Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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 Myths about College ESL

This article from the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses some of the often-held beliefs about ESL students and classes. It is an important read for those interested in knowing more about working with Multilingual/ESL students at Middlebury.

 Favorite Games

This handout lists Shawna Shapiro's favorite language-based games. Games like these offer an engaging way to review and gauge student learning, in preparation for more formal assessment. This list is particularly relevant to those teaching terminology, vocabulary, and other discrete knowledge from within their disciplines.

Teaching Strategies and Complementary Tools

Every instructor has her/his own way of teaching. Often there is no single strategy rather a blend of different ones. Depending on the strategies that you use when teaching, certain technologies are worth considering. The sub-pages of this section describe a variety of teaching strategies and provide information on each.

The Library's Curricular Technology Team has been hard at work developing expanded information about many technological options.  Each teaching strategy page links to relevant information about specific technologies.

Teaching Resources (archive)

The Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research hosts discussions, round tables, and talks about teaching at Middlebury and beyond. 

Teaching and Learning in the Liberal Arts: Constructing Meaningful Connections

Mission Statement  (June 2015)

In the Education Studies Program we believe that we must become a more inclusive and just society.  We must honestly name and relentlessly address the educational inequities that we have created and that we sustain as individuals and members of multiple communities. In our formal settings, whether a Kindergarten class or senior seminar at Middlebury, and in our informal interactions with each other, we seek to embody the intellectual understandings, the humility, and empathy essential to this work.