Jumpers
Theatrical production:

"Jumpers," by Tom Stoppard

May 1-3, 2008
Thursday-Saturday 8:00 p.m.each evening and 2:00 p.m. on Saturday
Wright Theatre

In a comedy that includes the moon landings, a team of gymnastic philosophers, Zeno’s paradox, a detective who might have stepped from the pages of Agatha Christie (not to mention a hare called Thumper and a tortoise called Pat), Stoppard combines effervescent burlesque with moral urgency.

"I write plays because writing dialogue is the only respectable way of contradicting yourself. I'm the kind of person who embarks on an endless leapfrog down the great moral issues. I put a position, rebut it, refute it, refute the rebuttal, and rebut the refutation. Forever. Endlessly." — Tom Stoppard from an interview with Mel Gussow in the New York Times , 26 April 1972.

Directed by Cheryl Faraone with Alex Draper as George Moore. Sponsored by the Department of Theatre and Dance with support from Pathways to Flourishing: a Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College.

Sponsored by Metanexus, the Department of Theater, the Department of Religion, Ross Commons, The Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life and the Academic Enrichment Fund.  A featured event in "Pathways to Flourishing: A Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College."

 

 


 

Suzanne Holland
Lecture: "The Stem Cell Debate: Why the Embryo is Not the Chief Moral Issue"

Suzanne Holland, Ph.D.
Monday, April 21, 2008
4:30 p.m.
McCardell Bicentennial Hall, room 220


Dr. Holland is chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA, and is Associate Professor of Ethics.  She teaches in the area of religious ethics and values, including bioethics, science and technology, religion, and gender studies.  Her research interests range from the ethics of human genetics and stem cell research, biotechnology and commodification, to broader issues in religion, culture and public policy.   She is co-editor of The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate: Science, Ethics & Public Policy (MIT Press, 2001).


A featured event in "Pathways to Flourishing: A Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College. " Sponsored by Metanexus, The Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life, Ross Commons, the Academic Enrichment Fund, and the Department of Religion.

 

 


 

 

Gilbert Meilaender
Lecture: "Embryo Research: Why Not?"

Gilbert Meilaender, Ph.D.

Wednesday, April 2, 2008
4:30 p.m.
McCardell Bicentennial Hall,
room 220


Gilbert Meilaender, Ph.D. is Richard & Phyllis Duesenberg Professor of Christian Ethics at Valparaiso University. Professor Meilaender is an associate editor for the Journal of Religious Ethics. He has taken a special interest in bioethics and is a Fellow of the Hastings Center. His books include Bioethics: A Primer for Christians (1996, 2005), Body, Soul, and Bioethics (1995). He has recently edited (together with William Werpehowski) The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics.


A featured event in "Pathways to Flourishing: A Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College. " Sponsored by Metanexus, The Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life, Ross Commons, the Academic Enrichment Fund, and the Department of Religion.

 

 


 

Lecture: "Tower of Babel, or God's Partner in Creation? A Jewish Perspective on Biotechnology"

Elliott Dorff, Ph.D.

Monday, March 17, 2008
4:30 p.m.
McCardell Bicentennial Hall,
room 220

Rector and Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at American Jewish University, Rabbi Dorff is the author of Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics and Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader.  In the spring of 1993, Rabbi Dorff served on the ethics committee of Hillary Rodham Clinton's Health Care Task Force, and in March 1997 and May 1999 he testified on behalf of the Jewish tradition on the subjects of human cloning and stem cell research before the president's National Bioethics Advisory Committee.

A featured event in "Pathways to Flourishing: A Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College. " Sponsored by Metanexus, the Saltz Judaica Fund, the Department of Religion, and the Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life at Middlebury College.

 

 


 

Staged Reading: "A Number"

by Caryl Churchill

Sunday, November 4, 2007
7:30 p.m.
Center for the Arts Room 232


Who are you when you discover one day there are 20 or more of you -- a number -- with the same DNA?  The story of a parent and his children.  A staged reading directed by Professor Cheryl Faraone, with Alex Draper and Alec Strum.

Sponsored by Metanexus, the Department of Theater, the Department of Religion, Ross Commons, The Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life and the Academic Enrichment Fund.  A featured event in "Pathways to Flourishing: A Dialogue of Science, Religion and Politics at Middlebury College."

 


 

 

College Convocation Series:

"Redefining Environment," with John Francis

Tuesday, March 3, 2009
Mead Memorial Chapel
7:00 p.m.

John Francis, Ph.D., known the world over as the Planetwalker, spent 17 years in silence and 22 years without riding in motorized vehicles after witnessing an oil spill in San Franciso Bay. He will discuss how the current environmental crisis is a reflection of world-wide social and economic inequity and that any attempt to resolve the crisis must not only address the scientific issues, such as climate change and deforestation, but also the humanitarian issues. From peace and justice to everyday civility, Dr. Francis contends that our connection to the earth as well as to each other is at the heart of the environmental crisis.

Copies of Dr. Francis's book, Planetwalker (published by the National Geographic Society, 2009) will be available for sale at the event.  Dr. Francis will autograph books following his lecture.

The College Convocation Series represents an effort to bring together all members of the College community to reflect upon topics of broad intellectual and cultural importance.

Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program, The Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life, the Office of Institutional Planning and Diversity, The Department of Religion, the Academic Enrichment Fund, Ross Commons and Metanexus.