and adaptations of international folk music. The Women's Glee Club is conducted by Jessica Allen. With the addition of the Glees, the Middlebury Music Department now has more students singing in ensembles than in the past several years, mostly students who have little or no contact with the department outside of those ensembles.

In May the College Choir performed five Ukrainian Romani songs, with several Middlebury student soloists and a student guitarist. The songs arrangements are the result of field research by Director of Choral Activities Jeffrey Buettner, who returns to Ukraine in June to share the recordings of the College Choir with Romani musicians there. Also on the program were three songs for chorus and piano by Johannes Brahms.

Student musician gets a chance to see the greats up close and personal

Andrew Throdahl, Class of 2009, studied piano with Music Department affiliate artist Diana Fanning, an internationally renowned musician. Throdahl has played the piano for more than a dozen years, and recently gave his senior recital in the Mahaney Center for the Arts Concert Hall. He has a special perspective on playing in Concert Hall, having worked as page-turner for many of the chamber musicians who visit as part of Middlebury’s Performing Arts Series. He has been able to sit at the elbows of some of the greats—and had the best seat in the house to observe their technique. Throdahl is also a classical music reviewer for The Campus, the student newspaper. So while he’s been earning a paycheck turning pages, he’s also had an insider’s eye for evaluating professional artists’ work.

Added Diana Fanning, "Andrew started off his time at Middlebury by winning the College Concerto Competition and playing a Prokofiev Piano Concerto with the College Orchestra. He ended his time at Middlebury performing a Prokofiev Sonata, as well as works by Beethoven, Chopin, Bach and Scriabin, at his Senior Recital. In the meantime, he also won the Chamber Music Competition, studied music composition in Paris, had an internship with an early music ensemble in NYC, was Arts Editor for The Campus, wrote insightful music reviews for The Campus and for the Addison Independent, and played in a benefit concert to help raise money for the Town Hall Theater.

Graduating seniors head to American Dance Festival in North Carolina

Dance professor Penny Campbell reports:

Our graduating seniors in Dance are Simon Thomas-Train and Yina Ng. Together they represented the New England region of the American College Dance Festival Association at the National Dance Gala in New York City in the spring of 2008 with their duet, "It needs what we don’t want." In addition to their choreographic work, both received senior work fund grants to support their video work, which both presented in their joint senior concert in April 2009. Both also performed in the debut tour of Artist in Residence Tiffany Rhynard’s professional dance ensemble, Big Action Performance Ensemble, here at Middlebury and at other venues in New England. Simon continued to perform with "Big APE" in March at Town Hall Theatre.

Both Simon and Yina have received merit scholarships to attend the American Dance Festival (not to be confused with ACDFA mentioned above) this coming summer. ADF is the six-week summer dance event that began in 1934 at Bennington College, migrated to Mills and then to Connecticut College for many years before settling at Duke University in North Carolina. It is a premier meeting place for professionals dance in the country and the world.

These two graduating seniors in the Class of 2009, who participated in the Student Research Symposium both by showing excerpts from their duet in McCardell Bicentennial Hall moments before heading down to the Mahaney Center for the Arts for their senior concert, have had a fascinating trajectory together. Both are choreographers and videographers, each with a unique vision and aesthetic. And they are compelling, sparkling performers together. They should be performing their duet right there at graduation!

Because these two have been enormously close, both personally and artistically, it’s fitting that they will split the Mahlingaiah Family Dance Prize this year. Their paired trajectories just keep on trajecting!

Faculty and students collaborate to create Web site on South China Sea

The Web site SouthChinaSea.org was started in 1998 by David Rosenberg, a professor of Political Science at Middlebury, as a student-faculty collaborative research project. It has developed into a five-star online resource for students, scholars and policy-makers interested in South China Sea regional economic, environmental, and security issues.

Student takes part in panel discussion during her time studying abroad in Chile

Middlebury student Kate Macfarlane '10 appears in a South American newspaper Web site, El Diario Austral de Valdivia, as part of a panel discussion, "Ciencia Con Nombre de Mujer" on the International Day of the Woman as part of her for-credit internship experience during her time studying at the School Abroad in Chile. See link below. Kate is seated at center.

Award-winning German Theater Group founded by faculty member

Since 2001, Bettina Matthias (German) has worked with German students, from first-semester to graduating senior, in Middlebury's German Theater Group. What started as an alternative to the typical final paper in late 2001 has grown into a very successful staple in the German Department and on campus, a steady group with at least 10 members at any given time, that has won the German Theater Competition at Mt. Holyoke College five times and has performed nine full-length plays in German. In fall, we will celebrate our tenth production together.

Uganda's children: Three Middlebury students go in search of an untold story

“I have lived a kind of life which is not so much easy,” Bonny says, dropping his eyes to finger a thin, golden scar in the rock’s face. He presses it gently and looks upward to meet my gaze.

The rock is large. From the dusty street it seems to swell from the red landscape, its silhouette a silvery apparition hovering above the quiet Ugandan town of Lyantonde. Bonny sits cross-legged atop a low shoulder of the rock, his body framed by the dark hills behind him, and he traces lines of tight, blue script across the weathered pages of a notebook. As he shifts his head, murky sunlight splays across his forehead, casting his delicate profile in shadow on the pages before him.

Three Middlebury students honored by Center for Research on Vermont

Three Middlebury College seniors have received recognition for their research projects from the Center for Research on Vermont at the University of Vermont. Elizabeth Kelley is the recipient of the 2009 Andrew E. Nuquist Award for Outstanding Student Research on a Vermont Topic. Gregory McDermott received the 2009 George B. Bryan Award for Excellence in Vermont Research. Benjamin Robins received special mention from the Nuquist Award committee. The awards were presented at the Center’s annual meeting on May 1.

College supports students’ summer work with endowed internship funds

Thirty-three Middlebury College undergraduates were selected from more than 131 applicants to receive Middlebury funding for unpaid internships with national and international organizations and companies this summer.

“Access to funding for unpaid internships provides our students with ‘real life’ experiences outside the classroom and supports our mission to help students better understand and practice the skills needed for success in today's global community,” said Susan Walker, associate director of career services. “Our students’ depth of involvement in these internships demonstrates again how Middlebury is a model for the liberal arts in the 21st century.”

How did you get here? Student journalists present 15 stories from their peers

Established in the fall of 2008, the Middlebury Fellowship in Narrative Journalism provided three exceptional students the opportunity to explore and apply their journalistic talents. Organizers of the program sought highly motivated and intellectually curious students from a pool of more than 50 applicants who were interested in creating digital portraits of the Middlebury student body. Co-directed by Middlebury College Scholar-in-Residence in English and American Literatures Sue Halpern and Matt Jennings, editor of Middlebury Magazine, the fellowship spanned the academic year and included training in interview techniques, basic photography and sound editing.

Selected fellows were seniors Aylie Baker and Mallory Falk, and sophomore Sarah Harris. They began their project last fall by questioning various peers about their individual journeys to Middlebury by asking the question, “How did you get here?”

Students honored at 16th annual Public Service Leadership Awards event

Forty-seven Middlebury College students and two student organizations were honored for their volunteerism at the 16th annual Public Service Leadership Awards reception held April 29 at the McCullough Student Center.

The students were nominated by service agencies throughout Addison County, by local individuals, and by their peers. All of the nominees received certificates from President Ronald D. Liebowitz and recognition from the more than 100 students, faculty, staff, and community members in attendance at the dinner.

Two Middlebury seniors awarded Compton Mentor Fellowships

Middlebury College seniors Walter “Tripp” Burwell of Raleigh, N.C., and Corinne Almquist of Randolph, N.J., have been selected from a national pool of nominees to receive the Compton Mentor Fellowship. The Compton Foundation, based in Redwood City, Calif., created the Mentor Fellowship Program to support the creativity and commitment of graduating seniors as they move beyond academics and into the world. The fellowship lasts for one year, with a stipend of $35,000, beginning and ending at the annual mid-June gathering of fellows held in the San Francisco area.

Middlebury team places first at 2009 computer programming competition

For the third year in a row, a group of three Middlebury College students finished first in a computer programming contest held on April 24 at SUNY Plattsburgh in New York. The Middlebury team included juniors Toby Norden and Scott Wehrwein, and sophomore David Fouhey. The group was coached by Middlebury College Associate Professor of Computer Science Tim Huang and Associate Professor of Mathematics Frank Swenton.

The annual competition, conducted by the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Northeast Region (CCSCNE), tests students’ abilities to work collaboratively within a limited time to develop computer programs for specific problems.

Sisters in Sport: everyone wins in this fast-break mentoring program

A dozen seventh grade girls excitedly kick off their snow boots and race one another to lace up their tennis shoes before entering the gym. As the door opens, the sound of basketballs bouncing up and down fills the room. A Middlebury College student sees the girls, puts the basketball she is holding under one arm, and beckons the seventh graders onto the court. The seventh graders grab balls and join the college players, ready for fun.

During the basketball season, the Middlebury College women’s basketball team and seventh graders from Middlebury Union Middle School participate in Sisters in Sport. The Middlebury students work with the seventh grade girls as both mentors and as basketball teammates.

Middlebury students attend Powershift 2009

More than 190 Middlebury students and several faculty and staff members will travel to Washington, D.C., this weekend to attend the 2009 Powershift conference, a youth climate gathering that organizers hope will draw as many as 10,000 students from across the country.

Many of the students will also attend Capitol Climate Action, co-organized by Middlebury Scholar in Residence Bill McKibben, which organizers expect to be the largest civil disobedience protest on climate change in history.

This is the second Powershift conference—the first was in November 2007—and is designed to give students the knowledge and training to become effective climate lobbyists. Students spend the first part of the weekend in workshops and lectures. Monday is a day of lobbying during which students descend on Capitol Hill to speak with legislators and their staff about issues related to climate change.

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