Middlebury

2015 Spring Training Dates for PWTs and FYMs

Spring 2015 Training begins Thursday, February 12th, CTLR, 4:30-6:30 PM.

All training sessions take place 4:30-6:30 in CTLR, Davis Family Library 225

Org Session    Thursday 2/12 for Peer Writing Tutors & Writing and Academic Mentors
Session 2       Thursday 2/19 for Tutors and Writing and Mentors 
(Bring a paper of your own to Session 3.)
Session 3         Thursday 2/26 for Tutors and Writing and Mentors
Session 4         Thursday 3/5 for Tutors and Writing and Mentors
Session 5         Thursday 3/12 for Tutors and Writing and Mentors
Session 6         Thursday 3/19 for Tutors and Writing and Mentors

Please bring your folder to every training session.

Log training hours under the correct training category.

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Learning Resources

We assist students in fully utilizing their learning opportunities and in developing and refining the skills needed for academic excellence in the 21st century.

Integral to the educational mission of Middlebury College, Learning Resources develops, provides and coordinates a variety of offerings designed to  support and enhance the academic excellence and scholastic achievement of all Middlebury students.

To accomplish these goals we provide workshops, and one-on-one educational sessions which focus on time and workload management, oral presentation skills, effective note-taking, reading skills enhancement, test taking preparation, etc. Enhancing performance in these areas maximizes students' academic success and scholastic standing. It is also our goal to assist students in forging relationships with all facets of Middlebury's learning community.

In collaboration with other professionals from the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research, we also assist faculty in designing innovative, effective teaching environments. We prepare students for leadership roles as mentors, student research assistants, and student assistants for time management. 

Finally in collaboration with the faculty, the Commons and the ADA office, Learning Resources also implements prevention and intervention initiatives for students who are at academic risk or who face challenges related to learning styles or disabilities.

We are open Monday - Friday 9AM to 5PM.
Yonna McShane, Director of Learning Resources
802.443.5142

CTLR


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New Pedagogy Enrichment Fund

The Pedagogy Enrichment Fund for the 2014/15 academic year supports new directions in teaching. The fund has two tracks: Requests for funding under $500 will be reviewed on a weekly basis; requests ranging from $500 to $1500 will be reviewed at the beginning of each month of the rest of the 2014/15 academic year.

If interested, please send a description of the proposed pedagogical enrichment with a proposed budget to Jim Ralph, the CTLR director (ralph@middlebury.edu) and please cc JoAnn Brewer (brewer@middlebury.edu).  Proposals will be reviewed until the fund is exhausted. more info

Peer Writing Tutors

Drop-in peer writing tutoring begins the second week of the fall and spring semesters. Drop-in Peer Writing Tutors are available for writing tutoring sessions:

7:30 pm - midnight Sunday through Thursday
(except during school vacations)

in the Center for Teaching, Learning & Research (Davis Family Library 225) and some evenings in the Commons. Commons peer writing tutoring occurs in all five Commons on various evenings.

Peer writing tutors can, also, help with oral presentation skills. Sessions usually run about 30 minutes per student. No appointment is necessary. Drop-in tutors are not available during Winter Term.

tutors

History

The case study for Middlebury College's January 2003 participation in the Wharton/IRHE Program on Leadership in Higher Education helps articulate a mission for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research; to integrate a portion of the programs central to teaching and learning at Middlebury and to house them in the new library:

"The digital revolution has, if anything, helped usher in an age when intellectual inquiry entails fewer contacts with people outside one's own domain. At the same time, many of the questions being asked and pursued on the forefronts of knowledge…require collaboration among academic disciplines. If a library as a physical amalgamation of resources seems outmoded in one sense, it nonetheless embodies the kinds of academic syntheses required to address a growing number of complex societal problems."

Such intellectual inquiry and academic synthesis are the goals of a liberal arts college, and Middlebury is well situated to integrate its curricular, service, and even physical resources within a new model for teaching, learning, and research. In a digital environment, research, teaching, and learning increasingly occur on a continuum in both virtual and physical space, at all hours of the day, independently and in collaboration, with all members of an educational community involved in all three activities. But this continuum, introduced by digital technology, can be reflected in even more areas of curriculum, in academic services, and in residential life. The Center for Teaching, Learning and Research, which integrates and supports our work together as an educational community, offers us all more options for conscious growth as learners and teachers and for informed use of ever-changing technologies and resources.

Integrating research, curriculum, and support in The Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research is a step toward the academic synthesis a 21st century liberal arts college can offer both its own community members and society at large. The new library provides us with an unusual opportunity to rethink the collaboration and coordination patterns among our learning, teaching and research resources at Middlebury, and to achieve greater visibility for learning as a lifetime responsibility.

The Center incorporates the offices of the Asst. Dean for Instruction, the College Writing Program, the Writing Center, Learning Resources, Peer Tutoring, the First-Year Seminar Program, and Sponsored Research.

CTLR

History

The case study for Middlebury College's January 2003 participation in the Wharton/IRHE Program on Leadership in Higher Education helps articulate a mission for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research; to integrate a portion of the programs central to teaching and learning at Middlebury and to house them in the new library:

"The digital revolution has, if anything, helped usher in an age when intellectual inquiry entails fewer contacts with people outside one's own domain. At the same time, many of the questions being asked and pursued on the forefronts of knowledge…require collaboration among academic disciplines. If a library as a physical amalgamation of resources seems outmoded in one sense, it nonetheless embodies the kinds of academic syntheses required to address a growing number of complex societal problems."

Such intellectual inquiry and academic synthesis are the goals of a liberal arts college, and Middlebury is well situated to integrate its curricular, service, and even physical resources within a new model for teaching, learning, and research. In a digital environment, research, teaching, and learning increasingly occur on a continuum in both virtual and physical space, at all hours of the day, independently and in collaboration, with all members of an educational community involved in all three activities. But this continuum, introduced by digital technology, can be reflected in even more areas of curriculum, in academic services, and in residential life. The Center for Teaching, Learning and Research, which integrates and supports our work together as an educational community, offers us all more options for conscious growth as learners and teachers and for informed use of ever-changing technologies and resources.

Integrating research, curriculum, and support in The Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research is a step toward the academic synthesis a 21st century liberal arts college can offer both its own community members and society at large. The new library provides us with an unusual opportunity to rethink the collaboration and coordination patterns among our learning, teaching and research resources at Middlebury, and to achieve greater visibility for learning as a lifetime responsibility.

The Center incorporates the offices of the Asst. Dean for Instruction, the College Writing Program, the Writing Center, Learning Resources, Peer Tutoring, the First-Year Seminar Program, and Sponsored Research.

CTLR

History

The case study for Middlebury College's January 2003 participation in the Wharton/IRHE Program on Leadership in Higher Education helps articulate a mission for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research; to integrate a portion of the programs central to teaching and learning at Middlebury and to house them in the new library:

"The digital revolution has, if anything, helped usher in an age when intellectual inquiry entails fewer contacts with people outside one's own domain. At the same time, many of the questions being asked and pursued on the forefronts of knowledge…require collaboration among academic disciplines. If a library as a physical amalgamation of resources seems outmoded in one sense, it nonetheless embodies the kinds of academic syntheses required to address a growing number of complex societal problems."

Such intellectual inquiry and academic synthesis are the goals of a liberal arts college, and Middlebury is well situated to integrate its curricular, service, and even physical resources within a new model for teaching, learning, and research. In a digital environment, research, teaching, and learning increasingly occur on a continuum in both virtual and physical space, at all hours of the day, independently and in collaboration, with all members of an educational community involved in all three activities. But this continuum, introduced by digital technology, can be reflected in even more areas of curriculum, in academic services, and in residential life. The Center for Teaching, Learning and Research, which integrates and supports our work together as an educational community, offers us all more options for conscious growth as learners and teachers and for informed use of ever-changing technologies and resources.

Integrating research, curriculum, and support in The Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research is a step toward the academic synthesis a 21st century liberal arts college can offer both its own community members and society at large. The new library provides us with an unusual opportunity to rethink the collaboration and coordination patterns among our learning, teaching and research resources at Middlebury, and to achieve greater visibility for learning as a lifetime responsibility.

The Center incorporates the offices of the Asst. Dean for Instruction, the College Writing Program, the Writing Center, Learning Resources, Peer Tutoring, the First-Year Seminar Program, and Sponsored Research.

CTLR

Drop-in Tutors are available in CTLR and in Atwater, Brained, Cook, Ross and Wonnacott Commons

Drop-in Tutors work with Middlebury College students at any phase of the writing process. They are, also, trained to help students with oral presentations. No appointment is necessary.

Drop-in Tutors fill out a

. This is not a log sheet for payment.

The Tutee Record Sheet for Drop-in Peer Writing Tutors (above) should be completed and left in CTLR at the end of each shift.  CTLR drop-in Tutors leave the sheet in CTLR near office LIB 225E in the holder that says TUTEE RECORD SHEET.
 
Tutors working in the Commons should return the sheet to CTLR near office 225E, or e-mail the sheet to Mary Ellen Bertolini by 10AM following their shifts.

 

Painting in Background

Peer Writing Tutors have developed a

 

that students and Drop-in Tutors find useful.

 

 

 

Class of 2013

PRESENTATION OF THE

PAUL WARD ’25 PRIZE IN WRITING

For the Class of 2013

OCTOBER 8, 2010

4:30 PM

Davis Family Library, Harmon Reading Area

REFRESHMENTS

WELCOME

Mary Ellen Bertolini, Associate Director of Writing

HONORABLE MENTION

Chelsea R. Edgar

Joshua E. Johnson

RUNNER-UP PRESENTATIONS

Katherine E. Anderson

Daniel B. Sauremilch

FIRST PRIZE PRESENTATION

Adrienne C. Matunas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ward Prize Nominees and Faculty

Ward Prize Nominees and Faculty


CLASS OF 2013 NOMINEES

Prottoy Aman Akbar

Katherine E. Anderson

Urvashi Barooah

Adam Chase Benay

Kaitlin Buerge

Christopher Angelo De La Cruz

Brian John Foster

Christina A. Fox

Michael Thomas Gaffney

Leandro N. Giglioli

Grace C. Gohlke

Melanie Luise  Haas

Zachary Bartlett Hitchcock

Joshua E. Johnson

Vedika Khanna

Emma R. Loizeaux

Adrienne C. Matunas

Juan Sebastian  Munoz Rivera

Jaewon Oh

Joseph T. Radu

Daniel B. Sauermilch

Amy E. Schlueter

Charlotte Lan Steiner

Jacob P. H. Terwitte

Christine C. Wemette

 

Writing and Academic Mentor for FYS

The Writing and Academic Mentor for First-Year Seminars (FYSM) serves as a mentor and writing tutor for first-year students, assisting them with writing and oral presentation skills, time and project management. The Mentor can work with students individually or in groups, either during class time or outside of class, for up to 60 hours over the course of the semester.  The Mentors will be trained, supervised, and paid by CTLR. To learn more about the program contact:

Using Technology in Education - A Parody

This parody of 'The Office" highlights some of the challenges of teaching with technology. From The Chronicle of Higher Education Feb. 10, 2010, it was produced by students at the University of Denver.

Using Technology in Education

 

 

 

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To learn more about the program, contact:


Mary Ellen Bertolini,
Writing Center Director, directs the Peer Writing Tutor and Writing and Academic Mentor Program at Middlebury College. Yonna McShane, Director of Learning Resources helps train the Writing and Academic Mentors.

Maggie Morris, Head Peer Writing Tutor. Maggie approves time, runs evening makeup sessions and assists the Program Director.

Cate Costley, Head Mentor. Cate manages and guides the Writing and Academic Mentors attached to First-Year Seminars. She helps run evening makeup sessions and assists the Program Directors.

Robert Silverstein, Manager of Drop-in Tutors. Robert manages, supervises, assigns evening shifts, creates publicity, and assists the Program Director.

Faculty will find information about using Peer Writing Tutors on the

Peer Writing Tutors and FYS Mentors at Middlebury College blog.

 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (0)
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Group Work

teaching-image01

Increasingly, students are asked to undertake assignments and projects in small groups. Research tends to indicate that students working in small groups have better learning outcomes both in quantity of information learned and retention.

There are two aspects of group work to keep in mind when deciding upon learning outcomes. Some group work focus on output—the creation of a report, presentation, model, etc.  Others focus on the process of group dynamics and the development of interpersonal and problem solving skills.  It is important to decide how you weight these two components and to convey this information to your students.

Some useful resources include:

"Cooperative Learning: Students Working in Small Groups", Barbara Gross Davis in Speaking of Teaching, Stanford's newsletter on teaching, Winter, 1999

Teaching Strategies: Group Work and Team Work, CRLT, University of Michigan

Technologies Supporting and Enhancing Student Group Work:

With the growth of social software tools, there are many possible small group activities that can utilize technology. Some of the most common are:

Collaborative writing environments—depending upon your desired purpose, wikis (a web-based collaborative space) and blogs are tools that encourage participation and both collaborative writing and peer-writing feedback.

Leading Discussion

Complementing lecturing is class discussion. One of the most attractive aspects of a residential liberal arts education is the opportunity to engage with classmates and faculty in small groups for challenging, stimulating and rewarding discussion.

This video from the Bok Center at Harvard introduces some of the recommended practices for conducting an effective conversation.

Barbara Gross Davis, in her book Tools for Teaching, has an excellent chapter on stimulating student participation during discussion sections. Here's an adaptation from the University of Berkeley's site:

Encouraging Student Participation in Discussion

Columbia University's Graduate School of Arts & Sciences also has useful information on leading discussions.

You may want to compare the techniques that you use to lead discussions to these resources.

Technologies Supporting and Enhancing Leading Discussion:

With the proliferation of social networking tools and the increasing familiarity with them by our students, faculty are using a number of tools to augment in class discussion with online electronic conversations.

Some faculty use the electronic discussion to set the stage for an in class session, posting a reading or discussion topic and asking the students to respond before the discussion session. Others use online conversations to extend the thread of an in class discussion beyond class time.  Faculty have observed that students who are reticent in class will often participate more actively electronically. Further, online discussions seem to be a more comfortable medium for students for whom English is not the first language.

At Middlebury, the two most popular technologies for online discussion are to use the comment features of either Moodle or WordPress. Both are capable of supporting online discussion. A few faculty have used Mediawiki (the wiki software currently supported by LIS) for online conversation.

Here are some resources to help you formulate your online discussion strategies:

  1. Types of Questions for Online Discussion - Penn State Learning Design Community Hub
  2. Qualities of a Good Discusser - Lehigh University

Lecturing

lecture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecturing is the most  common and ubiquitous teaching strategy. While most instructors do not spend an entire class lecturing, it is an important component of many classes and is important to be done effectively.

Here's a video  link to 'Lecture Tips' by Prof. Patrick Winston of MIT on how to give an effective talk. Topics include how to start a lecture, introducing and cycling new material, asking questions, using the blackboard, etc. It is very well done.

Lecture Video

Technologies Supporting and Enhancing Lecturing:

(Please note that while we make the transition to our new website, some of the links below may not provide adequate information. If this is the case, please contact Shel Sax.)

Create a Presentation

Presentation tools like PowerPoint or Keynote can be effect vehicles for delivering rich, multimedia content. When misused, these tools can detract from rather than enhance a lecture. Here are some pointers on how not to  ruin a perfectly good lecture with PowerPoint by Prof. David Daniels of the University of Maine.

PowerPoint Quick Start

Personal Polling Devices or 'Clickers'
Clickers provide an opportunity to interact with your students. We currently have a supply of clickers. If you're interested, please contact Dave Guertin. Here's some additional information on teaching with clickers and 'Best Practices for Writing Clicker Questions".

Teaching Strategies and Complementary Tools

Every instructor has her/his own way of teaching. Often there is no single strategy rather a blend of different ones. Depending on the strategies that you use when teaching, certain technologies are worth considering. The sub-pages of this section describe a variety of teaching strategies and provide information on each.

The Library's Curricular Technology Team has been hard at work developing expanded information about many technological options.  Each teaching strategy page links to relevant information about specific technologies.

Given the nature of rapid change and quickly evolving tools, these pages will, by necessity of the subject matter, be under constant revision.

 

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