Middlebury

Resources for Teaching Writing

The Writing Program supports the teaching of writing by organizing and encouraging faculty conversations about writing across the curriculum, writing within the disciplines, and writing beyond the academy. In addition to hosting conversations about writing, we create, collect and share written materials that pertain to the teaching of writing. These handouts include discussion of writing processes and genres, sample writing assignments, and syllabi from writing intensive classes across the curriculum. Some are written for faculty and others are written for students. None are intended to be prescriptive but are made available so that faculty can borrow and adapt as desired.

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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 Myths about College ESL

This article from the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses some of the often-held beliefs about ESL students and classes. It is an important read for those interested in knowing more about working with Multilingual/ESL students at Middlebury.

 Favorite Games

This handout lists Shawna Shapiro's favorite language-based games. Games like these offer an engaging way to review and gauge student learning, in preparation for more formal assessment. This list is particularly relevant to those teaching terminology, vocabulary, and other discrete knowledge from within their disciplines.

Teaching Strategies and Complementary Tools

Every instructor has her/his own way of teaching. Often there is no single strategy rather a blend of different ones. Depending on the strategies that you use when teaching, certain technologies are worth considering. The sub-pages of this section describe a variety of teaching strategies and provide information on each.

The Library's Curricular Technology Team has been hard at work developing expanded information about many technological options.  Each teaching strategy page links to relevant information about specific technologies.

Given the nature of rapid change and quickly evolving tools, these pages will, by necessity of the subject matter, be under constant revision.

 

Teaching and Learning in the Liberal Arts: Constructing Meaningful Connections

The Education Studies Program is grounded in and grows out of the strength and excellence of the Middlebury College liberal arts curriculum. The College's aim has been to educate students in the liberal arts tradition who can bring their learning to bear on practical and significant real-world problems and concerns. In gaining a well-balanced liberal arts education, the Middlebury student majors in a recognized field of inquiry and undertakes a minor in education studies which provides a cross-disciplinary focus on the teaching and learning process. Taken together with distribution requirements in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and foreign languages and cultures, the course work in the major and the education studies minor provide prospective teachers with the analytical framework and content knowledge pivotal to engaging in reflective instruction in the practicum and in their first years of teaching.